(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Children's Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Sponsor"

'•ililiii 



30 OSSIVVTJLL 







NATIONAL 8P STING COMPANY, Mb 

GENERAL LIBRARY 



NFW «■ H. Y 



CD Dl '. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/sponsor56spon 



m 



^ r • ~~ u 274. 
50 ftCCK£ fE t, lV 



J 



radio § advertisers use 



eeLS****!* - 




TV FAMILIES 

in the rich market of 

RICHMOND 

Petersburg and Central Virginia 

WXEX-TV also has maximum tower height — 
1049 ft. above sea level and 943 ft. above average 
terrain . . . more than 100 ft. higher than any 
station in this market. It has maximum power — 
316 KW. It is the basic NBC-TV station. See your 
Forjoe man for full details about this great buy. 

WXEX-TV 

Tom Tinsley, President Irvin G. Abeloff, Vice President 

Represented by Forjoe & Co. 



9 JANUARY 1956 



50< per copy« $ 8 per year 



AGENCY CHANGE 

page 27 

Spot tv impact boosts 
Max Factor sales 29 



page 30 

There* 
sir* 1 

sa 

- 




's no ra 
station headache 
sales can't cure 

ge 32 




Would you let your 
radio announcer 
go this tar? 

>age 34 



■ 




DIARY OF A 
TV C0MMERCI 



page 36 



Courtesy to irate 
consumer pays oft 



page 40 





Capsule case hi 
of 92 tv results 



41 



First 
"vsrrtn 

Live 
Local 
Color 



in 

Indianapolis 
and in 
Indiana. 

WFBM' 





WFBM-TV INDIANAPOLIS 

Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 
Affiliated with WFBM-Radio; WOOD AM & TV, Grand Rapids; 
WFDF, Flint; WTCN AM & TV, Minneapolis, St. Paul. 




Kangaroo 
creates audience 



Grey warns about 
"marketing" 



L.A. smog hits 
agency offices 



Continental 
promotes film 



NCS #2 discounts 
to expire 



Good indication CBS TV is off to good start in, effort to build 
strong morning audience is contained in first ratings for Captain 
Kangaroo. This is children's show on CBS TV in 8 to 9 a.m. period 
opposite NBC TV's "Today." December ARB shows "Kangaroo" with 6.6 
compared with 5.6 for "Today." In October, month "Kangaroo" started 
its ARB was 3.2 Interestingly "Today" lost no ground despite "Kanga- 
roo's" gain. Its October rating was on par with December, indicat- 
ing "Kangaroo" is basically creatin g new children's audience in 
time period. 

-SR- 
Latest edition of Grey agency's house organ, "Grey Matter," reflects 
highlights of SPONSOR'S current series on marketing and its impli- 
cations to agency field. "Matter" agrees general marketing emphasis 
has become "rallying cry" of business, but warns, as does SPONSOR 
articles: don't let broad marketing emphasis ob s cure importance of 
th e advertising campaign. (See part 4, "The Advertising Agency in 
Transition," page 27.) 

-SR- 
Lack of communication with home offices in New York is newest smog 
enveloping agencymen at Hollywood and Vine. Biggest problems, 
according to SPONSOR West Coast reporter, are time differential, lack 
of authority to make decisions, lask of understanding of problems 
and refusal of home offices to provide specific information, leaving 
agencymen in dark and playing roles of overpaid office boys. SPONSOR 
will delve into New York-Hollywood problems more deeply in an up- 
coming issue and see what is being done about them. 

-SR- 
Evidence of increasing promotion consciousness of syndicated film 
sponsors is shown in Continental Baking's kickoff of "Annie Oakley," 
CBS Film property. Show started in 70 markets during first week in 
January, was accompanied by merchandising meetings for Continental 
salesmen at district offices. CBS Film promotion represents high 
water mark for show, which has been around about 2 years. At meet- 
ings, Continental and CBS execs outlined merchandising campaign, 
furnished salesmen with Annie Oakley hats, bandannas, p-o-s kits. To 
get biggest impact from show, Continental will put Annie Oakley and 
label on its Wonder Bread. 

-SR- 
First chance for stations, agencies to get added discounts on NCS 
No. 2 by signing up early expires 15 January. Agencies who sign up 
before then get 20% off, stations, 15%. Smaller discounts for "char- 
ter subscribers" can still be gotten before February, 5% before 15 
March. Agencies get 10% off before 1 March, 5% before 1 May. This 
is in addition to other Nielsen discounts. Gross prices for stations 
run from $500 to $18,000, for agencies $250 to $16,000. (Previous 
issue of SPONSOR incorrectly referred to above agency prices as net 
rather than gross. ) 



.1 



M'O.vson. Volume 10. No 1, '.i Januarj 1958 Published biweekl) by SPONSOB Publications. Inc. Executive. Editorial. Advertising. Circulation Offices. 40 E. 49th St.. New 
lork, 17. Printed at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. Md ts a year In U.S. $9 elsewhere Entered as second class matter 29 Jan. 1948 at Baltimore postofflce under Act of 3 Mar. 187» 






for old movies 



Are agencies near 
billing limits? 



No press Detroit 
hits sales high 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 9 January 1956 

Auto firms hot It appears ever-rising tv ad budgets of auto firms are greasing en- 
trance of films from vaults of major movie studios into network 
tv. While films recently released to tv by RKO, Columbia will end 
up in syndication, top pictures may appear first on network. West 
Coast sources say General Motors is reported to have made multi- 
million dollar deal with Matty Fox of C. & C. Super (which bought RKO 
library) for first-run theater. Ford is said to be dickering with 
Columbia for 6 pictures which would appear as 90- minute shows on 
NBC TV. Columbia reportedly asking $125,000 per for such films as 
"Lost Horizon," "You Can't Take It With You." 

-SR- 
One of top problems facing larger agencies is where do they go from 
here. Large agency told SPONSOR recently that expansion in its bill- 
ings could only come from 2 sources — soft drink and airline. This 
doesn't mean that current advertisers can't spend more. They can. 
But it does mean that ceiling is zero after agencies have entered so 
many fields. Upshot of thing could be that old-time barrier against 
handling co mpeting products will be overlooked as long as agency 
produces want-creating, sales-making ad campaigns. 

-SR- 
Federal Reserve Board gives further evidence that strike of dailies 
in Detroit has had little effect on buying. Pre-Christmas sales 
topped anything previous. As in case of New York newspaper strike, 
tv and radio stepped in to carry advertising ball. It's another good 
axample of air media's ability to do job in department store field 
that has not exactly laid down welcome mat for air media pitches. 

-SR- 
Need for fast allocations action was pinpointed last week when 4 uhf 
station said they had had enough. One was owned by Mrs. Claudia T. 
Johnson, wife of Senate Majority Leader Lyndon B. Johnson. SPONSOR 
last issue headlined top story: "Tv 1955: Big spending, big programs, 
but no st a tion grow t h." Recent action in case of 4 ultra-high sta- 
tions is dramatic evidence that lack of station growth is not 
situation that helps advertisers. 

-SR- 
Business plight of uhf stations will not be ignored when the Senate 
Interstate & Foreign Commerce Committee meets on 17 January to pry 
into radio and tv practices. Sen. Warren G. Magnuson (D. Wash.) has 
has had his say long ago on his pe rson al disappointment in lack of 
FCC action in boil-sore ufh problem. Chief counsel for the Magnuson 
committee is Kenneth A. Cox, 40-year-old Seattle attorney. Cox says: 
"My object is to find out what the problems are and what FCC and 
broadcasters should do about them. " 

-SR- 
Westinghouse, in saying goodbye to Philadelphia, pointed up challenge 
in Cleveland, making a point of vigorous expansion seen for Erie 
lake-front city. Part of excitement over move comes from St. 
Lawrence Seaway project. Another is natural expansion Cleveland is 
undergoing. Could be with these and other factors that Cleveland, 
as WBC pointed out, might become one of "b ooming, exc it ing sectors 
of the world." Entry into new market was tinged with regret in 
leaving the Quaker City. Roland V. Tooke, WPTZ general manager, 
takes over reins in Cleveland. Other top WPTZ staffers will join him. 

(Sponsor Reports continues page 107) 



Four uhfers 
toss in towel 



TV vs. politics 
on Capital Hill 



Another 
New York 

on Ohio 
Lakefront? 



SPONSOR 






1 



MORE 

LOCAL 

ADVERTISERS 

THAN ANY STATION 

IN 

PHILADELPHIA* 



HIGHEST RATED 
FOOD MERCHANDISING 
PROGRAM 
IN PHILADELPHIA** 



Represented Nationally by 
GILL-PERNA INC. 
New York, Chicago 
Los Angeles, San Francisco 



I 
I 
I 

-r 
i 

4 
i 
i 

4 
I 

I 

4 
I 
I 
I 




FIRST 
IN OUT OF 

HOME 
LISTENING* 



the Station of Personalities 




I 
I 
I 

r 

i 

i 

i 
i 

i 
i 

4- 
I 
I 
I 



MORE 

NATIONAL 

ADVERTISERS 

THAN ANY STATION 

IN 

PHILADELPHIA* 



GREATEST RATING 
INCREASES OF 
ANY STATION 

IN PHILADELPHIA** 



^Broadcast Advertisers Report 
**Pulse 1954-55 



9 JANUARY 1956 



16 magazine radio 



advertisers use 



ARTICLES 



IHil high tv budgets force agency revolution? 

A debate between the contingent which contends marketing services are an 
attempt to please the client who is spending heavily in tv and those agency- 
men who say marketing revolution has many causes outside emergence of tv 



Max Factor's M> 1,000 answer: spot tv Impact 

Sales rose 29% in first full year of tv (via Doyle Dane Bernbach). Factor did 
it with $2,000,000 spot tv campaign in top 67 markets, providing a forcefu 
demonstration in face of strong program competition 



There's no headache sales can't cure 

SPONSOR sets forth another facet of industry problems when it gives a cross- 
section o^ reasons ~nd reasoning behind rcdio station management migraines 



Would you let your radio announcer go this far? 

Six scriptless radio announcers, a talking camel, and a heart team up to sell 
a villageful of homes. Builder Del Webb gets startling results in a period when 
sales should have taken a slump 



The diary of a tv commercial 

SPONSOR follows the development of a Lucky Strike film commercial from the 
spark of ideas to television's "light up time" to detail day-to-day activity in 
preparing a one-minute announcement 



She changed her mind 

Have you ever been perplexed by complaint letters from consumers? Here's 
what happened when a radio station manager took the time to answer an irate 
housewife who bought a mail-order item pitched on the station 



92 ways tv sells merchandise 

These capsule case histories, proving tv's sales provoking abilities, may be useful 
in your 1956 campaign. They pinpoint markets, costs, objectives, results obtained 
and methods used 



COMING 



1956 syndicated film section 
Headaches of tv station executives 

This annual section will rove"- the ooint of view of some of t^e leading buyers 
of syndicated fil— >■ trends within film programing and selling; latest research on 
film program audiences 

Concludina this SPONSOR series on the problems of men who buy and sell 
time, spotlight next issue moves on to tv station men 




JO 



41 



23 Tan. 



Editor and President: Norman R. Slenr 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Gler 

Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bernard 

Vice Pres.-Adv. Dir.: Charles W. Godwin 

Executive Editor: Miles David 

Editorial Director: James E. Allen 

Senior Editors: Alfred J. Jaffe. Alvin r- 
Evelyn Konrad 

Assistant Editor: Ed Feldmann 

Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman, Joe CI 

Editorial Assistants: Morton C. Kahn, L 
Morse 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Advertising Department: Arnold Alport, 
sistant Advertising Manager; Edwin 
Cooper, Western Manager; John A. Kov( 
Production Manager; Charles L. r 
Gecrqe Becker, Jean Engel 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz, 
scription Manager; Emily Cutillo, Min 
Mitchell, Dorothy O'Brien 

Office Manager: Catherine Scott Rose 

Readers' Service: Augusta B. Shearman 

Accounting Department: Laura Oken, L 
Fazio 

Secretary to Publisher: Helen L. Hanes 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial Circulation, 
Advertising Office: 40 E. 49tb St. <4»th & Mad 
New York 17. N. Y. Telephone: MTJrraj Hill 8-1 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Grand Ave. Phone: STJl 
7-9863 Ix>s Anceles Office: 60S7 Sunaet BouUi 
Phone. Hollywood 4-8089 Dallas Office: 311 ». 1\ 
St. Phone STerling 3591. Printing Office: 3110 I 
Ave., Baltimore 11. Md. Subset lptlona : United 81 
$8 a year. Canada and foreign $9. Single coolei | 
Printed in USA Addreas all correapondeoce t| 
E. 49th St.. New York 17. N Y MTJrraj Hill 8-1 
Conyrieht 1955 SPONSOR PUBLICATION* INC 



FIVE OF A KIND 




WNOE 



WRIT 



KNOE 



EL PASO 

Fabulous ratings in 
Hooper and Pulse 



NEW ORLEANS 

New Orleans' Great 

50,000 Watt 

Independent 



MILWAUKEE 

Fastest Growing 
Station in the U.S.A. 



MONROE, LA. 

Dominates the 
Market — Hooper 



in the market. And as for markets . . . and rat- 
ings, coverage and listener response, have you 
checked the facts on the five NOEMAC stations 
lately? Here are five independent local stations, 
each under separate management, that by fol- 
lowing the same proven programming pattern 
have hung up outstanding Hooper, Pulse and 
market coverage ratings. If you have a job to do 
in one, or more, or all five NoeMac markets, get 
the facts on the local NoeMac stations. They're 
five of a kind, all different, each the best buy 
rate-wise and response-wise in their markets. 



Nationally Represented by 



i&Rfc 



N O E M AC 




Representatives, Inc. 

IN THE SOUTH 

CLARKE BROWN CO. 



STAT I O 




9 JANUARY 1956 



READ BY MILLIONS THROUGHO 




STRYKER 
OF SCOTLAND YARD 

Mystery at its best! 
ALL STAR CAST • 26'/: minutes each 



COMMANDO 

CODY 1 

(Sky Marshal of the Universe) 

26V2 minutes each 

Now being sponsored by 

GENERAL FOODS! 

Adventure! Action! Intrigue! ' 


| STORIE! '\ 


[1 1L 

^^^^^B III 4b 


1 CENTUR « 



HOLLYWOOD TELEVISION SERVICE, INC.- Home Office: 4020 Carpenter St 



HE WORLD IN ALL LANGUAGES 

Millions of TV viewers will 
aud the greatest series 
of intrigue and adventure 
subjects ever produced ! 

WOOD TELEVISION SERVICE INC., Presents SAX ROHMER'S World Renowned 

adventures of 





13-26 1 / 2 MINUTE SUBJECTS 
READY FEB. 1 st 




• THE PRISONER OF DR. FUMANCHU 

• THE SECRET OF DR. FUMANCHU 

• THE PLAGUE OF DR. FUMANCHU 
•THE SLAVE OF DR. FU MANCHU 

• THE GOLDEN GOD OF DR. FU MANCHU 
•DR. FUMANCHU, INC. 



• THE VENGEANCE OF DR. FU MANCHU 
•DR. FU MANCHUS RAID 

• THE DEATH SHIPS OF DR. FU MANCHU 

• THE COUNTERFEITERS OF DR. FU MANCHU 

• THE MASTER PLAN OF DR. FU MANCHU 

• THE SATELLITES OF DR. FU MANCHU 



• THE ASSASSINS OF DR. FU MANCHU 






REX ALLEN 

one of the world's most popular outdoor personalities 
in 

FRONTIER DOCTOR" 

Now in Production! 

26V.I minutes each 

Adventure! Action! Intrigue! 



Coming! The New Sensational Series 

"THE STATUE OF LIBERTY 

made in cooperation with the 

United States Dept. of Justice, 

Immigration and Naturalization 

Service and F.B.I.! 



i, Calif. -32 Branches in the United States and Toronto, Canada, 277 Victoria St. 



CASE HISTORY-AUTOMOBILES 




ALL DAY is 

Automotive Traffic Time 
in Southern California 

Here s proof .... the K-BIG success story of 
Avalon Motors, Buick Dealer in Wilmington, 
California, as told by Jack Frost of Hunter- 
Willhite & DeSantis Advertising Agency. 

"We can show a positive increase in volume 
of new Buicks sold at Avalon Motors; from 30 
cars per month to 60 cars per month, in a 
period of approximately eight weeks. We 
and the dealer are very pleased, inasmuch as 
KBIG produced this 100% increase with a 
KBIG budget of only $1,200 per month, (100 
spots). No other radio station was used, and 
the spots were placed with only small regard 
for strict automotive hours. " 

And the buyers came from the mountains, 
deserts, orange belt as well as Los Angeles 
and San Diego. 

"Well, that's it . . . another smash success for 
KBIG. . ." 

In Southern California, you are "IN" when 
you are "ON" KBIG. 

For more proof of KBIG successes, ask your 
KBIG representative or Robert Meeker man. 







JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, California 
Telephone: Hollywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker & Assoc. Inc 




7<c«</uWiii<' (Jackie) >fori»taro. media 
director, Anderson-McConnell ad agency, Los 
Angeles, thinks it most important for stations to 
establish a single rate structure. "It's my 
responsibility" she told SPONSOR, "to buy eco- 
nomically lor clients and I lace the question ol 
recommending schedules at national rates when 
the client might be able to buy directly at the 
loner local rate. In the latter case the agency 
commission is not paid and the whole basis of 
national advertising is undermined.' She feels 
that in her buying throughout the country a trend 
in that direction seems to be apparent. She'd 
also like to see the ado]>tion ol standardized 
availability and confirmation forms to help buyers. 



Joe Knap Jr., Wesley Associates. Yew York, 
speaks dispassionate!) about daytime tv. since his 
clients generally don't require it except during one 
particular season. "However. I feel that the most 
interesting time period in terms of shifts of 
emphasis in ]9r>6 may well be the afternoon. 
There's a good chance that with strengthened 
and revamped programing, afternoon could take 
the play away from morning tv. despite the 
strength of such poj>tilar personalities as Godfrey 
and Garroway. The psychology of the housewife 
seems to favor afternoon viewing, since a ivoman 
generally relaxes better Umd not-so-incidentally. 
views a commercial more favorably I if she doesn't 
hate unfinished housework hanging over her 
head. Another ]>oint is that housewives like movies." 



James If. Kelly. Fleti her I). Richards, \ew 
) ork. looks ahead into 19o6 and sees daytime 
li progressing. "IT ith the anticipated continued 
tightness of nighttime tv for a year or more 
in lulling multistation markets iand despite new 
Stations on the air\. business will inevitably si>iJI 
over into daytime. So far as programing is 
concerned, just look at the J. Arthur Rank films 
between 3:00 and 5:00 p.m. on ABC TV. They're 
shown in their entirety because the industry has 
i nine to realize that cutting a feature can totally 
ruin it." His concluding comment: "Although 
the increased number of stations in isolated 
markets may cause certain rate adjustments. 
]y.i6 will be a year of expansions.' 



SPONSOR 



Pick the time that's best for you on 



ft 



DIAL 970 



ff 



WAVE'S New Monitor-Like 
Radio Service! 



6:00 a.m. — 9:00 a. m. 
WAKE UP WITH WAVE 

Brings Louisvillians all they 
need to know to start the day. 
News every half hour. Time, 
weather, traffic, farm and 
school news. Sports scores 
and other services. 






4:00 p.m. — 6:30 p. m. 
ROAD SHOW 

Riding with Louisvillians in 
their cars — getting them home 
relaxed and informed. Music, 
news, weather and traffic re- 
ports, time, sports and humor. 



Here's the sparkling DIAL 970 
line-up — from early morning 
till late at night! Check avail- 
abilities with NBC Spot Sales! 




9:15 p.m.— 10:30 p. m. 
NIGHT BEAT 

The pulse of Louisville after 
dark. Direct local news. 
Direct local sports round-up. 
Music and world news. 
Human-interest features. 



DIAL 970— 

WAVE'S DYNAMIC NEW 

RADIO SERVICE FOR A 

DYNAMIC NEW LOUISVILLE! 



WAVE 

LOUISVILLE 

5000 WATTS • NBC AFFILIATE 




INBCISPOT SALES 

Exclusive National Representatives 




1 :00 p.m. — 1 :30 p. m. 
CAROUSEL 

Fun and facts for busy Louis- 
ville homemakers. Club news 
and interviews. Book reviews 
and music. Brass-ring contest. 




1 0:30 p.m.— 1 2:00 mid, 
BOB KAY SHOW 

Louisville's top teen-age pro- 
grant, with unusual adult ap- 
peal. Nightly remote. Favor- 
ite pop records. Interviews. 
Exclusive d/j contest. Teen 
club meetings. 











IN THE MIDDLE OF 
WASHINGTON STATE 

1956 is 

THE 

YEAR FOR BUSINESS 



During 1955, our agricul- 
tural output was good, in- 
come for our products was 
high, new industries moved 
into the area, and many 
permanent new families 
arrived. That means 
GOOD BUSINESS for 
'56. KPQ (ABC-NBC) can 
get you your share of that 
business because it covers 
the area by itself, protected 
from outside station pene- 
tration by a range of high 
mountains. For that PLUS 
business you want, use 
KPQ, Wenatchee. 





5000 WAn? 
560 K.C. 
WENATCHEE 
WASHINGTON 



"Apple Capital of the World" 

REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Moore and Lund, Seattle, Wash. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

For joe and Co., Incorporated 

(One of the Big 6 Forjoe Represented 
Stations of Washington State) 




by Bob Foreman 

is the half-hour television show passe? 

The Super G Constellation hadn't been on the ground in 
California for more than an hour when the question was 
posed for the first time. I heard it a dozen times more in the 
next three days attesting to the fact it's on people's minds. 
"What's the trend now — hours or half-hours?" Everyone 
there is interested. 

Since the question was put to me, I assume they felt I might 
have a logical answer. I do. 

Nielsen beat me to the punch, however, with part of the 
reply. While I was away, the N.F.I, pocket piece came out 
with a revamped format. As you know now they are publish- 
ing the Average Audience figgers up big (as many of us had 
been advocating for some time). Ju^t as big as the Total 
Audience reports. From here on even the most myopic among 
us can compare a half-hour show to an hour epic across the 
way. Before, of course, such a comparison was falacious for 
the big black Nielsen Ratings reflected an accumulated audi- 
ence. Naturally, the hour epics had a whopping advantage 
over the 30-minute efforts. 

But audience size is far from the sole criterion in most ad- 
vertisers' minds. At least it should be. Nevertheless, count- 
ing noses is an important way of checking out this medium as 
it is with any other and a lot of folks were permitting them- 
selves to be deluded by the hour-long accumulation. 

Now the facts are a bit more apparent. The holding- 
power of a show has come more to the fore. The audience 
attendant during a commercial is clearly printed and is a 

( Please turn to page 85) 



Why long shotes looked so hot this season 

Bob Foreman was among the first to point out that a long 
show will inevitably look better than a short show of equal 
appeal. Reason : most commonly quoted Nielsen ratings are 
those for total audience, including all homes tuning six min- 
utes or more. The longer the show, the more homes which will 
tune for at least six minutes, even if many then tune out. For 
uav in which Nielsen is changing reports to put picture in 
clearer perspective, see text above and sponsor Report 28 Nov. 



10 



SPONSOR 



Skip this if you know how to say 




W, 23rd letter of the English alphabet, replaced the Anglo-Saxon 
runic wen in the 11th century. Usually a consonant, as in 
CBS Network, its sound is a voiced bilabial formed by raising 
the far reaches of the tongue (as for do, pronounced with a 
vowel-type of lip-rounding). Written w is silent in some words, 
as answer, but we're not interested in silence. Though virtual!) 
a voiceless fricative in wh, the latter consonant is more to the 
point, as in wherewithal, in which Iowa (pronounced perfect 
for marketing) wallows. In cognate words, Eastern Iowa's W 
corresponds to the Sanskrit v and the extinct Greek digamnia 
(eitheos — unmarried \outh — and that's about enough along 
those lines) . 




M, 13th letter of the alphabet, is a sonant bilabial continuant. 
You stop up the oral passage, or lips, lower the soft palate for 
nasal resonance, and blow. M has syllabic value in some words 
of Greek origin, like chasm (kas'm), but this can't compare 
with the value it has in proper time-buying context, as in 
double do emmmm tee, but we get ahead of our story. Words 
like mnemonic, where the in is silent, are best ignored, which 
we'll have to try and remember (as in mnemonic). In Roman 
numerals M stands for 1,000, which, with the addition of a 
decimal point after the one, gives you a rough idea of how a 
certain radio-television station stands in batting average with 
Eastern Iowans. 




T, 20th letter of the you ought to know what by now, usually 
is a voiceless alveolar stop, not to be confused with the com- 
muter's late afternoon stop ("One on the rox, Joe"). With 
h it forms the digraph th, which represents the characteristic 
English interdental fricative, voiced in this, voiceless, in thing. 
With i it sometimes acquires a sh sound, as in palatial, which 
just happens to be the correct word for homes in double 6b 
emmm teeland. With z it forms the Katz Agency, our national 
representative, not to be confused with an alveolar stop. I is 
frequently silent before / or n, as in often, which is what we 
hope we'll be hearing from you. Our mail address is Cedar 
Rapids, as in Iowa. 



9 JANUARY 1956 



U 



LEE FONOREN 
General Soles Manager 




ykanJk (jm, 



NATIONAL ADVERTISERS AND 
YOUR AGENCIES FOR THE 



LARGEST 

SALES 

VOLUME 

IN 

KLZ Radio 

U ISTORY! 



KLZ Radio has kept with the times— AHEAD of the times! 
Result — more national accounts, larger national schedules, 
greatest national dollar volume in KLZ's history! 

Proof fhar KLZ RADIO is a better buy than ever before! 

BE SURE— Use radio in Denver— Use KLZ Radio! 



CALL A KAT2 MAN 

OR 

KIZ RADIO SALES 

TODAY! 



CBS FOR THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN AREA 

RADIO 
560 k.c. 
DENVER 

REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY 




f 



Mdisoi 

sponsor invites letters to the editor. 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 

HEADACHES ON STAGE' 

Verv interesting indeed is the article 
in sponsor for 12 December (1955) 
headed. "Said the tv rep to the radio 
rep. 'So \ou think you've got head- 
aches." So interesting, in fact, that I 
ha\e an idea but it will require your 
permission to go ahead with it. 

If the reps whom I have consulted 
agree with me. could we get your per- 
mission to dramatize this article and 
present it as part of a panel at our an- 
nual meeting? 

T. J. Allard 

Executive Vice President 

Canadian Assn. of Radio & 

Tv Broadcasters 

Ottawa, Can. 



• Permission sranted 
know who'll I" in the ca 
a picture of the -kit? 



Mild we'd like to 
about sending us 



12 



RADIO, TV IN COURTROOM 

I am most appreciative of the edi- 
torial comment which appeared in the 
December 12 issue of SPONSOR con- 
cerning the efforts of the NARTB 
Freedom of Information Committee. 

We can scarcely overemphasize the 
importance of securing for radio and 
television, with the particular tools of 
their trade, access to trials, public 
hearings, and other public proceed- 
ings, which is equal in all respects to 
that historicalh accorded the printed 
media. If we fail to achieve this, radio 
and television can never attain their 
full stature, and the development of the 
whole art of electronic journalism will 
be dangerously thwarted. 

\s you know, this issue is being 
strenouslv debated on many fronts at 
the present time. Editorial support 
such as yours will be most helpful in 
bringing the vital nature and immedi- 
acy of this matter to the attention of 
those who are interested in seeing 
radio and television realize their full 
potential as information media. 
Robert D. Swezey 
Vice President 
WDSL Broadcasting Corp. 
\ etc Orleans 

SPONSOR 



AGAIN... UP-TO-DATE FIGURES AND MAPS ON 



fill Ifll iH i $11 



SE i SB 3IK IKtfl 




lew ■ Hill 



To give Time-Buyers the facts and figures they need to buy 
effective radio and television coverage, A. C. Nielsen Company is 
now launching Nielsen Coverage Service No. 2 (NCS No. 2). 

This study, like its f952 predecessor, will take the guesswork out 
of time huying by providing, in compact, easy-to-use form, 
current answers to such questions as: 

How big is a station's market — how many homes are there in the area; how many hove radio, 
how many have TV? 

How many families listen to a given station or network? 
In what counties (or groups of counties) are these families located? 

How frequently do these families listen or view and how loyal are they to the station? 
What other radio and TV stations are serving these same markets, and how well? 

How does U. S. radio and TV ownership breakdown by regions, states, counties .. .by 
number and type of sets owned ... by their location in the home... in the car? 
And many more questions of dollar importance to the radio and TV Time-Buyer (or Seller). 

Big discounts for charter subscribers 

The price of NCS No. 2 to agencies and advertisers is based on 
the amount spent for radio or TV time. (Broadcasters" prices are 
determined by the station's own card rates.) This puts NCS No. 2 
within reach of all who buy (or sell) time. And if you subscribe 
to NCS No. 2 by January 15, you can earn discounts of 
20% or more. 

^^^ Nielsen Coverage Service v.. 2 

Send now for full details and agreement form 
Just ask for a copy of the "Outline <>f NCS." 
This brochure describes in full the purpose, scope 
methods, report forms, acceptance, rate structures and 
timetable of NCS No. 2. Send today, so you can 
take advantage <>f the big savings for prompt action. 

601 
A. C. Nielsen Company • 2101 Howard Street, Chicago 45, Illinois • 500 Fifth Avenue, New York 36, New York • 70 Willow Road, Menlo Park California 




9 JANUARY 1956 



13 







rttt*» w 




Represented Nationally by The Katz Agency 



14 



SPONSOR 



WRONG ADDRESS 

A press agent knows that some 
things are better left unsaid. So, when 
I received our annual company supply 
of sponsor's 1956 Radio and Tv Di- 
rectory I passed them along to eager 
recipients. Eight copies went out and 
eight inter-office calls came in. Lo and 
behold, my silence did not help. Every- 
one discovered that Transfilm was ad- 
dressed at 33 rather than 35 W. 45th 
St. 

We could move our studio to coin- 
cide with the listing, but we'd be in a 
fine fix if next year it was changed. 

And, while on the subject of num- 
bers, may I correct another one in De- 
cember 26th's Newsmakers in Adver- 
tising section referring to our presi- 
dent, William Miesegaes? Transfilm 
started producing tv commercials in 
1946, not 1951, as indicated. As a 
matter of fact, our early Camel ciga- 
rette "spectacular" film commercials 
were among the very first tv spots ever 
produced on film. 

Albert Boyars 

Public Relations Director 

Transfilm Inc. 

New York 



TV IN THE ROUGH 

Every once in a while we of the 
"hinterlands" production crews get a 
little discouraged and wonder just how 
much our efforts are appreciated. 

Bob Foreman came to our side and 
gave our vanity quite a boost in his 
Agency Ad Libs of November 28. 

We feel we are really "working" 
television when you have the coopera- 
tion of cameramen, floormen, switchers 
and engineers all pitching in to make 
a smoother production. 

I wholeheartedly agree with Mr. 
Foreman's suggestion that the network 
crews should visit us and see what it 
is like to do a series of programs with 
two cameras, one boom man, one floor 
man, one video engineer and the direc- 
tor acting as his own switcher. That 
is television! And we're darned proud 
of it. 

Forrest H. Respess, Director 
WTTV , Indianapolis Studios 
Indianapolis 



INDUSTRY CARICATURES 

For quite some time now I have 
been trying to locate as many of the 
Jaro Hess cartoon series as I could. 
(Please turn to page 103) 




sport 

in town 




Yes . . . we're the BIG SHOT when it 
comes to play-by-play sports in Milwaukee. 
Our Earl Gillespie does the Braves Broadcasts, 
Marquette University and Green Bay Packers 
football. And, for good measure, we round out the 
year with University of Wisconsin basketball. 

To over a million "sports" in Milwaukee, 
radio means WEMP. So a pretty healthy hunk 
of the population is ready and waiting to receive 
your message . . . over WEMP. . . at the 
lowest cost per thousand. Local buyers know it . . . 
and take advantage of it. Why don't you? 



Milwaukee's Best Buy 



WEMP 

5000 Watts at 1250 



1935-1955 . . . 20 years of service to Milwaukee ■ Represented nationally by lleadley-Reed 



9 JANUARY 1956 



15 



a ll three ^j the 



same 



motttty^ 



I: 




HOOPCR 



PULSE 



TRENDED 



No matter who asks the question in OMAHA 
the answer is Ix O V\r rl 

Master of all who survey ( )maha! That's K( )WH — with 43.7' , aver- 
s age share-of-audience by Hooper (Oct. -Nov.). The latest Pulse for 

Omaha-Council Bluffs has KOWH on top in every time period! So 
does Trendex. KOWH has placed first in audience year after year. 
gradually increasing first place dominance until now KOWH is first 
in evei v time period of every survey in the Omaha market. Mid-Con- 
tinent programming and excitement — pins good coverage (660 KG ) 
are accomplishing wonders for national as well as local advertisers. 
Si i whichever rating you rate tops, you make no mistake with KOWH, 
which rates first with all three. Get an earful from the H-R man. or 
KOWH General Manager Virgil Sharpe. 



^ 



CONTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 



President: Todd Storz 



WHB, Kansas City 

Represented by 

John Blair & Co. 



WTIX, New Orleans 

Represented by 

Adam J. Young, Jr. 



KOWH, Omaha 
Represented by 
H-R Reps., Inc. 



16 



SPONSOR 



JMeii) and renew 




1. New on Radio Networks 



9 JANUARY 1956 



SPONSOR 



- 



AFL-CIO, NY 

Bankers Life & Casualty, Des Moines 



Barbasol, Indianapolis 
Beltone Hearing Aid, Chi 
Carter Products, NY 
Chesebrough-Pond's, NY 



AGENCY 




STATIONS 


Furman, Feiner, NY 




ABC 




Crant, Schwenck & 
Chi 


Bake 


,ABC 

NBC 

MBS 

NBC 

-CBS 





Erwin-Wasey, NY 




195 


Olian & Bronner, Chi 






Ted Bates, NY .. . . 
JWT, NY 





195 

113 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Le»er Bros, NY _ 

Magla Products, Newark . 
Miller Brewing, Milwaukee 
Pharmaco, Kenilworth, NJ 
Pharmaco, Kenilworth, NJ 

Philip Morris, NY 



FCB, NY 



CBS 204 



- — —Edward Lieb, Newark ABC 

Mathisson Assoc, Milwaukee NBC 195 

DCSS, NY ABC 

DCSS, NY CBS 204. 



B-B-T. NY 



CBS 204 



Rexall Drugs, LA BBDO, NY ABC 

F. C. Russell, Cleve McCann-Erickson, NY CBS 203 

Sleep-Eze, Long Beach, Calif M. B. Scott CBS 

Stanback Co. Salisbury, NC Piedmont Adv. Salisbury, NC ABC 

Standard Brands, NY Ted Bates, NY ABC 

Standard Brands, NY Ted Bates, NY CBS 

Sterling Drugs, NY _ D-F-S, NY ABC 

Sterling Drugs, NY D-F-S, NY NBC 

Swift & Co, Chi McCann-Erickson, NY ABC 



197 



204 



195 



Edward R. Morgan News; M-F 7-7:15 pm; 2 (an; 

Vandercook; M-F 10-10:05 pm; 2 )an; 52 wks 

Paul Harvey News; S 6:15-6:30 pm; 1 )an; 26 wks 

Monitor; 14 30-sec. parties; 4 Feb; 52 wks 
Cabriel Heatter; alt Th 7:15-7:30 pm; 5 Jan 
5-min news segments; on 10 segments per week; Jan 
Vi sp'ship on: Brighter Day; M 2:15-2:30; 2 Jan; 

22 wks 
Second Mrs. Burton; T, Th 2-2:15 pm; 3 Jan; 22 wks 
Young Dr. Malone; W & F 1:30-1:45 pm; 4 Jan; 

22 wks 
Helen Trent; F 12:30-12:45; 6 Jan; 22 wks 
Aunt Jenny; M-W-F Full Sp'ship, T, Th Vi sp'ship 

2:45-3 pm; 2 Jan; 52 wks 
Breakfast Club; Th 9:15-9:20 am; 16 Feb 
Monitor; 6 30-sec. parties; 7 Jan; 26 wks 
Whispering Streets; M-W-F 10:45-11 am; 2 Jan 
Romance of Helen Trent; Vi Sp'ship M-W 12:30-12:45 

pm 9 Jan; 13 wks 
Bing Crosby; alt days M-F 7:30-7:45 pm; 5-min seg; 

2 Jan; 52 wks 
Wendy Warren; alt days M-F 12-12:15 pm; 3 Jan; 

52 wks 
Breakfast Club; 3 5-min segments alt wks, 2 5-min 

segments other wks; 6 Feb. 
Bing Crosby; alt days M-F 7:30-7:45 pm; 5 min 

segments; 20 February; 13 wks 
Surprise Theatre; Sat 12:55-1 pm; 12 March; 39 wks 
Whispering Streets; Th 10:45-11 am; 12 Jan 
B-eakfast Club; Th 9:55-10 am: 5 Jan 
Wendy Warren; various days M-F 12-12:15 pm; 5 

Jan; 52 wks 
My True Story; M-F 10-10:25 am; 2 Jan 
Weekday; T-F parties; Jan 
Magic Kingdom; Th 11-11:30 am; 29 Dec; 52 wks 





2. Renewed on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



Bristol-Myers, NY 

Carter Products, NT 



Dromedary Co, 

RCA, NY 

Sterling Drugs, 



NY 



NY _ 



Stokelev-Van Camp, Indianapolis 
Texas Co, NY 



AGENCY 

-DCSS, NY 

SSCB, NY 

..Ted Bates, NY 

..K&E, NY 

D-F-S, NY 

Calkins & Holden, NY 
Kudner, NY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



CBS 
-ABC 

ABC 

_ NBC 

NBC 

.ABC 
_ABC 



204 



195 
176 



Nora Drake; T, Th, alt F 2:30-2:45 pm; 3 Jan; 52 wks 
-When a Cirl Marries; M & F opening segment 10:30- 

10:45 am; 2 Jan 
When a Cirl Marries; T & Th 10:30-10:45 am; 2 Jan 
-Monitor and Top-Ten; 13 parties; 17 Jan 
Young Widder Brown; M-Th 4:30-4:45 pm; 16 Jan; 
52 wks 
-When a Cirl Marries; M-F 10:30-10:45 am; 2 Jan 
_22 five-min newscasts; Sat 8:55 am — S 11 pm 




3. Broadcast Industry Executives 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Miller Babcock WCBS, Miami, managing director 

James Bailey WBRC, Birmingham, Ala, managing director 

Harry W. Barnam WTTM, Trenton, acct exec 

Fred E. Berthelson WTIX, New Orleans, general mgr 

f.eRoy V. Bertin .._TV Cuide. San Fran, regional mgr 



vp 



Charles A. Black WILD, Birmingham, Ala, 

W. M. Carpenter WLOW, Norfolk, vp 

Robert W. Cessna WALM, Albion. Mich, manager . 

Herb Claassen Henrv I. Christal, NY 

Robert D. Crosswell -W'BK-TV, Detr, acct exec 

Bob Davis --KORE. Eugene, Ore 

l" k . DeLier KWTV, Okla City, local sales 

William H. Fineshriber .._ NBC, NY, vp and general mgr 

Timothy R. Ives _ 

Gil Johnston _ WBBM, Chi, sales mgr 

Frank C. King KOVR, San Fran, natl and local sales hd 

Malcolm Klein KABC-TV, Hvwood, sales rep 

Terry H. Lee KOVR, San Fran, exec vp 

Harry L.pson WJBK, Detr, managing director 

Glenn Manley 

Jon R. McKinley ...... __WTAC, WTAC-TV, Flint, Ceneral mgr 

Bill Michaels ._ WIBK-TV, Detr, managing director . 

Paul Miller _ WWVA, Wheeling, West Va, managing director 

lack Rayel .-^BS-TV, NY, exec producer 



Same, vp 

— Same, vp 

*»me, general sales mgr 

Same, vp 

_WNBF, Binghampton, NY, sales promotion and develop- 
ment director 

-Same, managing director 

Same, general mgr 

WABJ. Adrian, Mich, mgr 

H-R Representatives, NY, sales 

Richard H. Ullman, Cinn 

KVAN, Vancouver-Portland, sales mgr 

Same, natl sales mgr 

NY, vp 

Charlotte, sales rep 

St. Louis, sales mgr 

vp in charge of sales 

asst general sales mgr 




TPA, 

WBT, 
_KWK, 
.Same, 
.Same, 
.Same, pres 

Same, vp 

KXLW, St .Louis, sales 
.KFEL-TV, Denver, general mgr 
-Same, vp 

Same, vp 
.Same, Hvwood, network program director 

c ve rett-M<:Kinnev. Chi, Western sales mgr 




William H. 

Fineshriber (3 



John B. She I ton Crosley B'casting, Ch. 

5eymour H. Thomas "»-n, r d Rin*oul & McConnell, Chi, acct exec Joseph Hershey McCillvra, Chi, mgr 

Earl Jay Wa tson KOVR, San Fran, programing development ..Same, vp in charge of programing 

• In next issue: New and Renewed on Television (Network); Broadcast Industry Executives, Adver- 
tising Agency Personnel Changes; New Firms, Neic Offices, Changes of Address, Station Changes 




Scott Dona- 
hue, Jr. (3) 



9 JANUARY 1956 



17 



\etr and renew 



Dan 

Daneholz i4> 




Morris 
Kellner (4) 




William 
Carpenter (3) 




lack 
DeLier (3) 




Fred 
Berthelson (3 




lack 
Rayel (3) 




4. Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Howard Abrahams Amos Parrish, NY, promotion TvB NY retail sales director 

Charles W. Alexander Hicks & Creist, NY, acct exec Moh'r Associates, NY, vp 

Harry A. Beik Warwick & Legler, NY, vp and director _. McCann-Erickson Corp (International) NY, vp and dir 

• Birney Blair KHQ, Spokane, radio sales mgr _ KHQ-TV, Spokane, sales mgr 

Lee Bland _Leo Burnett, NY Same, vp in charge of broadcast production 

Daniel Danenholz Katz Agency, NY, research, prom, and publicity dept hd Same, mbr of board 

Scott Donahue, Jr. Katz Agency, NY, tv sales mgr Same, mbr of board 

David W. Dole Leo Burnett, NY Same, vp in charge of broadcast business division 

Ferrell Q. Dotson >wift & Co. Chi, adv supervisor _ Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, Pittsburgh, acct exec 

Olive R. Fisher Meredith Publishing Co, NY Ketchum, MacLeod & Crove, Pittsburgh, acct exec 

Warren Fales Compton, NY, acct exec _ Norman, Craig & Kummel, NY, acct exec 

loseph Cans Tiiwing & Altman, NY, vp in charge of rad-tv Maxwell Sackheim, NY, vp in charge of rad-tv 

leromy Cury Benton & Bowles, NY, vp Same, administrative cpy dept hd 

Peter Harmon Humphrey, Alley & Richards, NY BBDO, San Fran, cpy 

Anthony Hyde .._Y&R, NY, acct exec _. McCann-Erickson, NY, vp in chg of planning-developi 

Morris Kellner Katz Agency, NY, radio sales mgr Same, mbr of board 

Lon A. King Free & Peters, NY, acct exec Same, asst vp 

Kenneth C. Lovgren Ross Roy Adv, Detr, vp in charge of creative services Foote, Cone & Belding, NY, cpy dept 

loseph C. Lieb B-B-T, NY, acct supervisor K&E, NY, acct supervisor 

Charles W. Llewellyn Harry M. Miller Adv, Columbus, acct exec Ketchum, MacLeod & Crove, Pittsburgh, acct exec 



Chi 

Houston, vp and creative hd 

Chi, acct exec 

Chi, cpy supervisor 



JWT, NY vp and acct rep 
Alexander Adv, San Diego, exec vp 
Same, vp 
Same, vp 



Carrit Lydecker Leo Burnett, 

John K. Lynah Brennan Adv, 

Kenneth Mason Earle Ludgin, 

Edward C. McAuliffe Earle Ludgin, 

Cordon Minter _Leo Burnett, NY Same, film prod mgr 

Robert T. Meyers Pharmacraft Corp, Batavia, III, merchandising mgr Harry B. Cohen, NY, Merchandising director 

Raymond A. Phelps Earle Ludgin, Chi, media director _ Same, vp 

William S. Robinson Earle Ludgin, Chi, research director Same, vp 

Rolland W. Taylor ... .Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City, vp in charge of adv Foote, Cone & Belding. exec vp and director of NY offii 

Crant M. Thompson Esty, NY, acct exec . Same, vp 

Mary Ellen Wheeling Raymond R. Morgan, Hywood, time byr Hottl & Siteman, LA, rad-tv director 

Diana M. Wear Jack T. Holes Adv, Ft. Worth, graphic media director Motti & Siteman, LA, rad-tv director 

Lawrence Wisser ... Storm & Klein, NY, vp and creative director . Emil Mogul, NY, copy chief 

William L. Youns: Esty, NY, vp Same, mbr of copy-plans board 

Clifford R. Schaible Earle Ludgin. Chi, acct exec _ Same, vp 



5. Sponsor Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION NEW AFFILIATION 

Arthur T. Castillo Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City Same, asst new products mgr 

Paul Byrne Prince Matchabelli, Inc, NY, asst to the president Colgate-Palmolive, jersey City, asst merchandising mgr 

Walter V. Clark Simoniz Co, NY, divisional sales mgr Same, Chi, natl TBA mgr 

Hugh C. Creen _ _Sheaffer Pen Co, district sales mgr ...Same, NY, asst sales mgr 

Jean Finegan _ Benton & Bowles, NY 1 ..Fairmont Foods, Omaha, adv and publicity mgr 

Herman W. Leitzow Schering Corp, Bloomfield, N|, mkting and sales Same, vp 

Richard H. MacAlister Schlitz Brewing Co, Milwaukee, director of Western sales Same, asst general mgr 

Stuart Sherman Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City, divisional mgr _. Same, adv director 

Dwight L. Wardell International Nickel Co, NY Sandoz Chemical Works, Hanover, NJ, adv mgr 



6. New Agency Appointments 



SPONSOR 



PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



Charles Antell, Baltimore Men's hair tonic _ _ 

Campana Sales, Batavia, III Solitair, Sheer Magic, Magic Touch 

Doeskin Products. NY .... Cleansing tissues 

Helbros Watch Co, NY Watches 

Hoffman Beverage Co, Newark Soft beverages 

Lanolin Plus, Chi . _. - — Skin preparation 

Mennen Co, Morristown, NJ ...Skin bracer 

Olin M3thieson Chemical Corp, NY Lentheric Tweed. Brand Perfumes 

Pepsi-Cola, NY Soft beverage 

Speidel Co, Providence Jewelry ... 



Cayton Adv, NY 

Crant Adv, Chi 

Harry B. Cohen Adv. NY 

Erwin, Wasey, NY 

Crey Adv. NY 

B-B-T, NY 

McCann-Erickson, NY 

Crant Adv, NY 

Kenyon & Eckhardt, NY 

Norman, Craig & Kummel 



Arthur T. Castillo (5) 



Robert W. Cessna (3) 




Hov/ard Abrahams <4) 



Je.omy Cury (4) 



Paul Byrne (5) 



18 



SPONSOR 



RESULTS 
COUNT... 




and you 
get 'em on 



OMAHA 



RADIO CENTER 



AVERY -KNODEL — Exclusive National Rep. 




ffLZtgj^-J| 



EVERY SALE IS LOCAL . . . and all Omaha listens to, and buys, KOIL-ad- 

vertised products and services. To reach the buying Omaha market, use 



the fastest growing independent station in the area 



KOIL. There must 



be a reason why our renewals are the greatest in our 30 year history . 



RESULTS COUNT . . . and you get em on KOIL! 



the proof of the puddin', is in the eating! 



1956 OMAHA AAA 

BASEBALL 

again exclusively on Ll^X^-X LJ L«j 



The tremendous popularity of Radio KOIL . . . 

among listeners and advertisers alike, both 
local and national ... is further emphasized 
by D'Arcy Advertising of St. Louis, again 
selecting Radio KOIL to carry the complete 
schedule in spite of strong competitive bids 
from 3 other Omaha radio stations. 



see Avery-Knodel, Inc. .. . for all the details. 




immediately available for sponsorship 



"DUGOUT OOP!" 
15-min. of 



RESULTS COUNT 



1 -MINUTE 
ADJACENCIES 
eding and 
following game 



^ 



?/ 



"THE SCOREBOARD" 

All the latest stores 
local and national 



. and you GET 'EM on KOIL 




DON HILL will again broad- 
cast exclusively for KOIL the 
1956 Omaha Cardinals AAA 
Baseball games . . . 

both home and away. 




All OMAHA talked about 



% 



KOIL'S 



ystery SANTA CLAUS ! 



OVER $6,000.00 WORTH OF PRIZES were 

awarded winners of KOIL'S original Mystery 

Santa Claus Contest . . . who he was 

is not important. 

Results really counted up for the sponsor who 

said, "Best promotion we've ever sponsored 

... or heard of!" His enthusiasm is 

proof of the pudding . . . "We're going to 

buy it again in 1956." 



LOOK to KOIL for originality and outstanding promotions! 



If you want more sales in the Omaha Market, 
let KOIL "Showcase" your product or service. 

Remember . . . results count . . . and you get 
'em on KOIL - Omaha. 



Exclusive National Representative 

Avery-Knodel 

RADIO-CENTER . . . OMAHA 



Omaha's only 24-hour Music, News and Sports station 




r. 




John \Y. Ilitbbcll 

V.p. in charge of merchandising and advertising 
The Simmons Co., New York 



An energetic man with sait-and-pepper hair commands the Sim- 
mons Co.'s marketing and advertising strategy, and in the past year, 
has paid close heed to the firm's tv "Blitzkrieg'' and "holding ac- 
tions." With the company as an adman for more than a quarter 
century, John Hubbell, v.p. of merchandising and advertising, has 
become a late, but enthusiastic convert to spot tv and radio both. 

"We started our air media Blitzkrieg a year ago fall in three 
markets," he told sponsor, "Liked the results so well, we're using 
our Blitzkrieg technique in 15 markets this year, holding action in 
10 more tv and five radio markets." 

The distinction between the two plans essentially is this: magazine 
advertising is still the backbone of Simmons Co.'s national effort, 
both for Beautyrest Mattress and Hide-A-Bed. However, in 15 addi- 
tional markets the firm is giving Beautyrest an extra push via satu- 
ration radio and an average of 15 announcements weekly on tv. The 
holding action refers to supplementary spot radio and tv in five and 
10 magazine markets respectively, to "punch up any holes in our 
advertising umbrella." 

Some 65 c /< of Simmons Co.'s total $3.5 million ad budget is spent 
on Beautyrest Mattresses. 

"Actually, the role of advertising in a 'considered purchase item 
like mattresses is fundamentally different from its role in impulse 
buying." Hubbell explained. "I started out years ago as a salesman 
for Colgate, so I've been on both sides of the fence. For a product 
like mattresses, the advertising generally is only as effective as the 
point-of-sale carry-through. Store A and Store B across the street 
from each other, say, get the same push from us in the way of maga- 
zine and radio-tv advertising. But store A resists our advertising and 
pushes some private brand, while Store B takes advantage of our 
merchandising support and goes all out for Simmons. We might 
sell isolated units through Store A, while Store B sells hundreds." 

To support this, Hubbell gave a virtually irresistible sales pitch, 
proving an adman is a salesman at heart. 

"At home it's not so easy," he grinned. "There I'm outnumbered." 
He was referring to his wife. son. and three daughters in Rye, N. Y. 

• • • 



& 




Independent 
in the nation's 





Market. . . 




The 50,000-watt "one-station net- 
work" places FIRST among all 
Los Angeles independent radio 
stations in the Pulse "Cumulative 
Pulse Audiences," Pulse Report 
for November. 1955. This Pulse 
Report shows KMPC leading all 
Los Angeles non-network sta- 
tions in weekly total of homes 
reached . . . 

Plus 

MORE out-of-home" auto radio 
listeners than ANY other South- 
ern California station including 
networks. And there are 3,199.- 
000 cars in KMPC's area ! 

. . . If you want to SELL 
Southern California . . . BU\ 

KMPC 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 



50,000 watts day 10.000 watts night 

Cene Autry, President 
R. O. Reynolds, Vice-President & Cen. Mgr 

REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY 
A.M. RADIO SALES 

•'The Pulse "Los Angeles Metropolitan Area 
Out-of-Home Radio Audience — Summer 1955" 



9 JANUARY 1956 



23 



PEMNSVLIAMA'C 



IM YOUfi PICTURE 



583,600 

1\/ Families 



WJAC-TV is the Number One 
Station not only in Johnstown, 
but in Altoona as well, and this 
one-two punch covers an area 
that rates 4th in the rich state 
of Pennsylvania, and 28th in 
the entire country. 

Well over half a million (583,- 
600 to be exact) television fam- 
ilies look to WJAC-TV for the 
best in television entertainment. 

Add to this the free bonus of 
WJAC-TV coverage into Pitts- 
burgh, and you have a total 
market for your sales message 
that just can't be overlooked, if 
you really want to tap the po- 
tential of Southwestern Penn- 
sylvania. 




Get full details from your KATZ man! 




by Joe Csida 
Can you get there and still be a nice guy? 

It is, as I write this, a little past the start of the new year, 
the time as everyone knows, of a looking ahead at the future, 
the summing up of the past. The time, if any, to get what 
might basically be interpreted as pollyannaism off one's 
chest. It seems fashionable in showbusiness — not excepting, 
and maybe especially — the radio-tv wing and the upper per- 
former and brass echelons — to be bitter and cynical and 
tough. In the past several months, in two different areas of 
the industry, tongue-in-cheek organizations were organized, 
which throw this fashion into sharp focus. 

Out in Hollywood, Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall, 
Frank Sinatra, Judy Garland, Sid Luft, Irving Lazar, Nat 
Benchley, David Niven and a couple of other characters as- 
sembled to form The Holmby Hills Rat Pack. Bogie, who is 
one of the Pack's moving spirits, stated the HHRP's reason 
for existence. "We're just people who admire ourselves," 
said he, "and don't care for any one else." 

Here in New York just a month or so before the Rat Pack 
conclave a group of key people in the music-record industry 
brought into being an organization mysteriously entitled 
F'EA. The publicized purpose of the group was to combat 
some of the more unsavory practices indulged in by certain 
recording executives and music publishers. 
{Please turn to page 88) 



Csida and Como 

say nice guys 

finish first 

Contention is that 
nice guys have hard 
time coming out on 
top. in citing Como 
cover story in last 
issue of Collier's, 
Csida delves into en- 
tertainment world to 
cite moral for those 
to whom success is 
of great importance. 




24 



SPONSOR 




JDon't send ei looy 
to do et 



work 



Apparently, it is recognized that a multiple number of smaller 

Georgia radio stations are indicated if one hopes to approach the 
effectiveness and economy of WSB Radio. This is a protective 
concept which has prevailed, ineffectively, for the past 20 years. 
No other Georgia radio station, or combination of Georgia stations, 
gives you as many listeners per dollar as you can get on WSB Radio. 
Ask your Petry man to show you the facts. 



Ji.T-LjA.TXTA. 



NBC affiliate. Represented by Petry. Affiliated with The Atlanta Journal and Constitution 



9 JANUARY 1956 



25 



BTV 



/ ,/ *•) | CHARLOTTE 

xl - 

Utiww , ^m^w To 



euWu 



tEfte Carolina!* 




Umm ,^mw\Q 



Published OTO by the Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company 



83 NEWSPAPERS CARRY 
WBTV PROGRAM LOGS 



Charles H. Crutchfield, Executive Vice 
President and General Manager of the 
Jefferson Standard Broadcasting Company, 
released today a complete list of newspapers 
carrying WBTV Program Logs and News 
Highlights. The eighty-three newspapers 
include: 



NORTH CAROLINA 

Albemarle Enterprise 

Albemarle, N. C. 

Anson Record 

Wadesboro, N. C. 

Ashevilie Citizen 

Asheville, N. C. 

Ashevilie News 

Asheville, N. C. 

Asheville Times 

Asheville, N. C. 

Belmont Banner 

Belmont, N. C. 

Charlotte News 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Charlotte Observer 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Charlotte Post 

Charlotte, N. C. 

Cleveland Times 

Shelby, N. C. 

Concord Tribune 

Concord, N. C. 

Durham Morning Herald 

Durham, N. C. 

Durham Observer 

Durham, N. C. 

Elkin Tribune 

Elkin, N. C. 

Fayetteville Observer 

Fayetteville, N. C. 

Gaston Citizen 

Gastonia, N. C. 

Gastonia Gazette 

Gastonia, N. C. 

Granite Falls Press 

Granite Falls, N. C. 

Greensboro Daily News 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Greensboro Record 

Greensboro, N. C. 

Hamlet News-Messenger 

Hamlet, N. C. 

Hendersonville Times-News 

Hendersonviile, N. C. 

Hickory Daily Record 

Hickory, N. C. 

High Point Enterprise 

High Point, N. C. 

Iredell Morning News 

Statesville, N. C. 

Kannapolis Daily Independent 

Kannapolis, N. C. 

Lenior News-Topic 

Lenior, N. C. 

Lexington Dispatch 

Lexington, N. C. 

Lincoln Times 

Lincolnton, N. C. 

Lumberton Post 

Lumberton, N. C. 

Mecklenburg Times 

Charlotte, N. C. 



Mocksville Enterprise 
Mocksville, N. C. 
Monroe Journal 
Monroe, N. C. 
Montgomery Herald 
Troy, N. C. 

Morganton News-Herald 
Morganton, N. C. 
Mount Holly News 
Mt. Holly, N. C. 
Newton Observer & 

News Enterprise 
Newton, N. C. 
Raleigh News & Observer 
Raleigh, N. C. 
Raleigh Times 
Raleigh, N. C. 
The Robesonian 
Lumberton, N. C. 
Rockingham Post-Dispatch 
Rockingham, N. C. 
Rutherford County News 
Rutherfordton, N. C. 
Salisbury Evening Post 
Salisbury, N. C. 
Sanford Herald 
Sanford, N. C. 
Shelby Daily Star 
Shelby, N. C. 
Statesville Daily Record 
Statesville, N. C. 
Twin City Sentinel 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Winston-Salem Journal 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

SOUTH CAROLINA 

Anderson Daily Mail 
Anderson, S. C. 
Anderson Independent 
Anderson, S. C. 
Andrews Star 
Andrews, S. C. 
Camden Citizen 
Camden, S. C. 
Charleston Evening Post 
Charleston, S. C. 
Charleston News & Courier 
Charleston, S. C. 
Cheraw Chronicle 
Cheraw, S. C. 
Chester Reporter 
Chester, S. C. 
Chesterfield Advertiser 
Chesterfield, S. C. 
Clover Herald 
Clover, S. C. 
Columbia Post 
Columbia, S. C. 
Columbia Record 
Columbia, S. C. 
Columbia State 
Columbia, S. C. 




Pictured above is the $l! 2 Million Jefferson Standard 
Broadcasting Company building. Operating from these 
kingsize facilities, WBTV serves more than 500,000 tele- 
vision families in its 100 UV/M area! 



Florence Morning News 
Florence, S. C. 
Fort Mill Times 
Fort Mill, S. C. 
Gaffney Ledger 
Gaffney, S. C. 
Greenville News 
Greenville, S. C. 
Greenville Observer 
Greenville, S. C. 
Greenwood Index-Journal 
Greenwood, S. C. 
Lancaster News 
Lancaster, S. C. 
Newberry Journal 
Newberry, S. C. 
Pageland Journal 
Pageland, S. C. 
Spartanburg Herald 
Spartanburg, S. C. 
Spartanburg Journal 
Spartanburg, S. C. 
Suburban News 
Columbia, S. C. 
Union Daily Times 
Union, S. C. 



GEORGIA 

Augusta Herald 
Augusta, Georgia 



TENNESSEE 

Bristol Virginia-Tennessean 
Bristol, Tennessee 
Elizabethton Star 
Altamont, Tennessee 
Kingsport Times-Ne^ws 
Kingsport, Tennessee 
Morristown Sun 
Morristown, Tennessee 
Mountain City Tomahawk 
Mountain City, Tennessee 



VIRGINIA 

Bristol Herald-Courier 
Bristol, Virginia 
Roanoke Times 
Roanoke, Virginia 
Scott County News 
Gate City, Virginia 



MOST UNIQUE AND EFFECT 
PROMOTIONAL OPERATION I 
THE BUSINESS... 



Advertisers launching campaigns over Sta 
WBTV reap the promotional benefit 
eighty-three Carolina newspapers wl 
carry WBTV Program Logs. Twenty-i 
of these newspapers regularly feature 
gram news and photos in special televi 
highlight columns. 






This healthy viewer interest in televi 
program news has been skillfully cultivc 
since 1949 by a full-manned WBTV pro 
tion operation. Televiewers in this $2 bil 
retail sales market have requested logs 
program highlights — newspaper editors h 
complied. 

Judged to be one of the most unique 
effective promotion operations in the bi 
ness, the eight-man department prov:s 
full advertiser service in on-lhe-air pro> 
tion, publicity, research, merchandis !, 
and newspaper-audience promotion. 

Combine this great area station "impa 
advertising with such potent promotion . 
watch sales "zoom" in this robust Caro 
television market! 



SUCH POTENT PROMOTION 




Graphically shown at left are the eigl'- 
three newspapers located in WBTV's 
UV/M area. Proof positive that WBf 
advertisers reach a bonus television-c • 
scious audience that never shows up in* 
counts and market data. 

Call: WBTV or CBS Television Spot Sai 



n 



rp 



9 ANUARY 1956 



PART FOUR 




Did high iv budgets 
force agency revolution? 

What lies behind addition of agency marketing services is 
covered here from two opposite points of view 

by Ben Bodec 

That sweeping changes in traditional functions are 
under way at major agencies has been the premise of 
this series. But what lies behind the change? Did the 
agencies act out of altruistic desire to expand the 
services furnished clients? Or were they pushed by the clients? 
And to what degree did television with its high costs create client 
pressure? There are some who say tv provides the main impetus 
for the broadening of services, that advertisers demand a greater 
variety of services when they use tv heavily because they feel 
agencies are making unusual profits from the medium. This point 
of view is presented on the following page. But it is only one side 
of the story. Along side you'll find the answering view of those 
who contend that many other factors are more basic in the agen- 
cies' responsiveness to the exigencies of the so-called marketing 
revolution. And that any opposing view reflects a narrow and 
extreme position. Also contained in this fourth part of sponsor's 
series on the Agency in Transition is a summary of the six prime 
ways that television has had a dynamically stimulating effect on 
marketing practices today. (Turn page for start of the debate.) 




► ►► 



iPiit tv casts farce new services an agencies ? 



YES: services are move to 

JUSTIFY HIGH PROFITS TV BRINGS 



NO: AGENCIES CHANGED WITH 
GROWTH IN NATIONAL ECONOMY 



• Composite viewpoint quoted below is based on 
thinking of admen from client side who view marketing 
services as growing out of client tv-sparked desires. 

"I believe agencies had to go into broader 
marketing services. Television forced it. All agencies 
haven't broadened their scope. But the move is on. 

"Television put the finger on the agency. Ten years 
ago the big shops were heavily in print, same in 
radio. Then came tv. The pattern changed — is 
changing. Billings jumped sky high. This meant 
agencies had to add personnel. Early tv was trial by 
error. More people were needed to take care of mistakes. 

"With more people came a certain direction as to 
where the agency was going. The area of marketing 
was the logical place. Reason? Simple. The more 
an agency is integrated into management, the more 
it has a hold on the account. Marketing — actually, 
you could give it 10 other names — became the 
base. More research, more merchandising, more 
counseling on everything from employe salaries to 



• Composite viewpoint below reflects thinking of 
agency executives who say it's not tv profits but 
changes in economy which underlie expansion of 
agency services which were reported in this series. 

"There's no doubt but what television changed 
the agencies' operation. Agencies were hit broad- 
side with tv. They had to change or lose out. It's 
just that simple. Tv budgets are high. No denying 
that. So are the results tv gets. But simply because 
the budgets are high doesn't mean agency profits 
are the same. A lot of people assume, clients among 
them, that so-and-so show costing, say, $300,000 
for a one-time shot puts $45,000 right into the 
agency's profit column. 

"There's no denying that you make more on some 
accounts than you do on others. What's wrong 
with that? Not a thing. All business follows the 
same practice. But one thing's sure: It takes more 
to get more. Same since time began. 

"Figures say so-and-so agency did $150,000,000 







:/ s 



how big a manufacturer's field force should be. 
"But that's only part of the setup. Tv represents 
anywhere from 40 to 65% of the total billings of a 
vast majority of agencies. Most of this money 
comes from the networks. Now, the networks pretty 
much control what they produce. This means a 
lot to the agency in terms of profit. 

"The agency needs only to provide commercials 
for these shows. It gets 15% on top of the production 
cost plus fees for out-of-pocket expense. Then it 
gets 15% on time and the high-priced network- 
controlled program. When a client spends $5 million 
in tv and the agency gets 15% or roughly $750,000, 
you can see where the client begins to wonder. 

"That's where marketing stepped in. The client 
pays more, but gets more. It's the Madison 
Avenue baker's dozen. 

"And there's one more thing. The 15% may have 
outlived its usefulness. Tv may have changed 
this. But maybe it can stay the same with market- 
ing tossed in, 

"One thing is sure. The greater number of 
services didn't just spring from kindness. Once 
they're there, though, you can be sure they'll stay. 
No one ever punched Santa Claus in the nose yet." 



in billing. Yet their net profit is about 1.5%. How 
does this compare with, say, General Motors or a 
lot of the hot-shot tv operations. As I said before, 
it takes more to get — and hold — the big ones. 
And I'm not being snide either. 

"The greater the billings on one account, the more 
the problems. They go hand in glove. Tv forced 
more activity and the agencies expanded services. 
But it was a natural expansion. The talk is that the 
agencies resorted to some sort of cloak and dagger 
stuff. Nothing further from the truth. 

"The very nature of tv forced better research, 
stronger merchandising, greater counseling with man- 
agement on the whole business function. With this 
came more people, more activity, more depth, if you 
will, to the whole advertising effort. 

"There's one more thing. Advertising today 
reflects the tremendous economic tempo of the 
country. Advertising is bigger, broader, more in- 
tense and more selling. If advertising seems hypoed, 
it's just joining the throng. A marketing revolution? 
No. It's just an economic evolution with the 
agencies going along with the act. And forget about 
the theory that agencies are reaping high profits 
on network tv. We only wish it worked out that way." 



28 



For editorial presenting sponsor's own view on the question, see page 108. 



SPONSOR 




IVJARKISTINQ 



CI-IANOIES TV 



ORIZATISI) 



J. Sales forces: The change in 
scope and nature of field sales forces 
has been quite marked, especially in 
the packaged grocery field. Tele- 
vision's dynamic power to pre-sell the 
consumer and obtain quick acceptance 
from the retailer has made it possible 
for the manufacturer to put his prod- 
uct in distribution without having to 
maintain as large a percentage of high- 
salaried specialty salesmen as was re- 
quired before tv. He saves money 
by replacing them with the lower- 
salaried service salesmen. Their main 
function is to make sure that the re- 
tail channels — particularly supermar- 
kets and chains — keep an adequate 
slock of the product on hand and to 
make sure they get proper shelf dis- 
play and favorable in-store promotion. 

Roughly speaking, such food proces- 
sing organizations as General Foods, 
National Biscuit Co. and Standard 
Brands now find it expedient to oper- 
ate on a ratio of 75 top level account 
salesmen to 300 service salesmen. 
Television's impact can also be cred- 
ited with a further field-selling ex- 
pense reduction. The manufacturer 
has been able to turn more and more 
of his smaller retail outlet provision- 
ing to brokers. 

In the cosmetic, toiletries and drug 



product field the situation is some- 
what different. If you handle a single 
line, as happened in the case of Hazel 
Bishop, the forceful sales aid pro- 
vided by television, will permit you 
to reduce the field force to practically 
nothing. But a firms carrying a full 
line, like Revlon and Lehn & Fink, 
have no alternative. The field platoon 
remains almost exclusively made up 
of specialty salesmen. Where tele- 
vision exerts its influence is this: a 
spectacular success in one specialty — 
like a lipstick- — makes it easier for 
the salesman to induce the dealer to 
stock more of the firm's other prod- 
ucts. 

2. Distribution: The ability of tele- 
vision to accelerate sales and the high 
cost of the medium has impelled the 
advertiser to revamp his distribution 
function in several respects. He must 
allow more time in planning and de- 
vising his ad campaign and for get- 
ting his new product and merchan- 
dising material to the wholesaler and 
point-of-sale — thereby avoiding the 
the costly annoyance of letting supply 
run behnd demand and the loss of the 
dealer's goodwill. (An insight on how 
this frequently occurs is graphically 
illustrated in the series of statements 
from druggists contained in the spon- 



sor Asks page of the 3 October 1955 
issue.) 

Economics of television advertising 
has also made it imperative that the 
product or brand being introduced be 
stocked in at least 70% of the avail- 
able retail outlets in the target area 
before the tv campaign breaks. Prior 
to tv a quotient of 30-40% retail cov- 
erage was considered ample. 

Breakdowns in the distribution time- 
table since the full emergence of tv 
have proved pust as costly and em- 
barrassing for the grocery field and 
not a few such manufacturers admit 
that the problem is still one of their 
major headaches. 

3. Market planning: Television 
has exercised an appreciable change 
in the staking out of the target area. 
No longer does the manufacturer de- 
cide on the geographical pattern for 
the introduction of a new product or 
brand and then assign his agency to 
tailor tv network facilities according- 
ly. The accepted procedure is now 
just the reverse: find out what markets 
are available in a network lineup and 
then build the target area around these 
availabilities. And where the lineup 
does not provide essential "push" mar- 
kets fill in the chinks with tv spot or a 
{Please turn to page LOO) 









Do you want reprints of this series? 

Many readers have already expressed interest in re- 
prints of this series and SPONSOR will make them avail- 
able if sufficient interest is indicated. Address your 
requests to sponsor at 40 E. 49th St., New York 17, N. Y. 



Why accounts are shifting today 28 Nov. 

2 Marketing: agency tool or cliche? 12 Dec. 

3 # Psychiatrist and the account executive 26 Dec. 

4 Did tv costs force services? this issue 



9 JANUARY 1956 



29 



Max Factor had the $114,000 answei 

With 29% increase in sales volume after first full year of spot television, cosn \ 



IV 



rts 



id. 

raJ 
*de 

it 




9 Months' Earnings Up 34% 
as Sales Increase 29% 

Max Factor & Co. reported 
yesterday that sales in the nine- 
month period ended Sept. 30 rose 
29 per cent over the same period 
last year, while epwings were 
34 per cent higher. The result, 
according' to Max Factor Jr., 
president of the Hollywood cos- 
metic concern, was the best nine 
months in the company's history. 

Net earnings, after am^Hiza- 
tic ' of goodwill amotr to 



abl 
the 
wr 
U 

i 
ing 
po 



3 

HI' 



2 W network television show to call 
your own. 

No glamorous star to sell for you. 

No regular, well-known time slot for 
people to remember. 

And, to top it all. one of your com- 
petitors has not only all of these, but 
the show of the season. 

But the only payoff as far as Max 
Factor and its agency. Doyle. Dane 
Bernbach. are concerned, is the results. 
Do they come in the store next morn- 
ing and ask for the product? 

Answer: See above clipping. After 
one year of television. Factors sales 
increased 29$ • It was. in fact, the big- 
gest increase in the firms history. And 
the firm expects the years total sales 
to top $29-million. 

Coincidence? 

Says Ned Doyle, exec vice president 
of DDB: "We haven't seen figures for 
the final quarter yet. but it seems 1955 
will turn out to be a year in which 
Factor showed substantial gains in its 
staple items. And those are the ones 
we featured on tv dav in-dav out." 

Further proof that client and agency 
credit tv with this happy development 
is the heft) hike television is getting in 
the 1956 budget: a 30% increase from 
SI. 5 million in 1955 tc over $2 million 
this year. That's more than 50% of 
the over-all appropriation of S3. 5 mil- 
lion. 



30 



How will the\ spend it? 

Before last year the cosmetic manu- 
facturer had given tv only a trial whirl 
with a campaign for "Erace," a prod- 
uct to conceal blemishes, dark shadows 
and aging lines. At the same time a 
heavy newspaper schedule plus a 
spread in Life were used. Results were 
so convincing, says Account Executive 
Ed Russell, they decided to add tele- 
vision for the entire line. (Until Jan- 
uary. 1955 DDB shared the Max Factor 
account with Young & Rubicam, the 
latter handling "Creme Puff" and 
''Pancake.") 

At this point the crucial question 
arose: spot or program? 

Says Do\le: "Factor hadn't been on 
tv to any extent. But we'd seen Revlon 
flop four times with a network show 
before $64,000 Question, and I un- 
derstand that Charles Revson had 
made up his mind that Question would 
be his last try. Also. Hazel Bishop 
had very little luck with spectaculars. 

"On the other hand, we had been 
successful with whatever spot tv Ave 
used. 

"When \ ou get down to it. the one 
argument for sponsoring a network 
show is that the dealers like it. Well, 
that's not necessarily true. The only 
time the dealers go for network — or 
any other kind of advertising, for that 
matter — is when it brings in the busi- 
ness. 

"We decided to go all out for spot." 

I Ed. Note: Of recent interest was a 
pre-Christmas report datelined Salt 
Lake City, published in Women's Wear 
Daily: "Buyers give tv advertising a 
nice pat on the back and sav response 
to several programs and to individual 
spots just starting to show here was 
felt almost immediately. Programs 
mentioned were Revlon's $64,000 
Question, the Hazel Bishop program. 
Max Factor's short commercials, and 
Chance of a Lifetime") 

Basic plan, to be repeated this \ ear. 



is a y ear-around schedule in the top 07 
markets. These markets will include 
all the major metropolitan areas, with 
a minimum of three or four announce- 
ments I minutes and 20's I per week in 
each. Preferred time is early evening 
from 7:30 to 10:00 — which will get 
75% of the schedule I second choice, 
if these slots are unavailable, is the 
10:00-10:30 p.m. period). The re- 
maining 25' ', will be spread out during 
the afternoon. 

Career girls and young housewives, 
it is felt, are easiest to reach alter the 
day's big chores are done but before 
they settle into their late evening rou- 
tine or whatever it is they settle into. 
Morning, it is thought, gets "ear" time 
but not enough "eye"' time and, of 
course, it's evening for the men's line. 

Buying pattern: The goal is 100 rat- 
ing points in each market. That may 
mean three announcements in one mar- 



Founder Max Factor Sr. and one of his 
early motion picture subjects, Joan Crawford 




id tv impact 



mifaciurer ups air budget 



ket, eight in another — 10, 12, 15 — any 
number needed to total 100 points. 
Why 100 points? Neither client nor 
agency will reveal the reasoning he- 
hind this formula, but it is believed 
that they have been able to obtain 
highly satisfactory results with it in 
most markets where this rating goal 
has been achieved. 

In addition to this year-'round strat- 
egy, a heavy schedule is added during 
the Christmas. Mother's Day and Fa- 
ther's Day buying seasons. 

To date, the agency has been success- 
ful in getting most of the time slots it 
wants. And now that Max Factor has 
been a regular tv customer for a full 
year, it is felt that stations will be even 
more co-operative. 

Likewise Factor's dealers. In the 
billion-dollar cosmetics and toiletries 
industry, Factor is thiid in sales of 
cosmetics alone, ranking behind Avon 
and Revlon. In the make-up depart- 
ment, Factor is way out front, with 
50 r / more sales volume than its near- 
est competitor. It distributes through 
15,000 of the nation's 50,000 drug 
stores and through 3.500 department 
stores. Last year these stores shared 
heavily in the company's co-operative 
advertising plan. This year in view 
of the stepped up competition through- 
out the entire industry. Factor expects 
them to take an even more active part. 
A large crew of salesmen will be on 
the local scene pushing this effort. 

One of the oldest manufacturers in 
the business, Max Factor has long had 
a good reputation among dealers and 
consumers. But loyalty? 

"'Hardly,"' says Doyle. "Few prod- 
ucts have such disloyal customers as 
cosmetics and make-up simply because 
{Please turn to page 951 



Storyboard, right, outlines minute tv 
commercial for exotic Electrique line of 
cologne and gift sets. Created on basis of 
original newspaper and magazine ads, it 
heightens mood by adding impact of sound 

9 JANUARY 1956 





French "Electrique" song provides 
background for romantic garden scene. 




Flash of lightning frightens 
girl* She grabs man. 




Lightning continues.. 




...as product appears. 



When sales are down the station manager takes 
and all agree each sale now is costlier, tougher 



Radio stations U.S.A. 



There's no headache 
sales can't cure 



True, programing, rates, budget pose problems, 
but real focus today is on reaching clients 




mL verybody thinks that a radio sta- 
tion manager today has nothing but 
bottles of aspirin on his desk. 

This isn't true. 

Actually when the radio station 
manager comes in to work in the 
morning he just takes one aspirin 
. . . about the size of a football. 

The one big headache boils down 
to selling. Administration, sure. The 
hot d.j. somebody else is wooing, 
sure. Unions, sure. But the thing 
which makes the station manager — 
and every other station executive — 
walk the walls is the simple fact that 
today radio must sell hard to live. 



It's proving a nice living for many 
stations which last year beat their 
previous all-time highs. But even 
for the independent which has a wait- 
ing line during the most popular time 
periods, the present era of adjustment 
to television puts station manage- 
ment's emphasis on sales. 

When the radio station manager's 
got the sales licked, he can pretty well 
take care of the other headaches. And 
these are numerous as this sixth part 
in sponsor's series on advertising 
headaches will indicate (For dates of 
other parts in series see below. Com- 
ing next issue: headaches of tv sta- 




ADVERTISING HEADACHES 

A series of articles designed to put in perspective 
the air media problems of: 

I. Timebuyers 31 October 

II. Account executives 14 November 

III. Ad managers 28 November 

IV. Representatives 12 December 

V. Radio-tv directors 26 December 

VI. Radio station execs this issue 

VII. TV station execs 23 January 



tion executives.) in this article. 

Here's what radio station execu- 
tives had to say about this headache: 
Increased cost of making sales: 
The cost of selling radio is up in two 
ways: (1) need for tailor-made pre- 
sentations to sell clients on using 
radio in the first place and a particu- 
lar station in the second; (2) cost in 
terms of man-hours expended for 
selling. 

"Each dollar of sale costs more to- 
day," most station managers agree. 

Some large stations have added to 
their sales, research, sales promotion 
staffs. In smaller stations the sales 
manager takes on a bigger job. The 
radio station manager himself gets in- 
volved in special sales more frequent- 
ly than before. 

Buying prejudices: "Since some 
advertisers seem to spend only 'what's 
left over' on radio, they try to make 
ever) dollar of a restricted budget 
work overtime," the veteran manager 
of one independent station told SPON- 
SOR. 

"This inspires demands for 7:00 
a.m. to 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. to 
7:00 p.m. time by short-term adver- 
tisers which a station often can't de- 
liver without overcrowding." 

There are numerous radio buying 

SPONSOR 



Late delivery of e.t.'s or scripts adds to headaches of 
station exec's, who have to camp at post office door 








DD 

8 us. 

POST 

OMCI: 




h t rating service do you get?" Station's ratings ride 
c down, depends on rating service, hampering sales 



"I'm a prisoner of time" say all station execs, trying to 
break through prejudices for early-morn, against night 



cliches which radio station managers 
and their sales staffs try to fight with 
creative presentations and extra re- 
search. Many station managers point 
out that the toughest job today is to 
sell advertisers on a balanced sched- 
ule. 

"Small spenders love to concentrate 
on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fri- 
days," said a West Coast station man- 
ager. "In our case, at least, these 
days are already loaded. So you 
have to decide whether to humor ad- 
vertisers and overcrowd, or stick to 
your principles and get a reputation 
of being 'high hat' with old friends 
and customers." 

Every station manager faces the 
problem of setting sales policy for 
the station. If his salesmen are 
forced to refuse an account, he hears 
the ultimate complaint. If he squeezes 
an account into a popular time, 
chances are the other clients will 
gripe to him about "lessened effec- 
tiveness." 

The simple truth about the biggest 
prejudice and headache was wrapped 
up by an independent station opera- 
tor when he told sponsor: "In the 
old days we sold clients or agencies 
on use of our particular station. To- 
day we've often got to sell them on 

9 JANUARY 1956 



use of the medium before continuing." 

More people to sell: This is the 
particular headache of stations in 
markets close to national clients. 

Said one major network affiliate: 
"After we've sold the timebuyer, we've 
got to sell account men and clients 
as well. Sometimes we see a half 
dozen men before there's an order for 
a schedule." 

In the case of stations removed 
from buying centers these sales bur- 
dens revert mainly to the rep. 

"But," said one Southern station 
manager, "you can bet we ourselves 
travel more today than 10 years ago. 
We've got to back up the rep with 
our own personal contacts." 

Servicing accounts: Most radio 
station managers today agree that 
"getting a schedule's the first step. 
Serving lasts as long as the schedule's 
on the air, and usually you keep it up 
afterwards even without renewals to 
presell for the next season." 

Such servicing includes more than 
the big merchandising job many 
clients expect from radio stations 
today. 

"On a regional account, for exam- 
ple, we have the salesman visit the 



distributors and retail outlets in our 
market," one Midwestern station man 
said. "The main idea is to try to 
show the client results and these come 
through retailer comments as well as 
product sales figures. Where it's a 
headache for me is that the same 
salesman who has to follow up on one 
client could be selling another in that 
time." 

Part of the extra servicing entails 
bringing talent to sales meetings of 
regional and national advertisers. 

"That's part of the routine that 
takes up extra time for the station's 
salesmen, but also the particular talent 
involved," one metropolitan network 
affiliate said, echoing the views of 
most stations with regional or nation- 
al accounts. "If it's a big client, I go 
to his major sales meetings too." 

Balancing accounts on the air: 

It's a juggling act, station men say. 

"It's not uncommon these days to 
find Thursday and Friday schedules 
carrying 40 or 50% more commer- 
cials than those on Monday and Tues- 
day," one station operator told SPON- 
SOR. 

"When you start adding to that 
situation the emphasis on particular 
(Please turn to page 98) 



33 








■1 ™ 



«■ 




"THE HEART OF A HOME IS IN 
THE HOME WITH A HEART" 

Slogan formed backbone of Del Webb saturation 
campaign. Tom Breen, sales manager, 
readies new development project. 
Breen stands in front of 
*V Camelback Village 



Would you let 
pur radio announcer 

go (his far ? 

Del Webb builders allowed a no-script 

approach and got startling results in a period 

when sales should have taken a slump 

34 



M ou're driving along Camelback 
Road in Arizona's famous Valley of 
the Sun, not far from Phoenix. 

Straight ahead, there's picturesque 
Camelback Mountain, one of the land- 
marks of the Old West, splashed with 
the Technicolor of an Arizona sunset. 

But, if your car radio's on and 
you're tuned to Phoenix's KRIZ, your 
attention will probably be directed to 
something new over on your left — 
Camelback Village, a real estate de- 
velopment built by Del Webb. 

Webb is no ordinary builder; co- 
owner of the New York Yankees, he 
runs one of the world's biggest con- 
struction companies. Among his latest 
jobs: the Beverly Hilton Hotel and the 
Union Oil Building in Los Angeles. 

And Camelback Village is no ordi- 
nary home development. It's been 
gathering national attention as a test- 
ing ground for the newest in General 
Electric household appliances and for 
one of the most off-beat selling ap- 
proaches in spot radio. 

According to Tom Breen. sales man- 
ager for Del Webb Homes. "We're 
spending about one-third of the per- 
centage of sales that most builders 

SPONSOR 



allocate to avertising, and we're get- 
ting about three times the results of 
ordinary advertising for homes in the 
same price class." 

The saturation announcement drive 
on KRIZ has had a real payoff: Breen 
has been selling at least one $13,270 
lor more) home per day. 

The "Super Six": If the airselling 
technique developed by KRIZ and Del 
Webb officials could be reduced to a 
single phrase, it might be this: 

"Look, ma, no script!" 

The construction firm this past sum- 
mer had one of the heaviest schedules 
on the station — 48 participations 
weekly, costing about $1,000 a month 
and representing 75/V of the firm's ad 
budget — but none of it was done from 
prepared copy. 

General Manager Howard Loeb of 
KRIZ, a 24-hour independent, believes 
firmly in another approach, that of 
complete informality. 

The station has six announcers who 
are actually better classified as "air 
salesmen."" They work with "fact 
sheets." and ad-lib their live announce- 
ments. 

This is a blanket policy on the 
station. "As part of his job, each of 
our 'Super Six' salesmen is required 
to visit the place of business of our 
station clients, and to get thoroughly 
acquainted with the operation and 
personality of the business," Commer- 
cial Manager Sheldon Engel reports. 

"We don't have a single copywriter 
on our staff. Clients submit fact sheets 
and, after they've been briefed in a 
personal visit, our 'Super Six' sales- 
men ad-lib commercials from these 
client notes. Usually, they run about 
a minute. Some run a few seconds 
long. But our air salesmen don't hesi- 
tate to stop talking when they've had 
their say, even if it runs a little short. 
Advertisers don't complain about 'short 
commercials" because they're getting 
results." 

The stations sextet of air personali- 
ties holds daily meetings with Manager 
Loeb and Commercial Chief Engel. 
Current campaigns, such as the Del 
Webb drive, are discussed. Those not 
producing top results for advertisers 
are discussed and analyzed, and 
changed where necessary. 

From the station's standpoint, the 
approach has been highly successful. 
KRIZ gets the highest local rate of 
any of the 9 outlets in the area, and is 
talking about a radio rate increase. 



And the station's availabilities are 
virtually sold out. 

From the client's standpoint, as in 
the case of Del Webb's Camelback Vil- 
lage, the "no script" approach spelled 
a record pace in Phoenix real estate 
history — at a time when sales of homes 
should have taken a normal summer 
slump. 

Mew gimmick: KRIZ and the Del 

Webb executives built their radio ap- 
proach around one of the slickest 
appliances to come from giant General 
Electric: a combination single unit that 
consists of an automatic range with 
oven, dishwasher, clothes washer and 
dryer, and garbage disposal unit, cabi- 
nets and sink — a $1,500 package. 

Breen heard about the new GE 
units, and ordered several scores of 
them, long before they had been offi- 
cially introduced elsewhere. 

In Louisville. Ky., where General 
Electric has its Kitchen Center Divi- 



sion, officials filled the order, and then 
started keeping a close eye on the 
Phoenix "pilot operation" to see how 
the new unit would catch on with the 
home-buying public. 

Breen had used KRIZ before to sell 
homes in other sections, and had found 
the station's informal approach highly 
successful. Thus it was that Breen met 
with KRIZ executives to hatch a selling 
campaign for Camelback Village. 

This was the plan worked out: 

1. Del Webb would use a saturation 
drive on the station, spotted through- 
out the broadcast day in recorded 
music shows. Four dozen participa- 
tions weekly were to be used. 

2. A novel theme was worked out. 
The GE unit was to be known as 
"Heart of the Home." 

3. In radio terms, the "Heart" idea 
was to be carried through with a 
special audio gimmick: the tape-re- 

I Please turn to page 93) 




THIS STRATEGY 
SOLD HOUSES FOR 
PHOENIX BUILDER 



1. Saturation drive set at 48 participations weekly. 
Novel theme built around kitchen unit (Heart of the 
Home) introduced to give campaign positive identity. 

2. Impact-producing audio device selected. Tape- 
recorded sound effect of heart beat used to open and 
close commercials to hypo "Heart of the Home" theme. 

3. Station air salesmen toured builder's homes. Typi- 
cal home buyers' questions answered to give commercial 
direction. Fact sheets were prepared for air salesmen. 

4. Teaser barrage launched around heartbeat sound. 
Question "Where is the heart of the home?" asked be- 
hind sound. Selling tack switched after teaser campaign. 

5. Commercial took final form with heartbeat, slogan 
(The Heart of a Home is in the Home with a Heart) and 
creation of fictitious character for further identification. 

6. Great latitude given air salesmen in copy presenta- 
tion. Individual approaches stressed. Outdoor display 
to link commercials to actual homes to guide visitors. 



9 JANUARY 1956 



35 



The diary of a tv commercial 

Day-by-day entries in this personal diary tell why it takes months, 
money and nearly 50 men to produce a one-minute tv announcement 



wW hy does it take from three to 10 weeks to make a commercial? 

Why does producing a few feet of film involve some 50 men, 
skilled in over a dozen different crafts? 

To provide perspective on these and similar questions, sponsor 
followed production of a series of Lucky Strike commercials through 
step by step from start to finish. The commercials are probably familiar 
to most readers. They are part of the current "It's light-up time" Lucky 
Strike campaign and have been appearing this season. 

SPONSOR chose a series of familiar commercials so readers could 
keep the end product in mind while following the day-by-day story 
below. The story is told in four stages: (1) planning, (2) pre-produc- 
tion, (3) production, (4) finishing. Scene from commercial below. 



/• planning 



17 May A meeting takes place at 
American Tobacco involving the ad- 
vertising department as well as Tax 
Cumings, account executive for Lucky 
Strike at BBDO and H. "Travie" 
Traviesas, tv account executive. These 
are the decisions which emerge: 

• In keeping with Luckies' success- 
fully tested formula of using from 10 
to 12 new and different commercial 
treatments each year, six are to be 
put into work now for use in the fall. 



Lucky commercials took four months to produce 

Much planning, more work goes into the production of 
a single minute tv commercial. Pre-planning pays off in 
lowered film costs. Note hoiv closely beach scene in story 
board cut, right, matches commercial tv print be'ow. 







• The "It's light-up time" theme is 
to be continued. 

• Commercials will present unknown 
actors in familiar situations. 

• New music will be composed. 

• Dorothy Collins assisted by a sing- 
ing group will again do the vocal back- 
grounds. 

• All six ideas will be produced in 
one-minute lengths, and two will also 
be made into 30-second versions. 




18 May Armed with this informa- 
tion Cumings and Traviesas call for 
a meeting with Whit Hobbs v.p. and 
creative copy chief at BBDO, and turn 
the project over to him for the de- 
velopment of ideas. 

The same day Hobbs and three of 
his copy writers (all old hands on the 
Lucky Strike account) use up half a 
carton of the client's product and a 
dozen cups of coffee kicking around 
some tentative ideas for the series of 
commercials. Among them: 

A couple at the beach. . . 

Two men on a suspended scaffold 
handling a 24-sheet poster (a Lucky 
Strike poster, of course) . . . 

A factory worker on a coffee 
break. . . 

A group of ranch hands with a 
horse. . . 

The lady of an aristocratic home 
in New Orleans or Boston. . . 

A pilot and co-pilot. . . 

A taxi driver and his fare. . . 

After several hours and armed with 
pages of notes, the copy writers go 
back to their respective typewriters to 
further develop some of these ideas 
and to add others as they go along. 



The week of 19 May Hobbs, in 
constant touch with his writers, re- 
jects, accepts or suggests improve- 
ments as ideas take a more finalized 
form. Toward the end of the week, 
11 ideas emerge as scripts. 

27 May Whit Hobbs, Cumings and 
Traviesas discuss the final ideas. 
Cumings suggests certain changes 
based on his knowledge of the client's 
tastes, then he and Traviesas give the 
"go ahead." 

29 May The suggested changes hav- 
ing been incorporated, the 11 scripts 
reach the desk of Bernie Haber (in 
charge of tv production at BBDO). 

Based on his experience and knowl- 
edge of film production, Haber studies 
the ideas for production difficulties 
and possible suggestions for cost- 
saving. He times each idea to make 
sure it can be made into a one-minute 
announcement as well as cut down to 

30 seconds. 

1 June Suggested changes are dis- 
cussed with Hobbs and incorporated 
into the scripts. 

2 June The scripts are now turned 
over to the art department for devel- 
opment into story-boards. 

7 June The art department turns 
scripts and story-boards back to Whit 
Hobbs, who in turn takes them to 
Traviesas for presentation to the cli- 
ent. Traviesas discusses the story- 
boards with Tax Cumings and again, 
knowing their client, they suggest 
some changes to be made in the art 
work. The story-boards travel back 
to the art department. 

13 June The final scripts, corrected 
story-boards along with Haber 's tim- 
ing notes and a preliminary cost esti- 
mate go to Cumings and Traviesas 
for presentation to the client. 

17 June (One month after the ini- 
tial ad meeting at American Tobacco) 
Cumings and Traviesas walk into the 
crucial meeting with the client, where 
they must present the agency's wares 
for approval, rejection, change or 
suggestion. 

By 6:15 p.m. they breathe a sigh 
of relief. Six of the 11 ideas have 
been agreed upon and approved unani- 
mously. But now checking must begin. 



Leading tv film labs 
serving agencies, clients 

Here are top 21 film labs 
processing tv film activity in an a. 
Labs listed do all work from 
first print to final commercial. 

Ace Film Laboratories, Inc. 

Circle Film Labs, Inc. 

Color Service Co. 

Consolidated Film Industries 

DeLuxe Labs, Inc. 

DU-Art Film Laboratories, Inc. 

Guffanti Film Labs, Inc. 

Film Products Laboratories 

Lab-TV 

Major Film Laboratories, Inc. 

Malcolm Film Laboratories, Inc. 

Mecca Film Laboratories, Inc. 

Mercury Film Laboratories, Inc. 

Movielab Film Laboratories, Inc. 

Pathe Laboratories, Inc. 

Precision Film Laboratories 

Rainbowlab, Inc. 

Swift Motion Picture Labs, Inc. 

Titra Sound Corporation 

Tri Art Coolr Corp. 

Video Film Laboratories 



18 June In the hands of the client's 
advertising department the scripts and 
story-boards receive a continuity 
check, to make sure that nothing con- 
tained in the audio or visual content 
is contrary to the client's policy or 
possibly offensive to any group. 

19 June Scripts are turned over to 
the client's legal department for a 
check on all copy statements. 

21 June A formal meeting is ar- 
ranged, at which the client's advertis- 
ing department, Cumings and Travi- 
esas as well as Paul M. Hahn, presi- 
dent of American Tobacco are to be 
present and discuss the commercials 
in detail. But Paul Hahn is out of 
town on business and the meeting is 
set for the 27th. 

27 June Mr. Hahn, having re- 
turned to New York, attends the meet- 
ing, studies and discusses the scripts 
and photostated story-boards and be- 
ing in agreement with his own and 
the agency's staff, gives the green 
light for actual production. 

(Article continues next page) 



9 JANUARY 1956 



37 



DIARY OF A TV COMMERCIAL CONT D 

28 June Scripts and story-boards 
find their way back to the desk of 
Bernie Haber at BBDO, who is now 
responsible for follow-through. 

The same day As soon as mimeo- 
graphed scripts are available, a set is 
sent to at least three production com- 
panies who. according to Haber 's ex- 
perience, are qualified to handle the 
job. They are invited to submit bids. 
An additional set is sent to Ray- 
mond Scott to permit him to prepare 
a cost estimate for the musk 1 . 

30 June Haber receives cost esti- 
mates (bids) from the producers and 
he calls Traviesas, giving him the fig- 
ures and recommending that Screen 
Gems be selected. His past work with 
that company convinces him that, in 
this particular case, Screen Gems will 
be the ideal producer. 

Traviesas now call? the client's ad 
department, informs them of the bids 
and of Haber's recommendation con- 
cerning Screen Gems. He is told that 
the selection is satisfactory to the 
client. 

Haber calls Ben Berenberg, execu- 
tive producer at Screen Gems, tells 
him the job is his and arranges a meet- 
ing for the next day. 

1 July Haber and Berenberg look 
over the scripts and story-boards. 

After some two hours of this. Beren- 
berg and Haber are satisfied that they 
see eye to eye on all questions in- 
volved and Berenberg retains the 
scripts and story-boards for break- 
down. 

2 July The budget department of 
Screen Gems has broken down and 
itemized everything involved in the 
production of the six commercials and 
returns the budgets together with 
scripts and story-boards to Berenberg. 
who after a final check sends them to 
the agency for okay. 

6 July I After a long holiday week- 
end I Screen Gems and BBDO sign a 
contract, under the terms of which 
Screen Gems as the producing com- 
pany agrees to deliver six completed 
one-minute commercials, plus two 30- 
second versions for a specified sum. 
(Lucky Strike commercials have cost 
as little as $3,000 and as much as 
$20,000 each.) 

(Please turn to page 89) 



A GLOSSARY 



ASST. DIRECTOR 

A combination of assistant to the director and 
representative of the production manager on the set. 

BARNDOOR 

Metal shades, which can be attached to spot lights. 
A sma.l camera-boom on wheels. 

BUMP 

Covering for the camera to eliminate noises of 
the camera motor. 

CAMERA CREW 

A "full crew" consists of Director of Photography, 
Camera Operator, Assistant and 2nd Assistant 
Cameraman. For commercials the Director of Photog- 
raphy and the 2nd Assistant can be eliminated. 

CANNED MUSIC 

Music which was recorded at some previous time 
(for tv usually in foreign countries, to avoid the 
Petrillo percentage payments) and which is used as 
background music in tv films and commercials. 

CLAP-BOARD 

A slate with a clap-stick, used in scenes requiring 
synchronized sound (see slate I . 

DISSOLVE 

Gradual change from scene to scene via a momentary 
double-exposure. Usually indicates a time-lapse. 

DOLLY 

A small camera boom on wheels. 

DOUBLE SYSTEM 

Picture and sound are recorded simultaneously on two 
separate films, (or film and tape), which run 
through electrically interlocked machines in perfect 
synchronization of lip movement and voice. 

DUBBING 

In standard production, dubbing refers to the 
operation of combining dialogue, narration, music 
effects tracks and loops into one final sound-track. 
(Dubbing is also the name for making foreign 
language versions of American films, or vice versa.) 

DUPE NEGATIVE 

A duplicate of the original negative. 

EDITORIAL CREW 

The Film Editor I who does not like to be referred 
to as the cutter) who may work alone or with an 
assistant. In cases of extensive productions there are 
also Music Editors, Sound Effects I Sound FX ) Editors; 
The negative is cut by a Negative Cutter. 

ELECTRICAL CREW 

A Gaffer, who supervises the lighting is all that is 
needed for commercials. When larger sets require 
more men, there is the Best Boy who in turn 
is in charge of the Lamp Operators. 



FADE 



Gradual change from black to scene (fade-in 
or from scene to black (fade-out). 



OF TERMS USED IN FILM PRODUCTION 



VNE GRAIN 

A soft contrast print made from the original negative 
and from which a dupe negative can be made. (All 
opticals, dissolves, fades, wipes, etc. necessitate 
a fine-grain and dupe negative.) 

\'RST ANSWER PRINT 

First finished print made by the lab from the cut 
negtaive and final sound-track, ready for screening. 

ULL-CELL ANIMATION 

Drawings on celluloid, photographed to appear 
animated las done by Disney, for example). 



0B0 



A black shade used to keep light off certain areas 
of the set (old time motion picture men like to 
refer to agency men, who get into the 
way of the lights, as "gobos"). 



OOP 



A piece of film with a sound effect (such as applause) 
is spliced end to end, thus making a physical film- 
loop. It is then run continuously and dubbed 
into the final sound-track where needed. 

IATTE 

A section of the picture is "matted" out and a 
different image is substituted. 

WNTAGE 

Any sequence of short scenes, joined together by 
means of straight cuts, dissolves, wipes, super- 
imposures, etc., to indicate an idea or a situation or a 
long story condensed into a very short space of time. 

'. 0. s. 

Means the scene is shot silent. Comes from an 
old time German sound man at MGM who referred 
to such scenes as Mitout 5ound. 

IOVIOLA 

Editing machine in which the Editor can look at the 
picture and listen to the sound simultaneously. 

)PTICALS 

Optical effects, such as Fades, Dissolves, Wipes, etc. 

PRODUCTION MANAGER 

Makes the budget, supervises physical production 
to stay within the budget, authorizes, and checks 
expeditures, payrolls, etc. 

'LAY -BACK 

Pre-recorded track, usually music, to which the 
performers listen while doing an actual scene. (All 
musical numbers must be executed to a play-back, in 
order to assure perfect level and sound quality.) 

'RE-RECORDING 

Recording ahead of the shooting, usually to be 
used as a play-back (see definition above). 



RIGGING 

Placing the lights on a set, preparator) to actual 
production. Connecting all cables, etc. 

RUSHES (OR DAILIES) 

Prints of the scenes which are rushed through 

by the laboratorj after each day's shooting, to be 

screened for the director the following day. 

SILK 

A diffusion screen. 

SINGLE SYSTEM 

Picture and sound are photographed simultaneous!) 
by one camera (Auricon) on the same strip of Elm. 

SLATE 

Small blackboard photographed before each scene 
to identify the film I see clap-board i . 

SOUND CREW 

A Mixer, Recorder, Boom-man, Cable-man. For 
commercials only a Mixer and a Recorder are a must 
A Boom-man must be hired when sound-boom is used. 

SPLICER 

Used to splice two pieces of film together. 

STOP-MOTION 

To make inanimate objects appear to be moving on 
film I Lucky's marching cigarette series I . 

STRIKING 

Removing lights and sets after production is completed. 

SYNC-MACHINE 

Also called synchronizer, which holds from two to 
four or more strips of film (picture and/or sound) 
in synchronization. 

SYNC SOUND OR LIP-SYNC 

Scenes in which the actors actually talk. 

SYNK (OR SYNC) 

Synchronization. 

TRAVELLING MATTE 

Same as matte, only the section in question is 
moving, rather than stationary. 

VOICE-OVER 

In contrast to scenes in which actors talk, silenl scenes 
with narration which is recorded separately. 

WIPE 

Same as dissolve, only scene changes in the form of 
a specific design: right to lift, diagonal, circular 
from inside out or outside in and so on. I There 
are over 50 different standard wipe-design >. I 

WORK PRINT 

The print, with which the Film Editor works. 
consisting of the Rushes, which are being cut into 
their final shape in the process of editing. 

WORK SOUND 

Sound track equivalent of work print. 




She changed her mind 

Mrs. Qiiimi felt she had got the bird. Not so 
said Texas station manager. Deft letter handling 
brought happiness and a back hall "Yoo Hoo" 

Success always has a string around it. In fact, it may involve a cuckoo. Alex 
Keese, general manager of WFAA, Dallas, is a man who can speak with 
authority on the latter point. Recently, the Star Import Company bought 55 
quarter hours on WFAA to sell cuckoo clocks. Even in Texas, the results 
were slightly short of phenomenal with nearly $22,000 worth of clocks sold. 
One clock went to Mrs. James H. Quinn, Old Wire Road, Route 1, Fayetteville, 
Ark. To say that Mrs. Quinn had a problem would be an understatement even 
where cuckoo clocks are concerned. Her problem prompted correspondence 
with Mr. Keese, a problem solved quite nicely, thank you. Herewith is the 
correspondence concerning the clock, which, by the way, did not go "cuckoo" 
but uttered a "low rather musical tone as it merrily ticked away time." 



1. MRS. QUINN TELLS KEESE 2. KEESE ANSWERS MRS. Q. 3. EVERYBODY'S HAPPY NOW 




December 8, 1955 
Gentlemen : 

A short time ago our family heard a 
eulogy about a beautiful tho' practical 
cuckoo clock from the Black Woods in 
Germany, advertised over your station. 
The clock has arrived and to say that 
we are indignant would be putting it 
very mildly. 

Even discounting certain features 
and virtues this particular clock was 
advertised to possess, on the basis of 
sales oratory, we were not prepared for 
the cheap, unattractive, poorly finished 
piece of crude wood working ( ? ) 
which met our eyes. 

This is not only in the nature of a 
strong protest over having been 
"taken" but an inquiry into what the 
policy of a large and well known sta- 
tion, such as yours, might be in these 
circumstances. 

The Star Import Company cannot be 
anything other than a questionable or- 
ganization if they can use the spirit of 
Christmas as a reasonable excuse for 
unloading inferior merchandise upon a 
trusting public. 

Perhaps you could induce your ad- 
vertiser, in this instance, to return the 
money and we will be delighted to re- 
turn the clock. 

Very truly yours, 
(sg/d) Mrs. James H. Quinn 



December 14, 1955 
Dear Mrs. Quinn: 

We're so sorry that the clock, which 
you ordered as a result of advertising 
over WFAA, did not measure up to 
expectations. If you will return it to 
the station your money will be refund- 
ed promptly by the Star Import Com- 
pany because the clock was sold on a 
money-back guarantee. 

The Star Import Company is a repu- 
table firm, with substantial financial 
resources. Before accepting the adver- 
tising we checked into the merchandise 
and were advised by competent clock 
makers that it was a good value at 
$5.00. I have one in my breakfast 
room, exactly like the one which was 
sent to you, and my wife is delighted 
with it. It ticks away merrily and on 
the quarter hour the little cuckoo emits 
a low, rather musical tone. It doesn't 
say "cuckoo" like the old clocks we 
used to know — but I recently priced 
one of these at $60.00. 

Please return your clock promptly 
and your money will be mailed from 
Chicago the next day after we receive 
the clock. 

Keep listening to WFAA ! 

Cordially, 
Alex Keese 

Station managers take notice. Letter 
to Mrs. Quinn paid off handsomely. 
See the result in column at .right 



December 16, 1955 
Dear Mr. Keese: 

Thank you for the prompt and cor- 
dial reply to my complaint. After read- 
ing your letter I took another look, 
wondering how your wife could be 
delighted with the clock. It still looked 
stark, and somehow unfinished. Oh, 
well, perhaps I do need glasses! 

When my geology professor husband 
arrived home, I showed him letter and 
clock. He began to put the "thing" 
together, hung it on a hook in the hall, 
took the weight out of its wrapping 
and added that to the little brass chain. 
(I still didn't like it.) But then he 
scrounged around in the box and 
pulled out another piece which I had 
missed entirely. You know the punch 
line! This missing link was the decor- 
ative trim without which the clock was 
a dark wooden box with — horrors! — 
two nail ends (very sharp) and a wire 
staple adorning its brow. First time 
my eyes had beheld said nails and cute 
white paint dabs at the top, I thought 
"what those workmen get away with 
nowadays!" 

Our son says he doesn't "dig" that 
bluejay "sending" wolf calls. I shall 
continue to be startled every 15 min- 
utes by a "yoo hoo" from the back 
hall . . . but — my husband likes the 
clock. We keep it! 

Most apologetically, 
(sg/d) Doris K. Quinn 



40 



SPONSOR 




MOVES MERCHANDISE 

Capsule case histories proving 
TVs sales provoking abilities 

Each case history tells a tv result 
story, one that may apply to your 
market in 1956. The success histories 
are categorized and contain pinpointed 
facts on objectives, costs, the 
results obtained and methods used. 



HI 



automotive 



SPONSOR: Hermann & Wilton 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When station KZTV was 

built one studio was especially designed as an auto dis- 
play room. Hermann & Wihon, local auto dealers, 
helped sell the station on the idea. They have sponsored 
a five-minute show on Saturday evenings ever since the 
station first went on the air. After the first eight weeks 
they reported the following: of 16 cars shown during the 
two-month period, 11 had been sold by the following 
Sunday mornings. In fact, one successful lead came in 
while the show was still on the air. 



KZTV, Reno 



SHOW: Medallion Theatre 



automotive 



SPONSOR: Capitol Pontiac Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Pontiac dealer fot 
Springfield, Capitol Pontiac, recently assumed sponsor- 
ship of a Saturday night feature film program. The Sun- 
day morning following the first announcement (live com- 
mercials are used) over 300 people were in the car lot, 
although it did not open until Monday morning. The 
general sales manager reports the placement of 10 orders 
for new and used cars, a total sales volume of $20,000 
and 19 prospects. The cost of llie show (no other adver- 
tising was used) was $450. 

WICS, Springfield, 111. PROGRAM: Capitol Pontiac Pow Wow 



automotive 



SPONSOR: Weltner Pontiac 



AGENCY: R. Meltzer Adv. 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Since car sales usually 
slump in the fall Weltner Pontiac decided this was the 
lime to try television. Company bought nine football 
games on station KSAN-TV (uhf) . Games were sched- 
uled from 25 September to 20 November. Four games 
had been played by 18 October when Weltner reported 
it had sold its entire stock of 60 1954 Pontiacs and had 
orders for all of their first quota shipment of 1955 cars. 
Cost per game was $2,000. Average cost per car: 
$3,000. Cost of games: $8,000. Total sales: $180,000. 



KSAN-TV, San Francisco 



PROGRAM: Stanford, California 
football games 



automotive 



SPONSOR: Hardcastle Motor Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Hardcastle Motor Co. 
bought the 12:15 p.m. news program one day a week for 
a trial period of four weeks. Owner-Manager Dock Hard- 
castle, in extending the contract indefinitely, said: "After 
just our first and second broadcasts we received calls, 
letters and showroom visits from people all over middle 
Tennessee and southern Kentucky. After the second 
broadcast our sales people were answering telephone calls 
for more than 30 minutes." Each program costs $85. 



WSM-TV, Nashville 



PROGRAM: Midday News 



9 JANUARY 1956 



41 



TV RESULTS 



automotive 



SPONSOR: Roy Stauffer Chevrolet AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Three nights a week Roy 
Stauffer Chevrolet sponsors Life With Elizabeth on 
WARM-TV. On every program the sponsor shows a 
different car. At the end of the first three weeks of spon- 
sorship, the sponsor reported that he had sold nine out 
of nine cars shown. In each case the buyer had asked 
to see — and bought — the car advertised on television. 
Program cost is $128 per half -hour shoiv. 

WARM-TV, Scranton PROGRAM: Life With Elizabeth 



automotive 



garages 



SPONSOR: Abrahamson Lumber Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Since KKTV went on the 
air in December 1952 this firm has sponsored three 
weather shows. Last fall Abrahamson s promoted garages 
and carports with FHA Title 1 financing. Response was 
so great that for the next two weeks the company bought 
every available weather show on the station. When the 
campaign ended Abrahamson" s had sold $26,500 in ga- 
rages and carports — and it's still getting inquiries. The 
campaign cost $400. Live commercials with a cartoon 
panoramic strip were used for the weather shows. 

KKTV, Colorado Springs PROGRAM: KKTV Weather 



automotive 



garage coors 



SPONSOR: Wizard Manufacturing Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : As a result of a single an- 
nouncement at 12:45 a.m. on Jackson's Theatre, the 
Wizard Manufacturing Co. sold 12 radio-controlled ga- 
rage doors. The remote-operated doors can be opened 
and closed while the driver remains in his car. The 
announcement cost $150 and brought in $3,600 in orders. 
This meant $24 in sales for every dollar spent for adver- 
tising, a higher ratio than the company had gained when 
it had sponsored a 90-minute movie on another station. 



KTTV. Los Vngeles 



PROGRAM: Jackson's Theatre, 
announcements 



automotive n< 



SPONSOR: Universal Sales & Service 



AGENCY: Direct 



< A PSULE CASE HISTORY: One Sunday, tlis Meteor- 
Mercury -Lincoln dealer in Calgary, Alberta, ran three 
shared I.D.'s on CHCT-TV. The following Tuesday, the 
company reported to the station the sale of a new Lin- 
coln which they attributed directly to the three I.D.'s. 
The announcements appeared in the afternoon and eve- 
ning. Total cost: $69 plus art work. Universal was so 
pleased with this tv success that they have signed to 
sponsor a Sunday evening program, Madison Square 
Garden, for an entire year. 

CHCT-TV, Calgary, Alberta PROGRAM: Shared I.D.'s 



automotive o, 



SPONSOR: Wynn Oil Distributors AGENCY: BBDO, L.A. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: For several years the Wynn 
Oil Distributors looked for a way to develop an effective 
advertising campaign in central California. After spon- 
soring Tabloid News on Tuesday, Wednesday and Fri- 
day from 6:55 to 7:00 p.m. for several weeks and then 
at 6:25-6:30 for a total of 13 weeks, sales increased 70%. 
The commercials were done live by the local Wynn sales 
manager. The 13-week schedule cost $2,730. 
KJEO-TV, Fresno, Cal. PROGRAM: Tabloid News 



automotive 



paint jobs 



SPONSOR: B&H Automotive AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The first of 52 one-minute 
Class A announcements costing $54 each produced seven 
automobile paint jobs for the sponsor — a firm specializ- 
ing in this service for car owners. The announcement 
was telecast Sunday just before a local sports show. It 
used a locally produced film showing operations involved 
in painting a car while a booth announcer described the 
action. A slide with the firm's name, address and phone 
number was shown at the end of the film, and no special 
prices or inducements were offered. 

WREX-TV, Rockford, El. 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



automotive 



rubber 



SPONSOR: OK Rubber Welders Store AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Television forced this store 
out of business for 60 days — in order to remodel and 
expand! The sponsor wanted to reach farm and indus- 
trial workers and bought one one-minute participation 
announcement weekly on Saturday Jamboree, rotating 
between 7:00 and 10:00 p.m. At the end of the first 
month OK's business was up from $900 a month to 
$3,300 a month and has remained at this level ever since. 
Cost of the participations is $25. 

WROM-TY. Rome, Ga. PROGRAM: Participations 

aUtOmOtiVe seat covers 

SPONSOR: Rayco Seat Cover Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When the sponsor tested 
Los Angeles air media, it spent money on three tv stations 
and one radio station. KTTV produced 51 sales for a 
weekly ad outlay of $500 — better than four times the 
sales produced by the next highest ranking station, and 
at only half the cost. Most of the announcements on 
KTTV were placed in Jackson's Theatre, which had lower 
ratings than the announcements offered by the other sta- 
tions. Rayco dropped the rest of its tv advertising in 
the city and gave KTTV a 26-iveek contract. 



KTTV. Lo> Angeles 



PROGRAM: Jackson's Theatre, 
announcements 



42 



SPONSOR 



TV RESULTS 



automotive h. 



SPONSOR: Fisk Tire Distributor 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: l n an effort to boost sales 
in what ivas considered a slow market, the local Fisk Tire 
distributor decided to test a local tv program. The pro- 
gram selected was Tv Tune Shop, seen nightly over 
WMFD. Ttvo one-minute participations were bought. 
They were run on consecutive nights and consisted of 
live demonstrations showing the advantages oj Fisk Tires 
over other makes. Twenty-jour sales oj complete sets oj 
tires resulted — a healthy increase for only $70 invested. 



WMFD. Wilmington, N. C. 



PROGRAM: Tv Time Shop 



automotive u 



sed cars 



SPONSOR: Cox Motor Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: As an initial experiment 
with television, the Cox Motor Co., Tulsa, bought the 
second quarter of a national league pro football game, 
a regular Sunday afternoon feature on KCEB. During 
the program Cox Motors offered a used-car special on a 
1953 Plymouth Sedan. Within a few minutes after the 
game the car was sold. Sponsor received numerous calls 
for many days after the program. Cox feels it made 
many potential customers from these late callers. Total 
cost for sponsorship was $155. 

KCEB. Tulsa PROGRAM: National League pro football 



automotive u 



sed cars 



SPONSOR: DeSoto-Plymouth Dealer AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A DeSoto-Plymouth Dealer 
in Albany, N. Y., sold seven out of the 10 cars he showed 
on a "live" commercial over WTR1. The cars ranged in 
price from $169 to $2,200 and were shown in daily par- 
ticipations on the Forrest Willis Show, 3-4:30 p.m. every 
day. Willis hosts a movie with cutouts for commercials. 
The cost for 5 spots a week is $95. The success of this 
dealer has aroused the interest of other car dealers in the 
area, one of whom had insisted that there is no substitute 
for the real thing. 

WTRI, Albany PROGRAM: Forrest Willis Show, participations 



clothing 



fur coats 



SPONSOR: Littman Fur Factories 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: /„ the midst of declining 
fur sales last spring, Arthur Littman, president of Litt- 
man fur factories, reported that his firm has been making 
gains. He believes that his semi-weekly 15-minute tele- 
vision program, Fur Goodness Sakes, is responsible. On 
the program Littman explains the construction of furs 
and constantly repeats that fur is more economical than 
cloth in the long run. The firm had its best November, 
December and January sales in its history last year. 
Many sales are traced to the program. Cost, $156 plus 
talent. 

WXIX-TV, Milwaukee, Wise. PROGRAM: Fur Goodness Sakes 



clothing 



SPONSOR: Chet & Don's Style-Marl AGENCY: Direcl 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Chet & Don's Style-Mart, 
a men's clothing store, dropped its newspaper advertising 
to give tv a six-week trial. It scheduled three live an- 
nouncements per week over WMBV-TV. After one Fri- 
day I.D., over 90 people in the store mentioned seeing it, 
the following day. The store credited many suit sales to 
its announcements. Chet & Don's plans another similar 
trial of television in the fall. Cost of the six-week an- 
nouncement campaign: $600. 



WMBV-TV, Green Bay, Wis. 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



clothing shirts 



SPONSOR: Bond's Clothes AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A new Bond's store in Min- 
neapolis wanted to test the power of News with Sevareid 
over WTCN-TV. A dacron shirt which usually sells for 
$4.99 was offered at $2.75 or two for $5.00, but only if 
the customer told the clerk that he'd heard of the sale 
through Sevareid. Two announcements were made on 
the Friday evening program (10:30-10:45 p.m.) and 
four on Saturday morning. Two hours after the store 
opened Saturday morning all sizes were sold out. No 
other advertising was used. Campaign cost: $320. 
WTCN-TV, Minneapolis PROGRAM: News With Sevareid 



clothing 



trousers 



SPONSOR : Bargain Barn A GENC Y : Bridges, Sharp & Associates 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: R USS Helton, leader of The 
Trailhands (Western quartet), wears the pants in his 
outfit. In fact, on the 11 July program (show is aired 
Sundays at 11 a.m.) he wore some of the sponsor's pants 
and mentioned that they could be bought for $2 each. 
Only one of the program's four commercials was about 
the trousers, but 142 pairs of them were sold as a direct 
result. And the sponsor (which promises customers bar- 
gains from rattlers to tombstones I is beyond Dayton 
city limits. Cost of the hour show is $343.06 weekly. 
WLW-D, Dayton PROGRAM: Russ Helton's Trailhands 



dept. store 



SPONSOR: The Council Oak Stores 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: After a recent promotion 
advertised over KVTV (at a cost of $270), the sponsor 
wrote to the station that "Our sales on promotional items 
which have been so well presented on your station fiave 
been exceptional. As an example we moved 9,600 of the 
tv tables, a complete sell-out in less than four weeks. We 
feel that the success of such promotions is in no small 
measure due to our use of 'spots' over KVTV. We will 
want to continue the use of 'spots' in addition to our 
regular advertising over your station." 



KVTV, Sioux City 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



9 JANUARY 1956 



43 



TV RESULTS 



dept. store 



SPONSOR: Dillard's Dept. Store. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: For this year's annual Jan- 
uary sale, Dillard's Department Store used television as 
well as other advertising media. Howard Garland, a 
KCMC-TV announcer, made several announcements on 
31 January to promote the sale. This year Dillard's did 
over $5,000 more business than last year, when television 
was not included in the budget. The sales manager is 
confident tv ivill continue as a primary advertising 
medium. The one-day campaign cost $265. 

KCMC-TV, Texarkana, Texas PROGRAM: Announcements 



dept. store 



SPONSOR: Weinstock-Lubin & Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When this department store 
began its sponsorship of The Players Showcase {alter- 
nating every other week with a new car dealer) it 
offered viewers a holiday tv special by mail, phone or 
across the counter. A total of 41 phone orders resulted, 
and before the counter traffic became too heavy in the 
store, salesgirls found 59 customers who specifically 
mentioned the tv show in making their purchase. The 
mail order department as well was swamped by orders 
for the holiday tv special. Cost per week: $171. 



KBET-TV, Sacramento 



PROGRAM: The Players Theatre 



dept. store 



SPONSOR: Hartley's Department Store AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Hartley's, a large Miami 
department store, received a jolt from its first contact 
with the power of television advertising. WGBS-TV 
wanted to demonstrate the drawing power of its pro- 
grams, so it had the m.c.'s of two children's shows 
appear at the kids' department in the store. With only 
two announcements on each show, two days in advance 
of their appearance, the stars drew crowds of children all 
morning. Cost of announcements: $147.50. 



WGBS-TV, Miami 



PROGRAMS: The Little Rascals, 
Romper Room, announcements 



dept. store 



SPONSOR: Hudson Brothers 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: With sales mounting up 
each month television appears to be the cheapest adver- 
tising Hudson Brothers has ever used. Hudson's spends 
$1,200 a month for a 6 p.m. newscast five days a week 
over KTEN. Sales attributed to tv are now averaging 
$15,000 a month. The second air week a woman from 
70 miles away bought a hundred dollars worth of mer- 
chandise. With this and similar sales Hudson's feels 
tv is doing a job for them. 



KTEN, Ada, Okla. 



PROGRAM: 6 P.M. News 



dept. store 



charge accounts 



SPONSOR: Sears, Roebuck & Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Sears was skeptical about 
television advertising when they bought a half-hour of 
the Saturday night Sunset Valley Barn Dance for six 
weeks. The commercials were devoted to encouraging 
people to open charge accounts. The first week over 100 
new accounts were opened; the number increases each 
week. Sears' skepticism has diminished — lliev have signed 
for another 12 weeks. The cost of each show, including 
live talent of over 10 people, is $435. 



KSTP-TV, St. Paul 



PROGRAM: Sunset Valley Barn Dance 



dept. store «. 



le 



SPONSOR: Strouss-Hirshberg 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: After using WKBN-TV for 
tv announcements promoting a semi-annual Remnant 
Day sale, this department store — one of Youngstowns 
leaders — reported total sales had reached an all-lime high 
for any comparable period. Schedule called for 20 an- 
nouncements at a total cost of $800. Store officials said, 
"There's no question about the impact of WKBN-TV. . . . 
During this last sale crowds were so tremendous it was 
difficult to get in and out of the store. . . ." The store 
increased its tv budget, reduced its newspaper schedule. 



WKBN-TV, Youngstown, Ohio 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



dept. store socks 



SPONSOR: Leader Dept. Store 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A teen-age dance program, 
Johnny Sobol's Rumpus Room, was used by this depart- 
ment store to push their sales of bobby socks. The socks 
sold at three pairs for a dollar. After running one an- 
nouncement a day for three weeks, The Leader Depart- 
ment Store grossed $1,667 in bobby socks sales and in- 
creased traffic in other departments as well. The cost 
of this announcement campaign (the program is a 
weekday one) was $240. 



WILK-TV, Wilkes Barre, Pa. 



PROGRAM: Rumpus Room, 
announcements 



dept. store suits 



SPONSOR: Sears, Roebuck & Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Reno Sears store used 
one 10-minute commercial showing a man being mea- 
sured for a tailor-made suit in the store. As a direct re- 
sult of the commercial, 19 suits were sold. They averaged 
$75 in price; the cost of the commercial ivas $82.50. The 
store reports, too, that a number of ready-to-wear suits 
also were sold to viewers. The advertising-to-sales ratio 
for the tailor-made suits was about 18 to 1. No other 
advertising was used. 

KZTV, Reno PROGRAM: Announcement 



44 



SPONSOR 









. 



. ■■■•'■ 









Black 
Means 
Leadership 
in Memphis 

• • • ana 



Black 



=13 




White 



— STATION 

— "B" 



™ TIE 



In Memphis — and the Mid-South 
The Most Powerful Station 
Is the Most Popular. 



*WHBQ-TV not on ai 




WHBQ-TV 

Memphis, Tenn. 



Represented Nationally by Blair TV, Inc. 

American Research Bureau Report, November, 1955. 




9 JANUARY 1956 



45 






MORE VIEWERS MORE COVERA6 



OKI-***** Here are FACTS from the 

^^^^^^^™ November ARB for the metropolitan 
WliWiSt Oklahoma City area 

DAYTIME 

8 AM to 5 PM, Monday thru Friday 

KWTV - 12h quarter hour segments 

Station B - 1+9 quarter hour segments 

Tie - 7 quarter hour segments 

TOTAL 180 

■NIGHTTIME 
&M Out of the top 30 weekly shows , 

KWTV leads in 18, including 
these top four: 

$6U,000 Question 57.9 

I Love Lucy 52.1 

Red Skelton k6.6 

What's My Line 1*1.0 

. . . AND IN ADDITION, KWTV has the - 

- highest rated local daytime show - 

W VIVIAN, HARRY AND EDDIE 9.8 

- highest rated daytime network 
women's show - ART LINKLETTER. .12.5 

highest rated daytime participation 
show - MY LITTLE MARGIE 17.9 , 

highest rated children 1 s network 
show - MICKEY MOUSE CLUB 29. 1 

highest rated children' s partici- 
pating show - RANGE RIDER 16.3 









FREDERICK 






Vorld's Tallest Man-Made Structure 

EDGAR T. BELL, Executive Vice President 
\ FRED L. VANCE, Sales Manager 

Represented by AVERY-KNODEL, INC. 



TV RESULTS 



fOOd cakes 



SPONSOR: Jos. Vaillancourt 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Though the French-language 
program Tele-Casse-Tete revolves around a puzzle, there 
was no puzzle about the sponsor s results. A total of 
3,500 cakes was sold at 69c each for a total time expen- 
diture of $99. On Tele-Casse-Tete, the m.c. shows a 
picture of a well-known personality in the form of a 
jig-saw puzzle. Viewers identify the personality and send 
in proof of purchase of the tv special to win a prize. 
After five 15-minute shows, proof of $2,415 in sales was 
submitted by contestants. 



CFCM-TV, Quebec 



food 



PROGRAM: Tele-Casse-Tete 



cakes 



SPONSOR : Omar Bakeries 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: For Mothers Day the Omar 
Bakeries advertised a special cake on their Omar Weather 
Program, Monday through Friday at 5:10 p.m. No other 
advertising was used. They received 80 telephone orders, 
which meant 80 new route prospects. The cakes actually 
sold out in advance in the grocery stores and for the first 
time in this area grocers had to reorder from Omar. 
The organization was convinced that tv could best reach 
both consumer and retailer. 

WHO-TV, Des Moines, la. PROGRAM: Omar Weather Program 



food 



candy 



SPONSOR: M&M Candies AGENCY: Roy S. Durstine, Inc. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Last November M&M Can- 
dies bought Johnny Jupiter, a half-hour Saturday morn- 
ing children's film program, for national spot sponsor- 
ship. Seven months later M&M business is up 250% in 
the Nashville area, with jobber orders up as much as 
600% in some cases. The film program is telecast between 
9:00 and 9:30 a.m The stations Class C 26-time rate 
(not including talent, film and so forth) is $114. 

WSM-TV, Nashville PROGRAM: Johnny Jupiter 



food 



cereal 



SPONSOR: Carnation Co. 



AGENCY: Erwin, Wasey 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: During the slow summer 
months the Carnation Co. purchased three participations 
a week on Bar 27 Corral to sell Alber's Oats and Carna- 
tion Corn Flakes. After only a short time corn flake sales 
increased 365% and oat sales rose 35%. KPTV reports: 
"The advertiser and the local salesman are so enthusias- 
tic over the results of their television advertising that 
they have become great boosters of television." Carna- 
tion also schedules personal appearances for Heck 
Harper, star of the show. Cost per participation is $65. 



KPTV, Portland, Ore. 



PROGRAM: Bar 27 Corral 



food 



dairy products 



SPONSOR: Green Meadow Dairies AGENCY: Batz, Hodgson, 

Neuwhoner 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Aiming at a young audi- 
ence Green Meadow Dairies bought a late-afternoon 
Western film on W ROM-TV . The show, Wranglers' Club, 
consists of one Western movie a week shown in 15 min- 
ute segments across-the-board. Green Meadows sponsors 
two segments a week. By the third week on television 
the sponsor reported 230 new route customers. Because 
of customer response, Green Meadows intends to keep 
sponsoring show as main sales vehicle. Cost per segment 
is $45. 
WROM-TV, Rome, Ga. PROGRAM: Wranglers' Club 



TOOCB dairy products 



SPONSOR: Holland Dairies 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The Monday evening Hol- 
land Talent Spot (7:30 to 8:00 p.m.) features amateur 
contestants who vie for a trip to New York and an audi- 
tion on a network talent show. Viewers vote for their 
favorite contestant by sending in bottle caps or trade 
marks from the sponsor s packages. One week's voting 
brought in 75,000 votes, each with a label or seal as a 
proof of purchase of the client's advertised products. 
Weekly cost of Holland Talent Spot is $135. 

WFIE-TV, Evansville, Ind. PROGRAM: Holland Talent Spot 



food 



hams 



SPONSOR: Cardinal Markets AGENCY: Martin Rhode, Sac. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY-. Cardinal Markets sponsors 
the Cardinal Theatre on Thursday evenings from 7:30- 
8:00. The middle 30-second commercial was devoted to 
the Made-Rite Sausage Co.'s special hams for Easter. 
Thirty-one markets handled this special and reported that 
over 5,000 were sold, breaking all records in the area. 
This was the first use of television by the sausage com- 
pany; no other media were used. Cost: $158. 

KBET-TV, Sacramento, Cal. PROGRAM: Cardinal Theatre 



food 



hot dogs 



SPONSOR: Pegwill Packing Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Western feature films on tv 
are helping sell 18,000 pounds of hot dogs weekly for the 
Pegwill Packing Co., Springfield, 111. The firm sponsors 
Western Round-up across-the-board at 5:00 p.m. over 
WICS. During the first five weeks of the show sales 
jumped 38% and Pegwill's hot dogs are now selling at 
the rate of 18,000 pounds weekly. WICS personality 
"Pegwill Pete" holds a weekly party for area youngsters 
with children submitting drawings to qualify for attend 
ance. The first week Pete received 1,100 drawings. 



WICS, Springfield, 111. 



PROGRAM: Western Round-up 



48 



SPONSOR 




Both rating services agree — KENS-TV is First in 
San Antonio. The November 1955 reports for both ARB 
and Telepulse show that KENS-TV is San Antonio's 
favorite television station morning, afternoon and 
evening, Monday through Friday (Saturday and 
Sunday evenings, too!) Not the least of KENS-TV's 
strength is found in its own station-produced 
participating programs ... a very happy combination 
with the CBS-TV network. Whether you buy by the 
slide rule, or sales results, or both, you'll find that 
KENS-TV really figures in San Antonio. Your F & P 
Colonel would like the opportunity of sitting down and 
figuring out a low cost, high rating schedule with you. 




CBS IN SAN ANTONIO 



KENS-TV 

EXPRESS-NEWS STATION 




SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS 



9 JANUARY 1956 



49 







SHARE OF AUDIENCE 

(Area Pulse) 

7 a.m. -12 noon 
12 noon-6 p.m. 
6 p.m.-l 1 p.m. 



TOTAL 
SIX TV 

STATIONS 



THE OLD ORDER CHANGETH . . . 
Giving way to the new . . . combining . . . 
with television ... a myriad of small mar- 
kets . . . into a rich new single market 
completely covered and served only by 
WSFA-TV. 



Your Message Will Be Seen More, 
Mean More, On • . . 




50 



SPONSOR 



TV RESULTS 



food 



meat 



SPONSOR: I.G.A. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY : Many stores sell sections of 
chickens in an unspectacular way, but the l.G.A. made 
up a three-legged, triple-breasted chicken and showed 
it over its Thursday night Corliss Archer show. Al- 
though not designed as a permanent line, the item be- 
came so popular, some of the stores in the chain are still 
featuring the special. The chain also ran ttvo "Ton O' 
Pork" sales within a six- week period, boosted sales of 
pork 200 and 350% respectively. l.G.A.'s yearly cost 
for Corliss Archer: $8,000. 



WSAU-TV, Wausau. Wis. 



PROGRAM: Corliss Archer 



food 



meat 



SPONSOR: R&S Packing Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: "We know that uhf can do 
the job," writes Earl Welde, commercial manager for 
WNAO-TV . "Our station competes with two vhf signals 
in the area" he continues, "yet R&S Packing Co. jumped 
retail sales from 8,000 pounds of meat production daily 
to 26,000 pounds using WNAO-TV as its sole means of 
promotion. The sponsor buys the hour-long Country 
Style live program each Saturday night. There's no suc- 
cess story like this in the history of the Raleigh-Durham 
market. . . ." Time cost (52-time rate) is $180 an hour. 



WNAO-TV, Raleigh 



PROGRAM: Country Style 



food 



produce 



SPONSOR: Fadler Produce Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: To test whether television 
could do a selling job for a wholesale produce company, 
the Fadler Co. bought a Sunday evening film show. For 
13 weeks, on alternate Sundays, the half hour program 
was used to promote their packaged tomatoes, potatoes 
and oranges. "Using the corresponding weeks a year ago 
as a basis of comparison," writes Manager C. Curtis 
Watkins, "the records show that the sale of our 10 lb. 
packaged potatoes increased 468.9''/ . . . tomatoes 
63.8' ; . . . oranges, 129.1%." Each show cost $63. 



KYTV, Springfield, Mo. 



PROGRAM: Counterpoint 



food 



relishes 



SPONSOR: Mrs. Schlorer's AGENCY: Lavenson, Phila. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Using one announcement a 
week on Fun House featuring Pete Boyle, Mrs. Schlorer's 
promotes a contest. Viewers are invited to tear out a 
Pete Boyle cartoon from the newspaper, color it and mail 
it to the show. No purchase is required, but a bonus 
prize is awarded if a label is attached. More than 6.000 
entries were received after three announcements and over 
><)', of them had labels attached. The cost of each 
announcement ivas $260. 



WPTZ, Philadelphia 



PROGRAM: Fun II. 



food 



soda pop 



SPONSOR: Uncle Joe Bottling Co. AGENCY: Promotions, Inc. 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: For many years strawberry 
flavor was one of the poorest sellers for the Uncle Joe 
Bottling Company. In July company decided to push 
sales promotion for its Country Red strawberry drink in 
the Shreveport area. Company began sponsorship of a 
15-minute children s program, Al's Corral, on Thursday 
afternoons. Sales started increasing after the first show 
and continued to mount. Stores which had once refused 
to slock Old Country were now finding a demand for it. 
Nine-week campaign cost $787.50. 



KSLA, Shreveport, La. 



PROGRAM: \l's Corral 



food 



SPONSOR: Wine Corp. of America AGENCY: Weiss & Geller 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Mogen David wine was in- 
troduced in the Hawaiian market about 18 months ago. 
Initial sales progress was unexciting — an average of 200 
cases a month and fifth place in the market's brand 
standing. In October 1953 Mogen David's Dollar a 
Second network show went on KONA Sunday evenings 
(local Class "A" time, 13-week basis, $108 weekly). 
Within three months 1,000 cases monthly were being 
sold; in February, 1,200 cases. Today, according to 
Honolulu Consumer Analysis, Mogen David is first. 



KONA, Honolulu 



PROGRAM: Dollar a Second 



furniture 



SPONSOR: WG&R Furniture Co. AGENCY: Direc! 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Not only did tv draw local 
customers to the Pulaski, Wis., WG&R Furniture Co., 
but it drew viewers living 50 to 100 miles from the sta- 
tion. Participations in a polka band program, the Dick 
Rodgers Show, Tuesdays from 9:30 to 10:00 p.m. boosted 
sales for the store and increased store traffic noticeably. 
These increases in business were apparent to the manage- 
ment of the furniture store after only eight weeks of their 
52-week contract. WG&R's cost per week for partici- 
pations was $135. 



WMBV-TV, Green Bay, Wis 



PROGRAM: Dick Rodgers 



furniture 



SPONSOR: Gilbert's AGENCY: Goldman & Shoop 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The great sales problem of 
all Pittsburgh downtown stores is getting people to come 
into the vicinity to shop. A specialist in unusual furni- 
ture, Gilbert's has been using tv exclusively for this 
purpose. Joseph Gilbert, owner of the company, reports 
it has succeeded for him. Customers have come from all 
over the Tri-State Area to see the store shown over 
KDKA-TV. Children, especially, want to see their "Fairy- 
land, of Furniture" (a special feature of the store) . 



KDKA-TV. Pittsburgh 



PROGR V\I: Announcement 



9 JANUARY 1956 



51 



AMERICAN INTELLIGENCE AGENTS 
HELP SHAPE WORLD DESTINY 



Espionage Agents, America's First Line of Defense 

"SECRET AGENTS have molded our destiny," 
states the recent Funk & Wagnall publication, 
"War of Wits: Anatomy of Espionage and Intel- 
ligence." 

Survival of any nation today, in the event of 
attack by an enemy power, may be directly in 
proportion to its advance "intelligence" or 
knowledge, of that enemy . . . disposition of 
land, sea and air power, hidden targets, weak 
points, concentration of physical resources, de- 
fenses, stamina of its people, intentions, plans, 



Espionage 
Expert 
Reveals 
Secrets 

Opens Formerly 

"Classified" 

Files 




LADISLAS FARAGO 
The man who penetrated 
the intelligence services of 
the World's Great Powers! 



THE SECRET PAPERS and daring exploits of 
the master spies and renowned intelligence 
directors of our day are revealed in the newly 
opened files of Ladislas Farago, famous author 
and authority on international intelligence. 

This former Chief Analyst in the Office of 
Naval Intelligence, who served as special Con- 
sultant to our Joint Chiefs of Staff, has a thor- 
ough knowledge of the skills and methods of 
espionage and has gathered a vast accumulation 
of actual experiences in this field. Under the 
now-famous "Colonel Bell" pseudonym, he 
headed the secret "Desk X" in the post-war 
American espionage in Europe. 

In his wartime positions, Farago personally 
met, talked with and studied the work of the 
world's leading intelligence experts. 

Concerning Farago's qualifications as a mas- 
ter of intelligence, an O.N.I. Lieutenant Com- 
mander said of him: "I know of no one who 
remotely approaches him as an expert . . ." 

A few of the men who have "opened up" to 
him include these master spies of World Wars 
I and II: Captain Franz von Rintelen, Chief of 
German Sabotage in U.S.; Colonel George Sos- 
nowski, Polish Intelligence; Sir Paul Dukes, 
British Secret Service . . . and others. 

His many books are required reading in in- 
telligence services of all great powers . . . "War of 
Wits," "The Riddle of Arabia," etc. 

World Powers Spend Estimated $3 
Billion Annually For "Intelligence" 

THE HUGE EXPENDITURE by every nation 
for the international war of wits is concrete evi- 
dence that all are extremely aware of the need 
to know what is going on. 

Once a year, on Budget Day in the House of 
Commons, the British Foreign and other Secret 
Services appropriations come to light. The 1954 
figure of 3 million pounds, the highest in the 
history of British secret service, reveals only 
public funds alloted, whereas the bulk of 
Britain's intelligence budget comes from private 
sources. 

Likewise, the budget of the U. S. Central 
Intelligence Agency is not known. Published 
estimates, however, run from $500 million to 
SK00 million. The only allotment specifically 
designated for U. S. Army Intelligence is "Ac- 
tivity 2100" which includes "Activity 2131." 
secret intelligence. The $54,454,000.00 the U. S. 
Army requested for intelligence in the 1954-55 
budget is but a fraction of C.I.A.'s top secret 
budget. 

C.I. A. Director Allen Dulles estimates Rus- 
sia's intelligence budget at two billion dollars 
annually for subversion alone, not including the 
cost of gathering information. Advertisement 



and capacities of its gov- 
ernment. 

The only way to stop 
another "Pearl Harbor" is 
to know when one is in 
the making — not at the 
moment when bombs drop, but before the enemy 
task force moves from the home base. The role of 
intelligence operations in preserving peace is spot- 
lighted by former Deputy Head of Naval Intelli- 
gence, Admiral Ellis M. Zacharias. "A highly effec- 
tive intelligence organization is an inescapable neces- 
sity as a preventative of war," he asserts. "I telli- 
gence anticipates conflict . . . and . . . onlv intelligence 
makes possible a workable, fruitful diplomacy to 
prevent conflict." 



Intelligence Saves Lives 
One of hundreds of thrilling, dramatic exai 
"intelligence" in action that have altered the 
history, occurred in the winter of 1942-3. W 
battle of the Atlantic was least encouraging 
Allies, our agents reported new German exp( 
on an awesome acoustic torpedo to be guide 
sound of the target ship s prcpellers. Soon tl 
the survivors of a sunken U-boat were bri 
Washington. After patient interrogation, ; 
American obtained from a German petty ofl 
blueprints for the torpedo. Defenses were 
The torpedo that the Germans thought woul 
the battle of the Atlantic proved almost co: 
ineffective. 

Because of security reasons, the most da 
ploits of our brave agents remain "top secre 



' 



», 




K. VITAL TO U. S. POLICY MAKERS 



il3l Intelligence Agency Collects, Eval 
^rational Secrets for Our Government 

I I.A. operates all over the world. But how 
ivments does it have? Technical experts? Spy 
rijors? Card index machines? Or even janitors? 
jen Congress knows. 

h'New York World-Telegram & Sun, in an ex- 
ste article on the C.I. A. which appeared October 
9j, stated "Congress itself willed in 1947 that 
nld be kept in ignorance of practically every- 
g|bout C.I. A. . . . for the obvious reason that 
1 tcidental revelation of any details . . . would 



uates, "Classifies" 
Leaders 

be a 10-strike for foreign intelligence.'' 

Created by the National Security Act in 1947, 
directly responsible to the National Security Council 
and through it, to the President, the Central In- 
telligence Agency, headed by Allen W. Dulles, is 
America's top-ranking intelligence operation. 

It coordinates the activities ot all other United 
States intelligence services . . . collecting, analyzing, 
interpreting it . . . and passing it on to the proper offi- 
cials for action. C.l.A. is not a policy-making body. 




The C.l.A. stall ot 10,000 includes AmerU 
specially trained for hazardous espionage mis 
sions all over the world . . . nationals of friendly j 
powers ... or natives of nations under the 
C.I.A.'s scrutiny. Their identities are top-so 

Espionage Training Rigorous 
The C.l.A. conducts special and rigorous 
training in all the aits of espionage: How to 
contact another agent on a street corner, how to 
throw a tracker off the trail, how to smuggle 
out reports reduced by microphotography to 
si/e and guise of a period at the end of a sen- I 
tence, how to kill silently if killing should ever 
become necessar) to protect a vital mission, how 
to avoid being killed. 

The college graduate who takes on a C.l.A. 
assignment is told at the outset that he is putting 
his life on the line. The C.l.A. sends man. 
agents behind the Iron and Bamboo curtains. 
By no means all of them come back 

C.I.A.'s budget is not known . . but a pub- 
lished estimate' puts it up to $800,000,000 yeaik 
... a fraction of the estimated Russian expendi- 
ture of S:.000.000,000 yearly for intelligence 
operations. 

SPY STORIES 
ALWAYS GREAT 
ENTERTAINMENT 

TV Audiences Eager 
For Authentic, Documented TV Fare! 

THE AMERICAN PUBLIC is becoming more 
and more discriminating in its selection of TV 
entertainment. It has learned to shun the phonv 
fiction melodramas that are obviously the fig- 
ments of some overly imaginative scriptwriters. 

Today the average TV viewer's taste for dia- 
matie entertainment has developed far beyond 
the "I'll watch anything as long as it's television" 
stage of some vears ago. The most outstanding 
TV film series on the air today are based on 
authentic fact, technically supervised by experts 
... all featuring the adventures of great law- 
enforcement agencies in action. 

This new era in television viewing is due in 
great part to the vast contributions made by t he- 
TV film producers, outstanding among whom 
is ZIV Television Programs, Inc. ZIV's "I Led 
3 Lives," "Mr. District Attorney" and "Highwa) 
Patted" are splendid examples of the type of 
authentic adventure shows that people ate eager 
to watch. 

Viewers want to see how their local, state 
and federal law enforcement agencies operate. 
MR. D. A. takes them behind the see' e of local 
law enforcement agencies in action. HIGHWAY 
PATROL presents the experiences of state 
troopers in all 48 states. I LED 3 LIVES reveals 
experiences from the files of a counterspy for 
the F.B.I. Proof of the popularity o( this type 
of entertainment is evident hv the high audience 
ratings enjoyed weekly by these three top film 
programs in city after city. 

New TV Series Features 
International Law Enforcement 

Now, in ZIV's newest "law enforcement" 
series "The Man Called X," the action is on a 
global basis. "The Man Called X" deals in 
authentic espionage and counter espionage activ- 
ities in the world's capitals and the super-secret 
arenas of undercover diplomacy. 

True-to-life spy stories have always had an 
irresistible attraction wherever presented . . 
whether movies, books, radio, magazines or 
newspapers. For the first time advertisers can 
offer their customers TV entertainment drama- 
tizing true spy stones based on material from 
the files of one of America's foremost intelli- 
gence experts. 



Map-Making Data Vital 

At present there are over 8.000 persons in the 
U. S. Army permanently engaged in this special- 
ized intelligence activity. The Army's current 
annual expenditure for this vastly important 
phase of intelligence averages $40 million. Adv. 



TV RESULTS 



furniture 



SPONSOR: Laurence Mayflower Furniture AGENCY: Direct 

Warehouse 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: ] n January 1955, sponsor 

started two filmed announcements weekly in late movie 

show, increased to five per week within a month. Sales 

rose so much that in 60 days the firm bought a half-hour 

country music show, which in turn boosted its sales again. 

linally the company bought an additional 15-minute news 

program, now attributes 90% of its business directly to 

tv. The sponsor's dollar volume increased approximately 

30 r /f . Campaign cost to date: $2,250. 

KHSL-TV, Chico, Cal. PROGRAM: Ozark Jubilee; 

KHSL-TY World News 



furniture 



beds 



SPONSOR: Autry Bros., Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Roch Ulmer, the staff m.c. 
of Star Time, recently delivered two commercials for the 
12:15-12:30 a.m. segment of the program in a flannel 
nightshirt and sleeping cap as he relaxed on the spon- 
sor's Sleep-E-Z bed. But he didn't put the audience to 
sleep — not right away, anyhow. During the next three 
days $5,400 north of Sleep-E-Z beds were sold and the 
sponsor's field supervisors attributed 75% of the store 
traffic to Ulmer's relaxed selling. Cost of 15-minute 
Class C lime segment (26-time rate) is $190. 

WHB-TV, Kansas City PROCRAM: Star Time 



furniture 



bedroom sets 



SPONSOR: General Department Stores AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The company, operating 23 
stores in remote sections of West Virginia, had unsuc- 
cessfully tried newspaper and radio advertising. It ran 
four one-minute live participations daily on WSAZ-TV , 
which, covers 95% of the company's stores. After 10 
days, it had sold 147 bedroom suites totaling $32,766 in 
sales. The participations cost $296. Cost: only 0.9% 
of sales, a remarkably low figure, pointed out the spon- 
sor s merchandise manager and one which will be the 
basis for future ad campaigns. 



WSAZ-TV. Huntington, W. Va. 



PROGRAM: Coffee Tim 



gardening 



SPONSOR: Savemore Drug Stores AGENCY: Mark Schreiber 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The sponsor, a chain of 10 
drug stores, bought a one-minute participation on 
Wednesday nights. An offer of garden hose on 21 April 
at $2.49 for 50 feet and of soil soakers for 99c was tele- 
cast. "The fantastic sales story is this," Mark Schreiber 
said. "For an expenditure of $79.50, the stores had a 
dollar volume of more than $2,000 in retail sales on these 
items. Naturally, with this kind of story, we have requested 
additional commercials on Academy Theatre." 

KOA-TV, Denver PROGRAM: Academy Theatre 



gardening bu 



lbs 



SPONSOR: Condon Brothers Seedsmen 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A seed company found they 
were oversupplied with Dutch Tulip Bulbs at the end of 
the season. To move them they bought five participa- 
tions on Helen Bale's Tv Kitchen over WREX-TV in 
Rockford. III. The complete supply was sold out in five 
days and owner Leonard R. Condon reported responses 
from peojde 50-60 miles away. The cost of the campaign 
was $285. Televiion will be this company's first ad- 
vertising choice in the future. 



WREX-TV, Rockford, 111. 



PROGRAM: Tv Kitchen 



gardening P i a 



n»s 



SPONSOR: Stringer Bros. Nurseries AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: /„ the first experience this 
firm had with tv, it used a live one-minute announcement 
on WHBQ-TV, Friday night. It was amazed when it sold 
all 500 of the advertised gardenia plants in the first hour 
of business Saturday morning. In the following weeks 
the complete stock of 1,000 plants was sold every Satur- 
day following the Friday night commercial. Believing it 
had a 30-day supply, the nursery advertised its Black 
Magic Mulch, and was sold out on Saturday, causing a 
reorder. Cost of each GO-second announcements per 
week is $100. 
WHBQ-TV, Memphis PROGRAM: Announcements 



gardening 



seeds 



AGENCY: Direct 
Farmers do too watch tele- 



SPONSOR: Callan Field Seeds 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: 
vision! Ed Callan, who oivns the Callan Field Seeds 
firm, bought a one-minute participation announcement 
in a half-hour local show every week (one-time one- 
minute Class A rate is $40 1, wrote to KELO-TV thusly : 
"/ just wanted you to know how successful my television 
promotion has been. The new business I have received 
. . . already has paid for over half of the contract and 
it has only been on once. The ad was seen in [several 
towns] and resulted in many new accounts. 



KELO-TV, Sioux Falls, S. D. 



PROGRAM: Participation 



home appliances 



air coolers 



SPONSOR: Hollis Furniture Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: /„ mid-May, Doug Hollis 
opened his furniture store. Eight weeks later he began 
sponsorship of the Friday Owl Movie on KCEB 
(time cost is $92.50 an hour, 52-time rate). "On our 
opening night as sponsors," Hollis says, "we featured 
the Essex Air Cooling unit. Neither this item, nor our 
location had been publicized in any other advertising 
media. The day following our initial telecast we sold 
out our complete slock of Essex Air Coolers. Further, 
we took 17 additional orders for later delivery." 



KCEB. Tul-a 



PROGRAM: Owl Movie 



54 



SPONSOR 



l« 



To SELL your 
product best 
m Oklahoma . . . 




SHOW it o 

Oklahoma's Leladin q 
TV Statio 



• • • 



6famwe£ 



WKYTV 



NBC 
ABC 



OKLAHOMA CITY 



Owned and operated by THE OKLAHOMA PUBLISHING COMPANY: The Daily Oklahoman, Oklahoma City Times, The Farmer-Stockman, WKY, WSFA, WSFA-TV , 

Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY. 



TV RESULTS 



home appliances <> 



ir coolers 



SPONSOR: Air Temperature, Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Air Temperature, Inc., of 
Yuma now sells 'em by the carload lot. The product is 
Chrysler Airtemp residential air conditioners which cost 
from $1,400 to $1,600 apiece. And sale of a carload lot 
is directly attributed to three weekly half-hour film dra- 
mas bought in June for $150 each. There were 33 units 
sold in the area in June — of which this sponsor sold half. 
During July and August he continued to outsell all other 
dealers two to one. Cost of the campaign: $1,500. 

KIVA, Yuma PROGRAM: Favorite Story 



home appliances dippers 



SPONSOR: National Appliance & Television AGENCY: Direct 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Participations in a late 
night movie on WREX-TV brought this reaction from 
the client: "To put it mildly, we are more than pleased 
with our advertising." Seven participations were bought 
to plug the Falls Roto-Clipper but after the first two, the 
client's entire carload was sold out. A reorder was neces- 
sary to fill a waiting list, and then a third order was made 
to fill the demand brought about by the remaining an- 
nouncements. Cost of the participations is $70 weekly. 



WREX-TV, Rockford, 111. 



PROGRAM: Movie Time, 
participations 



hOme applianCeS freezer plan 

SPONSOR: Parliament Food Plan AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This company sells frozen 
food plans, delivering a freezer with food to customers 
on an installment payment basis. The firm ran an an- 
nouncement campaign on WXIX-TV at a cost of $1,600 
per week. The initial campaign resulted in 40 deliveries, 
far in excess of Parliament's expectations. The lead cost 
per delivery was reduced by $35. The sponsor renewed 
for 26 weeks. 

WXIX-TV, Milwaukee PROGRAM: Announcements 

home appliances liquidizer 



SPONSOR: S. H. DeRoy Jewelry, Inc. 



AGENCY: Jay Reich 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Using its weekly televi- 
sion show to put over a new product paid off for this 
sponsor. The Knapp-Monarch Liquidizer was shown on 
Diamond Theatre every week during a nine-month pe- 
riod. Despite the fact that the product ivas relatively 
new to the locale, 1,050 Liquidizers were sold at $39.95. 
Only commercials used were 90-seconds during the fea- 
ture films. Diamond Theatre costs the sponsor $382.50 
per week on a yearly basis. 



WXIX-TV, Milwaukee 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



household 



cap opener 



SPONSOR: Aunt Jane Pickles 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: On 26 January Ruth Lyons 
offered a cap opener for vacuum-sealed jars. The cap 
was offered for 10 cents — and from late January to early 
March more than 15,797 dimes rolled in for the opener. 
Top day's mail was 28 January, when more than 1,666 
requests came in for the device. A one-minute live par- 
ticipation in the 50-50 Club is $230; the program is tele- 
cast 90 minutes daily over WLWT, Cincinnati, WLWC, 
Columbus and WLWD, Dayton. 



WLWT, WLWC, WLWD 



PROGRAM: 50-50 Club 



hOUSehOld carpets 



SPONSOR: Pettijohn's Floor Coverings AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Mr. Petti John, the owner 
of a carpet store, delivers his own commercials on Hop- 
along Cassidy each Thursday at 6 p.m. He attributes his 
astounding success to Hoppy's popularity and the infor- 
mality of his commercial messages. "We certainly have 
had good results," he says. "Why, on one day folloiving 
our show we made more than $3,000 worth of sales at- 
tributable to the program." Time charge for each pro- 
gram is $164.35 on contract. 



KPHO-TV, Phoenix, Ariz. 



PROGRAM: Hopalong Cassidy 



household 



cookware 



SPONSOR: Permanent Stainless Steel Prod. AGENCY: Direct 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When this Fresno firm in- 
dicated an interest in television, KBID-TV set up a test 
schedule. Two mid-afternoon participations were placed 
in the Dave Williams Show, a program of music and 
chatter. Sets of stainless steel cookware were demon- 
strated and sold directly on the show. As a result of the 
test the firm sold $1,820 worth of merchandise. Cost of 
the participation: $70. A few days later the company 
signed for a continuing program. 



KBID-TV, Fresno 



PROGRAM: Dave Williams Show 



household 



jar lid 



SPONSOR: Peter Pan Peanut Butter AGENCY: Needham, 

Louis & Brorby, Inc. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: On 18 February, Ruth Ly- 
ons, f emcee of the 50-50 Club, told her viewers that they 
could get a plastic refrigerator jar lid free. All they had 
to do was send Miss Lyons a self-addressed stamped 
envelope. The next day 1,267 requests for the Peter Pan 
lids came into the station; the following Monday there 
were 3,411 requests and by the first of March 5,269. 
A one-minute live participation costs $230. 



WLWT, Cincinnati, WLWC, 
Columbus, WLWD, Dayton 



PROGRAM: 50-50 Club 



56 



SPONSOR 



WORLDS OF EXTRA COVERAGE! 

In the rich trading area of Lima, Ohio, there are 45,000 TV families for a 
saturation of 81.1 percent . . . and here more people watch WHIO-TV than 
all the other TV stations combined. Outside of the primary area, LIMA 
IS 80 MILES FROM DAYTON. It's just one of the MANY outside bonus 
areas in WHIO-TV's coverage of 511,310 families. Here are the ARB facts 
and figures: 



CHANNELS 


VIEWED MOST 


IN 


LIMA, 


OHIO 




Station Viewed 


Most 


Station Viewed Most 


Channel City 


Before 6 P.M. 




After 6 P.M. 


WHIO-TV Dayton 


66 






66 


Station B (UHF) 


7 






24 


Station C 


5 






5 


Station D 


3 






3 




These figures prove the eyes and ears of this world are tuned to WHIO-TV, one of 
America's great AREA stations, using one of the world's tallest towers (1104 ft.) 
and the equivalent of 316,000 watts. It's America's best buy in TV — and if you 
don't believe it ask our world representative George P. Hollingbery. 



»t 



ONE OF 

AMERICA'S 

GREATEST 

AREA 

STATIONS 



ftJtTOK L *•? JrdEnrf t * * ■ U,n w/ ^ \ 1 WV 



CASS 
O 
anspor 



, HO 
WA8ASH 

Wabash 



Kbkomo o 



jitingto 

Brews 

fTON 

Narren O BlumOU 



Decatur) 
O 
A D fc M Sj 

„o 

Berne 



i Manrw 

. /ostori* N 

fOCK /~© Care * | CKA*F0*l> 1 « 



si 



Marion 

MAR'W 



MORwnw 

qMU 



katt'to 



whio-tv 



t ..jnp "' ^jjpi_=-_— — | y e ,«a,iles 

;iw«H,d| DE » £ p£ nCiiy 5 



SHELBY 

Sidney r 



^iaoison Muncie w inches ?e. 
«\ LcbMMq HAMttTO* '. r •«" roM^dd» Randolph 
,ie * Holies*? up ~ H^NRV 






CBS 



°^enia*"°| 

Sab mi a . 



L 



ShVbyville, 



Channel 
DAYTON, OHIO 



■vamBStfc.'. 



Greens 



Hopti 



ARB0RN 



R O/S 
iJGree'nfield/ <jCh2 



O 

; MONROE 



BROWN 



l_ 



Seyn«wfo 



INNINGS 

8.¥«rooit 
O 



RlPEf 



cievKO, ch?v,ot° Cincinnati 

*^ ^~li ^-»lCl ■[ OBatavia 

" ic le'r! 



Hilisbon 
HIGHLAND 



HgfrO 



IS 



umtm j jAasoH^^ftsij^fj 

- ©Bedford crother^* 1^^ ^rc*so* 



scuno 

^ ttew&ostrg 



Mitchell 
O 



frtftcHttek 



o S*f«m 



hUttK | WASHINGTON 



T olONewportBethel BROWN 

Covington +2fe?i j& h mor l^ r ' 

~%T\ " IWl BELJ 

£ERLANCf 

\PENDLET0 

. grant \ &\ Mays*Bk° 1 ~ Gf8 . wup 

rottton-x \ , O faimoutt! j ~\ tyson vanoeberg / 



£H /j™** Portsmouth**^ 

i i MASON VtnMborg / GREtfl 






What does it take to make 
friends out of viewers? 



Getting people to turn a dial to a television program is one thing. Getting those 
people to feeling that the station they tuned to is a friend . . . that the station 
can be counted on for truth, honesty, for the fulfillment of their needs and ex- 
pectations is what brings a station close to its viewers. It is this audience-con- 
scious station policy, this constant search to provide the finest in news and 
entertainment for the people of its area, that converts viewers into friends for 
a television station. 



Such is the wonderful, wonderful relationship that exists between WMCT, 
Memphis . . . and its friends. 



s 



uch is the bond of sincere good will, deep loyalty, and confidence that has been 
built between WMCT, Memphis and its friends, the people who make up its vast 
audience of more than 400,000 homes. 

This great friendship did not come about overnight. 



It has been a steady-building thing, a mutual feeling of good will that has devel- 
oped since the inception of WMCT's parent station WMC Radio, back in 1923. For ever 
since that time, WMC and WMCT have constantly pioneered for the best interest of 
its listeners and viewers. Practically everything new in electronics has first found its 
way to Memphis and the Mid-South through WMC and WMCT. It has pioneered in 
FM. It has pioneered in TV. It was the first TV station in Memphis, originating early 
in 1948. For six years it was the only TV station in Memphis. When color was first 
developed. WMCT, for almost 18 months, was the only television station equipped to 
transmit color. Soon, live color cameras will be made available to broadcast local color 
programs through WMCT. WMCT is the only TV station in Memphis with its own 
developing and printing facilities. This completely modern equipment makes it pos- 
sible to telecast news within a few minutes after that news has been filmed on the spot. 

Every improvement to render a better service for its friends, every modern broad- 
casting and telecasting device was brought and is being brought to the Memphis audi- 
ence through WMC and WMCT. 

It's important to take this opportunity to list the reasons why this great friend- 
ship exists between station and viewers, in order that Time Buyers, Account Execu- 
tives, yes and Clients, themselves, might know just how a station becomes a part of 
the very lives of the people it serves, and with what great degree of responsibility a sta- 
tion views its obligations to its viewers. It would have been easy (and relatively inex- 
pensive) to provide a push-button and turn-table type of service. While a great num- 



ber of viewers would have been won that way, WMCT felt a greater need to provide 
a complete telecasting service for its friends. For that reason WMCT's Farm Program 
is a vehicle that has won literally thousands upon thousands of friends for the station. 
Derek Rooke, WMCT's Farm Director, covers scores of counties in his Station Wagon 
weekly, gathering news and views of farmers with the sole object in view of providing 
a more all-inclusive farm service. Mr. Rooke's sound-on-film camera captures inter- 
views with farmers, themselves, and on each program he brings to the viewers a com- 
plete area weather report. He provides the means for the WMCT farm audience to see 
people they know, friends in their own community, on television. That service has 
built a warm friendship among farmers ... a friendship that means something to the 
viewer. 

WMCT is the only television station in Memphis with such complete farm infor- 
mation and facilities to serve the farmers. 

Complete mobile equipment enables WMCT to pick up local programs, sports 
events, and programs originating outside of our studios that are of special civic interest 
to the people of the community. 

CHILDREN? Programs like Trent Wood's Storyland do more than provide enter- 
tainment. They provide a means for the station to have children in this area become 
part of the broadcasts themselves. 

WOMEN'S PROGRAMS? WMCT maintains a full-time women's director, Cathy 
Bauby, who designs and custom-tailors her show to the needs and interests of women 
throughout WMCT's territory. Furthermore, WMCT's Homemaker program, with 
Carolyn Godman, receives thousands of pieces of mail a month, testifying to the tre- 
mendous interest the show inspires among home-makers. 

Management, and members of the station personnel, have always given fully 
of their time and talent to every worthwhile civic and community project in Memphis 
and the Mid-South. Production Executives have produced, directed, narrated and 
filmed features for the Red Cross, Community Chest, Fire Department, City Beautiful, 
Traffic Department and practically every major activity of civic betterment. Manage- 
ment has long been active in the field of Broadcasting, holding many important com- 
mittee posts in national organizations. Recently WMCT received the Sylvania Award 
and the Freedom Foundation Award for the excellence of its locally produced pro- 
grams in the public interest. 

The same integrity that has characterized The Commercial Appeal for the past 
century in its service to the public, has been maintained by WMC and WMCT. 

So, day after day, month after month, as its viewers realize and accept these 
contributions to their well-being, they have developed this deep and unspoken appre- 
ciation for the station. Actually, it is a strong and durable friendship, built on the solid 
ground of consideration for every segment of the people who make up the great Mem- 
phis territory. For the years ahead, WMCT pledges a continuance of the policies that 
have built these friendships. This is a great public trust, this business of telecasting; 
and those of you who are interested in converting these friends into your customers, 
can be sure WMCT in Memphis will continue having the finest in entertainment, the 
important events of each day, and the best in local talent, all keyed to the needs and 
best interests of its viewers. 

Thus, can our friends become your friends. 



TV RESULTS 



household 



kitchens 



SPONSOR: Wholesale Building AGENCY: Direct 

& Supply Co. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When this building and 

supply firm decided to try television they selected a late 
movie on Friday nights as a test vehicle. A model kitchen 
was assembled in the studio for commercials. In the first 
five weeks of the 13-week contract, the firm gained enough 
leads to keep their salesmen busy for three months. They 
were forced to drop the show until the fall in order to 
catch up. An announcement a week has been substi- 
tuted. Average sale from program leads was $1,000. 
WREX-TV, Rockford, 111. PROGRAM: Film 



household km 



SPONSOR: Macy's Gift Shop AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: During Thanksgiving week, 
Macy's bought two participations, one in a late after- 
noon program (Harry Smith Show), one in a late eve- 
ning show (Moonlight Playhouse), to advertise a set of 
steak knives priced at $4.95. For purposes of the live 
demonstration, the advertiser left nine sets at WSUN-TV. 
The day after the final commercial, he came to the sta- 
tion to pick up the sets, and found they had been sold. 
From the two announcements, Macy's sold over 1,300 
sets of steak knives — that's $6,500 in business from an 
investment of $75. 
WSUN-TV, St. Petersburg, Fla. PROGRAM: Participations 



household 



pets 



SPONSOR: Sevier's Pet Center AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Participating on Hospital- 
ity House from 5-5:30 over KSBW-TV for 13 weeks, Sev- 
ier's Pet Center grew from just another pet shop to fourth 
in pet supply and food sales in California. The very first 
show brought over 200 letters and cards. Some were 
comments on the shotv, some were entries into a contest 
and others were inquiries about advertised products. All 
the pets offered for sale or free were spoken for within 
one half hour after the show. Cost per half hour $99. 

KSBW-TV, Salinas, Cal. PROGRAM: Hospitality House 



household 



plastic wrap 



SPONSOR: Dow Chemical AGENCY: MacManus, John & Adams 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: To introduce its plastic film 
wrapping product, Saran Wrap, Dow purchased several 
participations on KPTV's Friend of the Family, a daily 
daytime half -hour woman's show. Mike Davenport, star 
of the program, offered a free sample of Saran Wrap to 
all viewers writing him and requesting it. After only 
two announcements, 1,600 written requests had poured 
into the station. Cost per participation: $60. 
KPTV, Portland, Ore. PROGRAM: Friend of the Family 



household 



premiums 



SPONSOR: Pet Milk Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: p et Milk had been sponsor- 
ing Ziv's Cisco Kid (lip-synchronized in Spanish) in 
Puerto Rico for four months. In a special promotion, 
they offered one autographed photo of Cisco {Duncan 
Renaldo) or one autographed photo of his side-kick, 
Pancho (Leo Carillo) in exchange for two Pet Milk 
labels. Each photo also carried a greeting in Spanish. 
Up to 15 December, Pet Milk gave away a total of 67,000 
photos, renewing their initial photo order seven times. 
Since Puerto Rico boasts only 40,000 tv sets, the sponsor 
considers the figure of 67,000 amazingly high. 
KWAQ-TV, San Juan, P.R. PROGRAM: Cisco Kid 



household 



records 



SPONSOR: Whitehouse Co. AGENCY: Parker Adv. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: I n order to promote its 
package of 18 Top Tunes in the Denver area, the White- 
house Company tried daytime tv. Whitehouse bought 
participations on Casey Kemp's Two Gun Theatre, a 
Western film strip, running Monday through Saturday. 
In the first five days sponsor received 220 direct orders; 
Saturdays show brought 197 more orders. Record pack- 
age was priced at $2.98; gross sales were $1,223.66 in 
those six days. Cost to sponsor was $451. For each 
dollar invested Whitehouse received $2.72 in immedi- 
ate direct sales. 
KOA-TV, Denver PROGRAM: Casey Kemp's Two Gun Theatre 



household 



rugs 



SPONSOR: Persian Rug Renovating Co. ACENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Vartan Kuchukian, owner 
of the Persian Rug Co., had a heavy inventory of do- 
mestic rugs and decided to use WISE-TV to promote his 
summer sale. He bought 15 announcements on various 
nighttime shows during one week. The cost of his televi- 
sion advertising (he did no other advertising) was $300, 
while his total sales were $6,000. Kuchukian commented : 
". . . we did a dollar volume 20 times greater than the 
amount expended for the advertising!" 

WISE-TV, Asheville, N. C. PROGRAM: Announcements 



household 



sewing machines 



SPONSOR: Rodney Sewing Machine Go. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When you're trying to find 
the right customer for your product, stimulate business 
or cut down on returns, television is the answer accord- 
ing to I. Rattier, v.p. of the Rodney Sewing Machine Co. 
Rodney's first test campaign on television ran for one 
week and cost $500. In that week they did $10,000 worth 
of business. Campaign consisted of one announcement a 
day running two and a half minutes long and using a 
straight merchandising approach. 



WXIX-TV, Milwaukee 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



60 



SPONSOR 




WCPO-TV 

CINCINNATI 

and 

WEWS 

CLEVELAND 
announce the appointment of 

BLAIR 



as national representative 
effective January 1, 1956 



WCPO-TV 


— -j*p= — = 


WEWS 


Channel 9 


Bjj^^jjM 


Channel 5 


ABC-TV NETWORK 


1 ' ■ 


ABC-TV NETWORK 


CINCINNATI 6, OHIO 


\ snupps -itowAjw 1 


CLEVELAND 14, OHIO 




SCRIPPS-HOWARD RADIO, INC 



9 JANUARY 1956 



61 



TV RESULTS 



household 



SPONSOR: Rodney, Inc. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: After six months on 

WXIX-TV, the sponsor wrote to the station and said 
that "our costs {on WXIX-TV ") have been brought doivn 
lower than costs of other media. . . . I also have found 
that my closures are very high . . . For a $500 expenditure 
we did $10,000 worth of sewing machine business. It 
has perked up our sales organization. . . . We are very 
pleased with your station and hope to continue without 
interruption for years to come . . ." 
WXIX-TV, Milwaukee PROGRAM: Announcements 



household 



tools 



SPONSOR: Grant Tool Co. AGENCY: Arthur Meyerhoff & Co. 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The sponsor bought a five- 
minute program at sign-off on Saturday nights. In six 
weeks 2,510 orders were pulled by the program; each 
order was for an item costing $1.98. Every time the 
program was telecast an average of 418 orders was 
received; each program cost $125. Thus sales amounted 
to about seven times the advertising cost. The sponsor at 
first renewed for three weeks, renewed again for six weeks 
and then renewed again for 13 weeks. 
WBTV. Charlotte PROGRAM: Gay Blades 



houses 



SPONSOR: Various Norfolk realtors AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: WV EC-TV recently began 
a new program series called Tv Real Estate Guide on 
Sundays, 12:30-1:00 p.m., with seven real estate brokers 
participating. Five of the brokers reported they got in- 
quiries on Sunday afternoon — right after the first pro- 
gram. The station says so many more realtors have 
signed for the show that it was extended from 30 minutes 
to an hour. They feel that informative programing in 
this field brings maximum results. Each participation 
costs $51.75. 

WVEC-TV, Hampton-Norfolk PROGRAM: Tv Real Estate 

Guide 



houses 



new homes 



SPONSOR: Tilton Homes Corp. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: After the Tilton Homes 
Corp. had been sponsoring the film program, I Am the 
Law, weekly for six weeks on WREX-TV, a representative 
of the firm stated: "Prospective home buyers have been 
arriving at our Rochelle (Illinois) offices every day of 
the week, some from as far away as 100 miles. Response 
caused us to add another salesman." Commercials were 
delivered over live cards showing every phase of opera- 
lion in the construction of these homes. 

WREX-TV, Rockford, 111. PROGRAM: I Am the Law 



houses 



new homes 



SPONSOR: Veterans Loan & Realty Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: /„ order to push the sale 
of homes in a new development, the Veterans Loan & 
Realty Co. placed a schedule of announcements on WJBF. 
Homes sold for $6,500. In a one-day campaign of five 
announcements 53 houses were sold. By the end of the 
week all 85 homes in the subdivision were sold. Com- 
pany grossed sales of $552,500 from an expenditure of 
$192.50. Veterans Loan & Realty reports it is amazed at 
the impact television had on its sales. 
WJBF, Augusta, Ga. PROGRAM: Announcements 



houses 



new homes 



SPONSOR: Chicago Builders AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Twelve houses in the high- 
price field were sold as the result of a single one-minute 
participation in WBBM-TV's In Town Tonight. The 
builder made $350,000 in sales at no cost on the Borg 
Warner's shoiv. L. J. Gradishaw, Berwin, III. reports 
"Three people tvho have their own lots came in and 
wanted to build as soon as possible. Nine others will 
build as soon as we can get them desirable locations." 
In Town Tonight is a nighttime variety, on which local 
contractors are allowed to show their latest homes. 



WBBM-TV, Chicago 



PROGRAM: 



In Town Tonight, 
participation 



houses si 



tes 



SPONSOR: Ohio Valley Realty Corp. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Within six weeks of its 
first plunge into local television, Ohio Valley Realty sold 
all its housing sites. Campaign involved one-minute an- 
nouncements and I.D.'s, scheduled more heavily on Mon- 
days and Saturdays. Announcements were placed around 
fight talks, wrestling, films and local live shows. Com- 
pany also made a point of offering special inducements, 
like a book on housing plans, during their weekly an- 
nounmements. Announcements cost $85; I.D.'s, $29.75. 
WCPO-TV, Cincinnati PROGRAM: Announcements, I.D.'s 



houses 



summer cabins 



SPONSOR: Eufaula Sportsmans Club AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: In order to spread the news 
of available cabins and cabin sites in Eufaula, Okla., 
the Eufaula Sportsmans Club bought a one-minute an- 
nouncement at 10:20 p.m. Within six days of this single 
announcement, it sold 100 cabins, ivith a gross of $60,000. 
It still has 200 phone calls and 60 post cards to check, 
but sales were so rapid that the club hadn't time to fol- 
low them through at the outset. The announcement cost 
$120, brought in $500 for each ad dollar spent. 

WKY-TV, Oklahoma City PROGRAM: Announcement 



62 



SPONSOR 



LoaxxtmAj gcua. (^ lh^potWt> 




"We ought to know . . . there's a bank 
and a wine shoppe right next door. 



But in Louisville . . . 

WHAS-TV Programming pays off! 






P\ 




HJHhjL. •' 





"SPORTRAITS" 

10:45 — 10:55 P. M. 
Monday through Friday 
(Market's only complete 
evening sportscast.) 



Are you participating? 



VICTOR A. SHOLIS, Director 

NEIL CLINE, Station Mgr. 

Represented Nationally by Harrington, 

Righter & Parsons, 

Associated with The Courier-Journal 
& The Louisville Times 




Your Sales Message Deserves 

The Impact of Programming of Character 



BASIC CBS-TV Network 



9 JANUARY 1956 



63 



TV RESULTS 



sporting goods 



SPONSOR: Hatfield's Hardware AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Hatfield's wanted to pro- 
mote a special Grand Opening Day on a Saturday for 
Sea Horse Outboard Motors and General Marine Speed- 
liner Boats. They plugged the event on their Here's the 
Life program on KFEQ-TV, Friday, 7:30-45 p.m., and 
an additional quarter-hour program the same evening. 
During the 30 days following this promotion, $14,000 
in sales were traced directly to the shows. Cost: $228. 

KFEQ-TV, St. Joseph, Mo. PROGRAM: Here's the Life 



sporting goods 



SPONSOR: Hawaii Pan Pacific Store 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: KON A decided to try 

something neiv for the. Hawaii Pan Pacific commercials 
on the All American Game program. Station featured 
its oivn salesman, Fred Briggs, in live commercials pat- 
terned for him. Results for Pan Pacific, distributors of 
Wilson and Brunswick sporting goods, were substantial: 
After the first two weeks sponsor reported that 200 
bowling balls had been sold. The average for the rear 
is about 600. Also 20 complete sets of Wilson golf clubs, 
at $200 a set, were sold. Pan Pacific's cost for each 
game was $300. 



KONA, Honolulu 



PROGRAM: All American Game 



sporting goods 



SPONSOR: Stubbs Hardware Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When WTOC-TV decided 
to adapt a radio shoiv of long standing to tv, the Stubbs 
Hardware Co. realized that this uould be a good buy for 
them. Program, The Old Salt, is presented Tuesday 
nights from 7 to 7:15 p.m. and features a well-known 
local sportsman who gives hunting and fishing news. 
Sponsor uses show to feature certain items it has in 
stock, each week featuring a different special. Show has 
proved so effective that many weeks items mentioned 
have been completely sold out. Program cost, $80 a week. 

WTOC-TV, Savannar PROGRAM: The Old Salt 



sporting goods 



SPONSOR: Pickard's Sporting Goods AGENCY: Dired 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When this local sporting 

goods store decided to lest tv's sales effectiveness for their 
type of merchandise, they bought one-half of WMFD's 
Gone Fishing show on a one-time only basis. This 
program is heard on Fridays between 8:15 and 8:30 p.m. 
The cost was $44. These results were immediate: 15 
complete rod and reel outfits plus one of the store's 
largest outboard motors were sold to viewers. The client 
credits better results from this sponsorship than from any 
other advertising venture. 

WMFD, Wilmington, N. C. PROGRAM: Gone Fishing 



sporting goods 9 oif dubs 



SPONSOR: Schindler's Jewelry Store AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Schindler's promoted a spe- 
cial golf club offer using KVTV as its only advertising 
medium. The offer: A five-club special set priced at 
$24.95. The promotion: Five announcements on KVTV. 
The results : Sale of 120 golf club sets — including sales to 
10 members of KVTV's staff who fell for their own com- 
mercials. After three weeks, sales are still booming. Cost 
of the announcements was $230. 

KVTV, Sioux City PROGRAM: Announcements 



sporting goods 



gym sets 



SPONSOR: T. S. Martin Co. 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: I n a single 60-second par- 
ticipation on Kids Korner, heard Friday afternoons 
(5:05-5:30), this firm advertised an outdoor gym set for 
children priced at $29.95. A $3.25 basketball was offered 
as a bonus to customers who mentioned the announce- 
ment. This offer was good, however, only on the Saturday 
and Monday following the broadcast. The store reported 
that a total of 41 sets were sold in these two days, bring- 
ing in a total revenue of $1,227.95. The cost of the single 
participation was only $40. 



KVTV, Sioux City 



PROGRAM: Kids Korner 



sporting goods 



gym sets 



SPONSOR: Pe?.rlman"s 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: This Asheville furniture 
store used one live commercial over WISE-TV to adver- 
tise gym sets. Art Pernitiz, Pearlman's sales manager, 
said, "The response to the announcement was so great 
we sold out the item before our shipment arrived. We've 
had to reorder this twice, with a larger quantity in- 
volved in each order. All in all, Fd say our sales are 
more than 300% above our expectations." The cost of 
the single announcement was $40. (WISE-TV, inciden- 
tally, is a uhf station). 



WISE-TV, Asheville, N. C. 



PROGRAM: Announcement 



sporting goods 



SPONSOR: Minnesota Blue Cross AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Minnesota Blue Cross, to 
contribute to highway safety, developed a Scotchlite- 
coated version of their famous emblem to attach to car 
bumpers as a safety reflector. The emblem was offered 
on three noon newscasts, two 10 p.m. news reports. The 
first mail brought in 551 requests. A week later the de- 
mand had risen to 565 requests a day. Within a month a 
total of 25,800 had been delivered. 

WCCO-TV. Minneapolis-St. Paul PROGRAM: Newscasts 



64 



SPONSOR 



TV RESULTS 



various 



cartoon contest 



SPONSOR: Wishbone Salad Dressing Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Wishbone Salad Dressing 
Co. sponsors the Thursday portion of the 6:00-6:30 p.m. 
children s strip, The Little Rascals, on WEWS. To test 
the effectiveness of the show, hostess Mary Ellen invited 
viewers to enter her Funny Face Cartooning contest. 
Only one announcement was used in the Thursday show, 
but 6,000 letters were received in response to the an- 
nouncement. With test results more than satisfactory, 
the company had a basis for future ad beaming. Wish- 
bone's time outlay for the show on a weekly basis is $406. 

WEWS, Cleveland PROGRAM: The Little Rascals 

VariOUS cigars 

SPONSOR: Bayuk Cigars AGENCY: Ellington & Co. 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When the D. Kurman Co. 
in Milwaukee added Phillies cigars to their line, Bayuk 
Cigars added WXIX-TV to their station lineup for 
the Saturday night fights (9:00 p.m.). Soon after, 
salesmen reported Milwaukee dealers showed a strong de- 
sire to take on the line because patrons were asking for 
the cigar advertised on the boxing matches. Many new 
accounts resulted and sales increased steadily. 



WXIX-TV, Milwaukee 



PROGRAM: Saturday Night 
Boxing Matches 



VariOUS coloring sets 



SPONSOR: American Pencil Co. AGENCY: Doyle Dane 

Bernbach 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Ever since 4 October when 
Herb Sheldon started filling in and coloring a picture 
a week on his early morning show sales have tripled for 
the American Pencil Co. The Venus Paradise set he 
uses is also promoted in stores with pictures of Herb 
Sheldon. The show is geared to both children and 
mothers by teaming Herb Sheldon ivith Josephine Mc- 
Carthy, who has a home-cooking segment. Sponsor buys 
participations on four shows a week, cost is $850. 

WRCA-TV, New York PROGRAM: Herb Shelden 

with Josephine McCarthy 

various comic books 

SPONSOR: Richfield Oil Co. AGENCY: Hixon-Jorgenson 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The sponsor had distribut- 
ed special giveaway comic books to its gas stations in 
the Portland area. But the books weren't moving so Rich- 
field bought participations in KPTV's Toymaker show 
(4:30-5:00 p.m., weekdays). After five announcements 
20,000 books had been given away. An additional 5,000 
were shipped in from another town and they were gone 
almost immediatley. In less than two weeks 30,000 
books were given away. Tv cost: $600. 

KPTV, Portland PROGRAM: The Toymaker 



VariOUS curler 



SPONSOR: Weaver Products AGENCY: Gregory & House 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Tv was the only medium 
used to promote Spoolie Hair Curlers after their intro- 
duction in the Portland area. At first the sponsor signed 
for daily participations on Friend of the Family for 
three weeks, but at the end of that period he signed for 
two announcements weekly for another two months. 
Spoolies advanced from a product with almost no dis- 
tribution to a product sold in every department, drug 
and variety store in the area, with total business exceed- 
ing $82,000. Total expenditure: $2,000. 



KPTV, Portland, Ore. 



PROGRAM: Friend of the Family 



various d r 



SPONSOR: Auto Dine- Drive-In AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: To perk up business the 
sponsor used one-minute live announcements. Talent com- 
pared regular hamburgers with Auto Dine's "Bigger 
Burgers." The campaign ran for six weeks and business 
doubled. As a matter of fact, some people had to be 
turned away because it was impossible to serve so many 
orders. Because of this, the sponsor did not renew, but 
expects to use live spots again if need arises. 

KCSJ-TV, Pueblo, Colo. PROGRAM: Announcements 



VariOUS drugs 



SPONSOR: Preston Drugs AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Sponsoring the half -hour 
TPA film program, Ellery Queen Show, Preston Drugs 
sold over 1,000 aluminum tumblers after promoting them 
on the show. President Wayne Preston reports, "Every 
subsequent promotion, regardless of product, has been a 
sell-out." In addition, the drug stores have traced many 
other direct sales to the show, find "public acceptance not 
evident with any other type of advertising." Cost of the 
show: $125 per week. 
WJHP, Jacksonville PROGRAM: Ellery Queen Show 



VariOUS jewelry 



SPONSOR: Jordan's Jewelers 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Starting with one 10-second 
announcement a week in November 1953, this jewelry 
shop increased its schedule gradually until it began spon- 
soring Amos V Andy on Thursdays from 10:30 to 11 
in the fall of 1954. At the end of 1954 the books showed 
that gross business had increased 44% over 1953. In 
addition Jordan's was first in the city in sale of Sunbeam 
Appliances, Bulova watches and General Electric radios. 
Show costs $235 per week. 



KVTV, Sioux City, Iowa 



PROGRAM: Amos V Andy 



9 JANUARY 1956 



65 



■■■-'**■ J^4 



TREVOR 



HOWARD 



abc-tv's 



rnoon 



GUYN» S 






V«$> 



m»cha£i- 



estival 



H****' 



MASON 



^ 






^wgs 



sTeWAR 



T gra ngER 



ifi& 4 



-rv™ 



CUAVJO 



e rM* s 




E 





ALLYN EDWARDS-YOUR HOST 



amous film stars. Great production values. Modern top- 
flight movies never before shown on television. These are 
the elements that make up ABC-TV's exciting, new day- 
time show, "Afternoon Film Festival," starting January 
16, 1956. Each weekday (3 to 5 PM, EST) TV viewers 
will watch a full-length, truly fine motion picture. Among 
the 100 titles on the schedule are such greats as : The Cruel 
Sea, Genevieve, Hungry Hill, A Queen Is Crowned, The 
Titfield Thunderbolt, Desperate Moment, This Happy 
Breed, The Captive Heart. For advertisers this should 
well be the buy of '56. It's nighttime quality TV at a new, 
low, daytime price. A flexible buying plan. A time slot 
which research indicates should produce excellent ratings. 
Plus personable Allyn Edwards, who will be available to 
deliver your sales message. 





abc television network 



7 West 66th St., New York 23, New York, SUsquehanna 7-5000 
20 North Wacker Drive, Chicago, Illinois, ANdover 3-0800 
277 Golden Gate, San Francisco, UNderhill 3-0077 




film shows recently made available for syndication 



Show name 



Syndicator 



Producer 



Length 



No. in series 



Show name 



Syndicator 



Producer 



Length 



No. in series 



ADVENTURE 



DOCUMENTARY 



Adventures of 

Dr. Fu Manchu 
Adventures of 

the Falcon 
Adventurei of 

Long John Silver 
Armchair 

Adve.jtures 
Camera's Eye 
Captain Gallant 
China Smith 
Count of Monte 

Crlsto 
Cross Current* 
Crunch & Des 
Dangerous 

Assignment 
Dateline Europe* 
Gadabout Gaddis 

Headline 

I Spy 
International 

Playhouse 
Joe Palooka 
Jungle Adventures 
Jungle Jim 
King's C ossroads 
Man Called X 
New Adventures 

•f China Smith 
Orient Express 
Overseas 

Adventures* 
Passport to Oanger 
Ramar Of Th» 

Jungle 
Safari 

Secret File, U.S.A. 
Sheena. Queen of 

the Jungle 
Soldiers of 

Fortune** 
Tales of the 

Foreign Legion 
Terry and the 

Pirates 
This World of Ours 
The Three 

Musketeers 
Top Secret 
Tropic Hazard 
Uncommon Valor 
Wonders of the 

Wild 

•Formerly titled "Foreign Intrigue." 

••Sponsored by 7-Up In 120 markets, but many are open on alternate-week basis. 

CHILDREN'S SHOWS 



Hollywood Tv 

Service 
NBC Film Div. 

CBS TV Film 

Storling 

Sterling 
TPA 
NTA 
TPA 

Official 

NBC Film Div. 

NBC Film Div. 

Official 
Sterling 

MCA-TV 

Guild 

NTA 

Guild 

Sterling 

Screen Gesas 

Storling 

Ziv 

NTA 

NTA 
Official 

ABC Film Synd. 
TPA 

Sterling 
Official 
ABC Film Synd. 

MCA-TV 

CBS TV Film 

Official 

Sterling 
ABC Film 

Flamingo 

Sterling 

General Teleradio 

Storling 



Studio City Tv 

Prod. 
Federal Telefilms 

Joe Kaufman 

Sterling 

TeeVeo Prod. 
Frantel 

Berna-d Tabakin 
Leon Fromkess 

Official 

Bermuda Prod. 

Donlevy Develop- 
ment Corp. 

Sheldon Reynolds 

Beacon Tv 
Features 

Gross- Krasne 

Guild 

Mutual Tv 
Enterprises 

Guild 

Explorers Pictures 

Screen Gems 

Storling 

Ziv 

Bernard Tabakla 

John Nasht 
Sheldon Reynolds 

Hal Roach. Jr. 
Arrow Prod. 

Sterling 
Triangle Prod. 
Nassour 

Revue 

Tony Bartley 

Dougfair Prod. 

Dudley Pictures 
Thetis Film 

Marion Parsonnet 
Sterling 
Executive Prod. 
Borden Prod. 



30 min. 

30 min. 

30 ssin 

15 min. 

15 min. 
30 mm. 
30 min. 
30 min. 

30 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 

30 min. 
15 min. 

30 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 

30 min. 
15 min. 
30 min 
30 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 

30 min. 
3G min. 

30 min. 
30 tain. 

30 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 

30 rain 

30 min. 

30 min. 

15 min. 
30 min. 

15 min. 
15 min. 
30 min. 
15 min. 



13 

39 

26 

39 

39 
39 
26 

In production 

39 
39 
39 

39 
26 

39 
In production 
26 

26 
39 
26 
90 
In production 
28 

26 
39 

39 
52 

26 
26 
26 

In production 

26 

18 

26 
26 

26 
In production 
26 
39 



Animal Time 


Storling 


Sterling 


15 


min. 


52 


Animated 


General Teleradio 


Lotte-Reinger 


Ift 


min. 


26 


Fairy Tales 












Betsy and the 


Sterling 


Jamieson Features 


15 


mm. 


39 


Magic Key 












Cartoons 


Sterling 


Sterling 


5 


mm. 


79 


Fearless Fosdick 


Sterling 


Times Tv Corp. 


30 


mm. 


13 


Flash Gordon 


UM&M 


UM&M 


30 


mm. 


39 


Ray Forrest 


Storling 


Ray Forrest 


30 


mm. 


26 


Show 












Hans Christian 


Interstate 


Scan-American 


30 


mm. 


26 


Andersen 












Jet Jackson 


Screen Gems 


Screen Gems 


30 


mm. 


39 


Junior Crossroads 


Storling 


Sterling 


15 


mm. 


175 


Superman 


Flamingo 


Superman Prod. 


30 


mm. 


52 


Superman Cartoons 


Flamingo 


Flamingo 


15 


mm. 


16 


Telecom ics 


Flamingo 


Flamingo 


15 


mm. 


165 



COMEDY 



Beulah 


Flamingo 




Roland Reed 


30 min. 


78 


Corliss Archer 


Ziv 




Ziv 


30 min. 


39 


Duffy's Tavern 


UM*M 




UM&M 


30 min. 


39 


The GolHhoros 


Guild 




Guild 


3n min. 


In p-oductl 


Great Glldersleeve 


NBC Film 


Div. 


Matthew Rapf 


30 min 


39 


Halls of Ivy 


TPA 




TPA 


30 min. 


39 


Hal Roach 


NTA 




Hal Roach 


30 min. 


7 


Lafftlme Show 












Hank McCune 


II M v M 




A. C. Burger 


30 min. 


52 


His Honor. 


NBC Film 


Div. 


Galahad Prod. 


30 min. 


39 


Homer BeM 












1 Married Jean 


1 nterstate 




Joan Davis 


30 min. 


98 


Life With 


Guild 




Guild 


30 min. 


65 


Elizabeth 












Life of Riley 


NBC Film 


Div. 


Hal Roach 


30 min. 


104 


Little Rascals 


Interstate 




Reach 


10 min. 


22—1 reel 


("Our Gang") 








20 min. 


68 — 2 reel 


Leeney Tunes 


Guild 




Warner's 


15 min. te 
one hour 


Library 
191 


My Hero 


Official 




Four Star Prod. 


30 min. 


33 


My Little Margie 


Official 




Hal Roach. Jr.- 
Roland Reed 


30 min. 


126 


Susie (Private 


TPA 




Ctiertok Tv 


30 min. 


52 


S»eretarv) 












Trouble With 


Guild 




Hal Roach. Jr.- 


30 min. 


130 


Father 






Roland Reed 






Willy 


Official 




Desilou 


30 min. 


39 



The Big Idea 
Key to the City 

Kieran's 

Kaleidoscope 
Living Past 
Mr. President 
Science In Action 

Uncommon Valor 

Victory at Sea 
The World 
Around Us 



Donn Bennett 
Hollywood Tv 

Prod. 
ABC Film 

Film Classics 
Stuart Reynolds 
TPA 

General 

Teleradio 
NBC Film Div. 
Pictura Film 
Corp. 



Donn Bennett 
Hollywood Tv 

Prod. 
Paul Moss 

Film Classics 
Stuart Reynolds 
Calif. Academy 

of Sciences 
Executive 

Prod. Inc. 
Henry Salomon 
John Storer 



30 min. 
15 lain. 



15 min. 
SO mm. 
30 min. 

30 min. 

30 min. 
15 min. 



DO-IT-YOURSELF 



Junior Science 
Walt's Workshop 



UM* M 
Sterling 



UM(M 

Reld Ray Prod. 



15 min. 
30 min. 



DRAMA, CENERAL 



All Star 

Theatre**** 
Camera's Eye 
Captured***** 
Dr. Christian 
Dr. Hudson's 

Secret Journal 
Ce'ebrlty 

Playhouse* 
Confidential File 
Janet Dean 
Douglas Fairbanks, 

Jr. 
Favorite Story 
Flamingo 

Theatre 
Gangbusters 
Into'h. Night 
Invitation 

Playhouse 
I Led Three 

Lives** 
Charles Laughton 

Show 
Little Show 
Little Theater 
The James Mason 

Show 
Mr. District 

Attorney*** 
Conrad Nagel 
Paragon 

Playhouse****** 
Plav of 'he Week 
Publie Defender 
Scattergood Raines 
Science Fiction 

Thtatre 
Stage 7 
Ta'es Of 

Tomorrow 
The Greatest 

Drama 
The Passerby 
The Playhouse 
The Star & 

The Story 
The Visitor 
Top Plays of 1955* 
Tugboat Annie 
Wrong Number! 
Your Star Showcase 
Watch the World 



Screen Gems 

Sterling 

NBC Film Div. 

Ziv 

MCA-TV 

Screen Gems 

Guild 

ABC Film Synd. 

Ziv 

Flamingo 

General Teleradio 

Sterling 

Sterling 

Ziv 

Sterling 

Storling 

Sterling 
NTA 



Guild 

NBC Film Div. 

NTA 

Interstate 
CBS TV Film 
Ziv 



Screen Gems 

TeeVee Prod. 

Phillips H. Lord 

Ziv 

Sslow & Morgan 

Screen Gens 

Guild 

I'M* M 

Doug'as 

Fairbanks 
Ziv 
Telovideo 

V's"al Drama 
NTA 
TeeVee Prod. 

Ziv 

TeeVee Prod. 

NTA 

TeeVee Prod. 
Portland Prod. 

Ziv 

Andre Luotto 
Douglas Fair- 
banks. Jr. 
E-f-vard Lewis 
Hal Roach. Jr. 
j-hn Loveton 
Ziv 

Don Sharpe 
TeeVee Prod. 



TPA 
Sterling 

General Teleradio General Teleradio 



NTA 

ABC Film 
Official 

NBC Film Div. 

S^een Gems 

TPA 

Jnhn Christian 

TPA 

NBC Film Div. 



Ely Landow 
Meridian Prod. 
Four Star Prod. 

Marion Parsonnet 

Frank Wlsbar 

Chertok Tv 

John Christian 

V^r'ous 

NBC Film Div. 



30 min. 

15 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 

30 rain. 

30 min. 

?n nvn. 
30 mla. 

30 min. 
30 min. 

30 min. 
3" min. 
15 min. 

30 min. 

15 min. 

IS min. 
15 min. 
15 min. 



30 min. 
30 min. 

30 min. 
30 min. 
3" min. 
30 min. 

30 min. 
30 min. 



15 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 

30 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 
30 min. 
15 min. 



22 
7 



7 
3 
52 

26 

26 
26 



117 

In production 
26 
I (pilot) 
39 

39 

In production 
39 
117 

39 
30 

39 
18 
26 

117 

26 

32 
52 
26 



26 

39 

26 
69 
I (nilot) 
In production 

39 
26 



26 
52 
39 

44 
44 
In production 
I (pilot) 
52 
26 



•Ten similar fo Screen Oeros' "Ford Theatre." 

••Show 16 In third production cycle, sponsored by Phillips in 60 markets. 

•"Show Is In second production cycle, sponsored by Carter Products in 40 markets. 

••••Show is "Ford Star Theatre" in syndication. 

•••••Formerly "Gangbustcs" 

••♦"•Formerly "Douglas Fairbanks Presents" 



DRAMA. MYSTERY 



Badge 714 


NBC Film 


Div. 


Dragnet Prod. 


30 min. 


126 


Boston Blackie 


Ziv 




Ziv 


30 min. 


39 


Col. March of 


Official 




Panda Prod. 


30 min. 


26 


Scotland Yard 












Ellery Queen 


TPA 




Norman A 
i-ving Pineiro 


30 min. 


32 


Inner Sanettim 


NBC Film 


Div. 


Ga'ahad Prod. 


30 min. 


39 


Highway Patrol* 


Ziv 




7'v 


30 min. 


In prMuetl 


New Orleans 


UM&M 




Motion Picture 


30 min. 


26 


Pol le« Deot. 






A><v. Sve. Co. 






Paris Precinct 


UM&M 




Eto'le 


30 min. 


39 


Police Cell 


NTA 




Prock*or Tv 
Enter. 


30 min. 


Zfl 


Racket Squad 


ABC Film 




Carol Case 


30 min. 


98 


St-vker of 


Ho'lywood Tv 


Studio City TV 


30 min. 


13 


S»otland Yard 


Service 




Prod 






Sherlock Holmes 


UM&M 




S. H. TV Corp. 


30 min. 


3» 



•Sponsored by Ballantine in 84 Eastern markets. 



68 



SPONSOR 



Show name 



Syndicator 



Producer 



Length 



No. in series 



Show name 



Syndicator 



Producer 



Length 



No. in scries 



FEATURE 


Features Package 
17 Feature Films 
3C Feature Films 


Sterling Storling 
Genera. Teleradio Various 
General Teleradio Various 


1 hr. 
90 min. 
90 min. 


27 

17 
30 


HEALTH - MEDICAL 


Health and 

Happiness Club 
M.D. 


NTA NTA 
NTA NTA 


5 min. 
5 min. 


105 
39 


HOBBY 


Find a Hobby 


NTA Houston Color 
Film Labs 


26 


15 min. 


INTERVIEW 


The Li III Palmer 
Show 


NBC Film Oiv. Charles Kebbe 


15 min. 


26 


MUSIC 



SPORTS 



Adventures in 


Sterling 


Telenews Prod. 


15 min. 


26 


Sports 










Big H.ayback 


Screen Gems 


Screen Gems 


15 min. 


52 


The Bill Corum 


NTA 


Ely Landow 


15 min. 


26 


Sports Show 










Bowling Time 


Sterling 


Discovery Prod. 


1 hour 


13 


Championship 


Walter Schwim- 


Peter OeMet 


1 tour 


52 


Bowling 


mer Co. 








Jimmy Oemaret 


Award 


Award 


15 min. 


In production 


Show 










The Mad Whirl 


NTA 


Leo Seltzer 


30 min. 


26 


Sam Snead Show 


RCA Programs 


Scope Prod. 


5 mm. 


39 


Sport Review 


United Press 


United Press 


30 min. 


1 


of 1955 


Assoc. 


Assoc. 






Sports on Parade 


Storling 


Sterling 


15 min. 


75 


Time in for Sports 


Sterling 


Sterling 


15 nr.in. 


26 


Texas Rasslin'* 


Sterling 


Texas Rasslin' 
Inc. 


30 min. 
or 1 hour 


In produotion 


Tv's Baseball 


Flamingo 


Janus B. Harris 


15 m.n. 


78 


Hall of Famo 










Tv's Football 


Flamingo 


Ray Gordon 


15 min. 


26 


Hall of Famo 










•In continual production. 









TRAVEL 



Holiday 



Eddy Arnold Time 


Walter Schwlm- 


Eddy Arnold 


30 min. 


26 














Bandstand Revue 


mer Co. 
KTLA 
Bell 


KTLA 
Bell 


30 min 
15 min. 


6 
1 (pilot) 








VARIETY 






Bobby Breen Show 














Concert Hall 


Sterling 


Sterling 


15 min. 


175 


Beat the Experts 


Storling 




Te.enews Prod. 


5 min. 


56 


Frankie Laine 


Guild 


Guild 15 & 30 min. 


78 & 39 


Lddie Cantor 

Comedy 1 ntatre 
Hollywood Preview 


Ziv 




Ziv 


3u mm. 


39 


Abble Neal & Her 


NTA 


Warren Smith 


30 min. 


26 


Flamingo 




Balsan Produe- 


30 min. 


In production 


Ranch Girls 






















New Liberace 


Guild 


Guild 


30 min. 


In production 


Killiam Show 


Sterling 




Pau. Killiam 


15 min. 


26 


Show 










Mov.e Museum 


Sterling 




Paul Killiam 


15 mm. 


93 


Music of the 


NTA 


Jacques 


15 min. 


13 


Showtime 


btuuio Films 


Studio Films 


3U nun. 


39 


Masters 




Rachmilovich 






T.V. Court 


UM&M 




UM&M 


30 min. 


26 


Song Stories of 


Gibraltar 


Althea Pardee 


15 min. 


13 














the West 






















Stars ol the 


Flamingo 


Gannaway Prod. 


30 min. 


39 








WESTERNS 






Grand Ole Opry 


Storling 
Official 


Sterling 
Randall-Song Ad 

Jack Denovo 


15 min. 
30 mm 

30 min. 


13 

1 (pilot) 

a 














Serenades 
Story Bebind 
Your Music 
This Is Your 


Adventures of 
Kit Carson 
Burtalo Bill, Jr. 


MCA-TV 
CBS TV F 


Im 


Revue 
Flying "A" 


30 min. 
30 min. 


104 
In production 












Cisco Kid 


Ziv 




Ziv 


30 m.n. 


234 




Storling 






13 


Cowboy G-Men 


Flamingo 




I eh mount 


30 m.n. 


39 










Frontier Doctor 


Hollywood 


lele- 


Studio City Tv 


3D mm. 


In production 


Florian ZaBach 


Guild 


Guild 


30 min. 


39 


Gabby Hayes 


v.sioi Service 
UM&M 


UM&M 


30 min. 


52 












Gene Autry — Roy 

Rogers 
Hopa.ong Cassidy 

Judge Roy Bean 


MCA-TV 
NBC Film 
Screencraft 


Div. 


Republic 

Wm. Boyd Prod. 

Quintet Prod. 


1 hour 

30 min. 

1 hr. 
30 min. 


123 






NEWS 






52 
54 
39 


Drew Pearson 


UM&M 


UM&M 


15 min. 


39 


Cavalcade of 1955 


United Press 


United Press 


30 min. 


I 


Lasn La ue 


Storling 




National Tv Films 


15 min. 


39 




Assoc. 


Assoc. 






Tim McCoy 


UM&M 




UM&M 


15 min. 


39 


Exclusive 


General Teleradio 


George Johnson 


15 min. 


26 


Red Ryder 


CBS TV F 


ilm 


Flying "A" 


30 mm. 


1 (Pilot) 


Yesterday's 


Ziv 


Ziv 


30 min. 


39 


Stive Donovan. 


NBC Film 


Dlv 


Vi-bar 


30 min. 


39 












Western Marshal 






















Stories Of The 


Hollywood 


rv 


Studio City Tv 


30 min. 


39 












Century 
Tales Of The 


Service 
Screen Gems 


Prod. 
Screen Gems 


30 min. 








QUIZ 






26 










Texas Rangers 






















Western Package 


Sterling 




Storling 


1 hr. 


39 


Pantomino Quiz 


NTA 


Mike Stokey 


30 min. 


13 






















WOMEN'S 




















RELICION - 




























Amy Vanderbilt's 


NTA 




United Feature 


5 min. 


78 


Design for Living 


NTA 


NTA 


5 m n. 


39 


Etiquette 






Synd. 






Hand to Heaven 


NTA 


NTA 


30 min. 


13 


It's Fun To 


Guild 




Guild 


15 min. 


ISC 


Layman's Call 


NTA 


Transco Prod. 


5 min. 


52 


Reduce 












to Prayer 










Life Can Be 


ABC TV F 


ilms 


Trans-American 


15 min. 


5 (pilots) 


Man's Heritage 


NTA 


Ely Landow 


10 min. 


13 


Beautiful 














111 IMS 111 treil 



Initnation: Xhe success of animated 
commercials has apparently made 
sponsors more receptive to animated 
shows. Watch the Birdie, an animated 
children's quiz show, has sold so suc- 
cessfully that Richard H. Ullman re- 
ports his company's sales are uo 100% 
during the last five months compared 
to the first six months of this year. 



Sponsors who bought the show, 
which Uilman calls the only such show 
on tv, include Seven-Up, WTVJ-TV, 
Miami; Sealtest, KSD-TV, St. Louis; 
Malt-O-Meal, KTLA-TV, Los Angeles 
and WTTV-TV, Bloomington-Indi- 
anapolis, Ind. 

Swamped: Requests by civic groups 



for private showings of the tv film 
Confidential File has swamped the fa- 
cilities of Guild Films. Reub Kaufman, 
president of the firm, reports that more 
than 250 such requests have been re- 
ceived, though the show is on the air 
nationally only a few months. 

This figure is greater than the total 
of such requests for showings of all 
the other educational and civic-better- 
ment shows on tv since the start of the 
industry, noted Kaufman. Among the 
groups seeking showings are included 
the police departments of New York 
and San Antonio, Better Business 
groups, health departments, P.T.A.'s 
and other civic groups. 

The Guild president commented that 
"a show can be of public service and 
still knock the viewer out of his chair." 



9 JANUARY 1956 



69 




Miss KRON-TV 

assures a 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 

to 200 
. advertisers" a 




Scut ?*OHCi4C& 







AFFILIATED WITH THE S. F. CHRONICLE 
AND THE NBC-TV NETWORK ON CHANNEL 



Represented Nationally 
by Free & Peters, Inc. 

No. 9 in the series, "What Every Time 
Buyer Should Know About KRON-TV" 






70 



SPONSOR 



a r y 19 5 6 



TV COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PR 



MONDAY 



Garry Mowe 
Briatol-Myera 

DCSS 10_-10:15 

Serta B&l 

Staler M't RAR 

MNT lit m L 

V. br $3,140 



Arthur Godfrey 

D 10:30 -46 

iBntl-Mrr DCSS 

[ m. 10:45-11 

\ SOVar L 

• Itnul Va hr $3995 



Godfrey (cont'd) 

Lerer: pepsodenl 

mw 1111 IS 

, FOAB 

| Plllshurv Mill* 
I m -th 11 11 30 
I Burnett 51 itni 

Strike It - i RlelT 

Collate: tthpet; 

L t«1. auper suds 

' palmollve. fab. 

ajax 

T«NT I 

m-f 
Eaty 3.000 

' Valiant Lady 
| Scntt Taper JWT 
I S8NT m.w.f L 
$12,000 



Lava 


•f Llfa 


Ami" 


Home Pr 


I1TNT 


m f I. 


B-B-T 


$8500 



Setrrh far Tom'w 

PAO: Joyt 
MNT m t I, 

I B - p - T * HMIOO 

I GuMino Light 
|PAO: Ivory dint 
MNT m-f L 
Cempt $9,500 



lark Paar Shew 
|NT m-f u 

sust 



Love Story 
PAO- nrell 



1A«Oi m-f T, 
BAB V, hr $3nfh1 



Unh'-* O I ewll 

I J:1B mat 
*7VT Tj 

I Ijinnltn T*1,i« 
0-H "-70 
Dtion-in-Cie'it 
i' 4 hr 53.150 



I *rt I lrVlc«- 

T.erer- n.rf 

j *»TTv m tv.f I. 

BBDO (see bell 

Plll=htirr Mill" 

e)nnr mires 

54rTy m-th T. 
IB Mb' *">"• 



Rio PavntT 

rv>l»«fe- fah 

rhlm-onhrll *th 

n«t fn 1 "" hn- 

«TVY m-w.f Tj 

fan* ••• »*■* 
Esty •/, hr $.3000 



Bob Crosby 
Scott Finer O 
J. W. Thompson 

m 3-30-3:45 

pao 

Coiripton 

3:45-4 



Brighter Day 

PAG 

115VT m-f T, 

YAR $9000 

The Sarret Stern 
w TTome Prnda: 
ll«n m-f T, 
B-B.T $8,500 



On Your Account 

'Win Elliott) 
PAO- tlri>. nrell 
1J2NT m-f I 

B&B V: hr $3000 



No networs 

proeramln? 

ra-f 



Network 
programing 
discontinued 



Olni Dene 

School 

10-10:30 

PAO: BBAT 

tit in 10:16-30 

66Ch L 

■» hr $745 

'', hr $1,600 



Ernie Kovacs 

Show 

NT 1. 



No network 

programing 

m f 



m-f 1112 
91NT LAF 

(Women's icrtut 
program. For 
partle aponsora, 
there axe eight 
t in i ti commer- 
cials an huur 
available 
1 nun partlr 
lime A tal $7000 
I eee tu for 
aponjor Mat) 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Tenaaeeoe Ernie 

Ford Show 
Procter A Gamble 

12 12:15 set 
Hy m-f Tj 

Benton A Bowtee. 
'/« hr $2,700 

— Feather YeaaT 

Neat 

(quia Bud 

fbllyer) 

3blgate-Palmollye 

l»NT m-f L 

elt d 11:30-45 
Eity V* hr $2,700 



Ne network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 
programing 



TUESDAY 



Gerry Men 
MUee 1-ab. 
Wade Ad* 

tu 10-10: 15 
Kellogg' Burnett 

tu 10:15-30 

55 70NT L 

'/« hr $3,140 

Arthur r.odlrey 

Corn Produets 

C L. Millet 

Minn. Mining 

10:45-11 

lllllin 



Godfrey (cont'd! 

KelloKE Burnett 

11 11:15 



Plllebury Mllli 
in Ih 11:15-30 



Strike It Rlth 
Col fate 

in f dee moo! 
Eaty 



Valient Lady 

Wesson Oil 

NT I, 

Fitzgerald 

Love ol Life 
Amer Home Pr 
m f nee moo) 

BB-T 

Search for Teea'w 

PAO: Joyt 

m f (tee moo) 

BB-T 

Guiding Light 
PAO: lTory. dual 
m-f (tee mon) 
Compten 



Jack 

NT 



Paar Shew 
m-f L 



Love Story 

P&O: p roll. 

Ivory tnow 

m-f (tee mon) 

0F8 



No network 
programing 

BJ-f 



Robert O Lewie 

gut 

72NT Tj 

Va hr $3,150 

Art Llnkletter 
Kellogg: all pr 
52Hy Tj 

tilth 2:30-45 
Burn ett 
Plllahurv Mllla 

2:45 3 
2:45-3 V t hr 

Burnett $4000 



NBC's Matinee 

Theatre 

panic tpontors 

HT L 

COLOR 



Afternoon 

Film Festival 

st 1/16 



Big Payoff 
m-f 
NY ana rw.tfi 

sust 




DAY 



Network 
programing 
discontinued 



Date With 

Life 

Borden Co 

NT m w.f L 

YAB Va hr $2600 

Modern 

Romances 

Colgate 

B. Houston I 

Queen for A 
Day 

NT L 

Dlxiecup 
PAG 

Miles Labs 



Bob Crosby 

-M alt wka 

Carnation 

8:30-3:45 

Mies Labe 

Wade 

8:45-4 



Brighter Day 
PAG 

m-f dee mon) 

VAR 

The Secret Store) 

Afternoon Amer Home Pr» 

Film Festival NT m-f L 

st 1/16 B-B-T 

On Your Account 

(Win Elliott) 
PAO: tide, prell 

m-f 
Benton A Bewlee 






Plaky Lm 

Shew 

43Hy m-f L 

1 mln partle 

time A total 

partle $2,800 

Howdy Doody 
Standard Brands 
royal puddings 

gelatin 
T8NT 481 

Betea Va hr$2800 



Mickey Ma 

Club 
m-f 
TV Time Fooda 
R.R. 

Welch Grape Je 
DCSS 5:15-5:30 

Armour 
Laird 5:30-5:45 

Carnal loo 
Erwla Waaey 
»:4fi-« 

nt r 

per Va hr $2,800 



So oetwork 

orogramtng 

m-f 



Ding Deng 

10 10:30 
Manhattan Soap 
SBAW 

t.th 10-10 -it 
Colgate: Batea 
PAO: BBAT 

Va hr $1.608 

Ernie Kovacs 

Show 

NT L 



Home 

m-f 11-12 

NY LAF 

(see mon) 
Partle tpooaora : 
Wear -Ever Prods 
FA8 AR 

H J. Helm 
Ma* en 

Hllla Broa 
Ted Batea 

Peerleaa Elee: 
broil qu lk 
Zlewe Ca 

1 mln partle: 

time A tal $7000 



Ito network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

program brig 
m f 



Tennessee Ernie 

Ford Shew 
PAO: 12-12:15 
llv m-f L 
B&B 



Feather Yew 

Neat 

Colgate- Pelmollve 

alt d 12:30-45 
NT m-f L 
Eaty 



Ne network 

programing 



Garry Maori 

Lever Broa JWT 

Oen Motors 

10-10:15 
10:15-10 30 

Arthur Godfrey 
w 10:30-45 
Easywasher 

BBDO 

in BO 10:46 

BBDO 

Brlstl Myre.YAR 
m.w 10:45-11 

40Var L 

airaul Va hr I39B5 

Godfrey (cont'd) 
Lever: pepaodent 

m.w 11-11:15 
FCA.B 

I'lllsliury Mllla 

in ih 11:15 30 
Leo Burnett 



Strike It Rlah 

Colgate 

m-f 

I eee mon) 

Eaty 

Valiant Lady 
General Mllla 
m, w, f 
DF8. K-R 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

■-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



NBC't Matinee 

Theatre 

partle sponsors 

HY L 



Way ef trie 

World 

Borden Co 

NT m.w.f L 

YAR 

Modern 

Romances 

ColRato 

B. Houston 



Lave ef 


Life 


Amer Home Pr 


m-f (see 


mon) 


B-B-T 




Search for 


Tem'w 


PAO: 


Joyt 


m-f (aee 


mon) 


B-B-T 





Guiding Light 
PAG: Ivory, duit 

m-f (aee mon) 
Compten 



Jack 
NT 



Paar Stiew 

m-f L 



Love 8tory 

PAO: prell. 

Ivory snow 

m-f (aee mon) 



DF8 



Robert Q Lewie 
84NT Tj 



gnat 
\ hr $3000 



Afternoon 

Film Festival 

at 1/16 



Art llnkletter 

T^ver- anr* 
m w f 1:80-45 
BBDO 

Plllnhiirv Villa 
m-th J-46-8 
'•»• roorO 
Burnett 



Big Payer? 
fileafe 



Bob Creeby 

rtrncal Wl» 

t. t r 3-fs < 

liTT^- • 

Knmr- H hr 

\T '. hr $3 TOO 



Brlohtar Oav 

- f (are n"~ 

NT TAR 

Afternoon . — — ^. 

Film Festival rh « Secret Stena 
\m Home Prods: 
m-f (see mon) 
B-B-T 



1/16 



Queen for 
Day 
NT 



Pinky Lm 

841 a* 

H» m-f L 

Panic: Oen Fdj: 

Inst Jell-o 

YAR tu.w.f 

Howdy Doody 

Kellogg Co: 

rice kxisplest 

51NT 44L 

LB (see bell 

tu. th 5J0- 45 

Colgate: tthpit 

51NT 5:45-« >*l 

Batea Va hr $2800 



On Your Account 

'Win Elliott) 
PAG: tide, prell 

m-f 
NT 
Benton A Bewlea 



Mickey Mouse 
CI trb 
ra-f 
BBDO 

Vldu 5-5:lB 

Qen'l Mills 

m-w-f 

5:15-5:30 

5:45-6 
Knox Reeves, 
Esty 
Mattel 

alt with 
CarsceiHRobertg 
SOS 
MeC-E 5:30-5:45 

nt r 



No netwoTs 

progr amine 

m-f 




Network 
programing 



Ding Dong 

Sthoel 

10-10:30 

Wander Co: 

evaltlne 10:15-80 

Tatham-Lalrd 

Cl I. 

'/„ hr $1,800 



Ernie Kovacs 

Show 

NY L 



No net 
prograr 



No net 

pTOfTtU 

ml 



Heme 

in I 11-12 

NY l.Ar" 

i see mon A tu) 



1 mln panic: 
time A tal $7000 



Tennessee Ernie 

Ford Show 
Procter A Gamble 

13-12:15 
BAB 

Us m-f L No net 
prograi 



Feather Yeur 
Neat 

Colgate- Palmollve 

alt d 12 30 4t 

NY m-f L 



Eaty 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



a 
■ 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No ne' 
progra 



NBC'a Matlaae 

Theatre 

partle sponsors 

NT L 



After 
Film f 






Way ef the 




World 




Borden Co 




NT «.«.( L 




YAR 




Modern 




Romance 


Aftet 


Coleate 


Film 1 


R H ItOTJ 


st ] 



Queen for 
Day 
NT 



Pinky Lee 
Hy m-f Tj 

Panic: Gen Fds: 

Inst 'ell-o 
Johnsn A Johnsn 
YAR tu.w.f 

Howdy Ooooy 

ComlrwDtal Bkg: 

wonder bread. 

riostest caaes 

47NT 29L 

5^0-6 

••»hr: 
Sana* S2.SO0 



Mickey 

a c. 

A 
YT.rvR 
Campb 
Burnet" 
5:15-5 -3' 

Brls 
YAR 
NY 
per % I 



OGRAMS 



Daytime 9 January 1956 



work 
nlng 



ling 



work 

IllDB 

f 



work 

Ding 
t 



wert 
mlng 

f 



THURSDAY 



FRIDAY 



Garry Mnrt 
Scott Paper 
J W Thompson 
th 10 10 :16 
Chun King: JWT 
Tonl : Burnett 
alt th 10:15-30 
65-75NT L 

•A hr $3.140 
Arthur Godfrey 
Bristol Myers 
Y&R 

10:30-10:45 
Amer Home 
10:45-11 
BBT 



Network 
programing 
discontinued 



Godfrey (cont'd) 

Kellogg 

Burnett 

Plllibury Mills 
m-th 11:15-30 

Leo Burnett 

40V ar l> 

almul '/< hr $3995 



Strike It Rleh 

Colgate 
m-f dee mon) 
Esty 



Valiant Lady 

Tonl Co 

NT »• 

Weiss & Geller 

Love of Life 
Amer Home P 
m-f <»ee mon) 
B-B-T 

Search for Tom'w 

PAG: Joyt 

m-f <«ee mon) 

B-B-T 

Guiding Light 

PAG: Ivory, duat 
m-f (see mon) 

Compton 






Jaek Paar Shaw 
NT m-f fc 



Love Stery 

PAG: prell. 

ivory snow 

m-f (fee mon) 

DFS 



Robert Q Lewis 

Ralston Purina 

Co sit wks 

GBB 

2:15-2:30 

suit 
Va hr $3,150 

Art Llnkletter 
Keilneg: all W 
52Hy I. 

LB tu.th 2:8 0-45 
Plllsbury Mills 

m-th 2:45-3 
LB *i hr $4.IMK) 



Rio 



Payoff 
VT m-f I. 
• in tu.th 



noon 

estival Ben Cro , Dy 

/ 16 Tonl Co 

Weiss & Geller 
th 3:30-45 



ffcott Paper 
th 3:45- 
7»Hy 
J W 



er 



Brighter Day 
PAG 

™-' (see moo) 
Y&R 



noon 

"estival 
1/16 



The Seeret Storm 
Amer Home Prs 
m-f (see mon) 

B-B-T 



On Your Account 

twin Klllott) 
PAG: tide, prell 

m-f 
Benton & Bowie* 



No network 
Mouse programing 

Johnson 
Son 

5-5:15 
1 Soups 

). 5:45-6 
-Myers 
1:30-5:45 
P 
tr $2,800 



Ding Dong School 
Manhattan Soap 

8B&W 10-10:15 

Oerber Prodi 
D'Arey 10 15 30 
Ch m-f L 
•A hr $1,160 



Ernie Kovacs 

Show 

NT 1> 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Home 

m-f 11-12 

NT T.&F 

(see mon & tu) 



1-mln partlc: 
time & tal $7000 



Tennessee Ernie 

Ford Show 
Procter & Gamble 

12-12:15 leg 
Hy m-f L 
Benton t- Bowles 

— Feather Yaur 

Nest 

Colgate-Palmolive 

alt d 12:30 -45 

R. J. Reynolds: 

Winston elfs 
15 mln. 3 th in 4 
NT m-f L 
Eaty 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



NBC's Matinee 

Theatre 

partlc sponsors 

HT L 



Garry Moore 
Gen Mills DFS 

f 10-10: 15 
Lever Bros JWT 

f 1 0:15-1 0:30 

80S: MeC-E 

alt f 10:30-45 

CBS-Hytron 

B&N 10:30-45 

Converted ttlce 
Burnett 

Alt Wks 
Prudential C&H 

{ 10:45-11 
55-85NT L 

1/4 hr $3,140 



Garry Moors 

icont d) 

Tardley of Lndn 

Ayer f 11- 11:15 

Balston-Purina 

GBB alt wks 

Masland A&C 

11:15-30 L 

% hr $203 8 

Strike It Rich 

Colgate 

m-f 

<«Be intml 

Esty 

Valiant Lad> 

O...TR' Mills 

m, w, f 
DFS K H 



Love of 


Life 


Amer Hn 


me Pr 


(m ' >«*< 


mon> 


B-B-T 




Searrh for 


Tom'w 


PAD- 


ioyt 


m-f '«ee 


moo 


B-B-T 





Guiding LloM 
P&O: lvnrv. rl'ir* 

m-f (see morl 
Compton 



Jaek 

NT 



Paar Shew 
m-f !> 



Love Story 

PAG: prell. 

Ivory snow 

m-f (see mon) 



Robert Q Lewis 
Brown A Wmsn: 

viceroy — alt wk 
Bates 2-2:13 

2:15-2:30 sust 

40NT T, 

V4 hr $3,150 

Art Llnkletter 
T^ver: surf 

BBDO m.w.f 

Dole Pineannle 

Ayer 2:45-3 

64Hy t 

<4hr $40Ofl 



Big Payoff 

Colgate 
m.w.f 

dee mon) 



Afternoon s? sry 

Film Festival 

st 1/16 






Way of the 

World 

NT L 

Modern 
Romances 

Colgate 
B. Houston 



Queen for a 
Day 

NT L 



Afternoon 
Film Festival 

st 1/16 



Bob Crosby 

SOS: MeCann-E 

Oerber: D'Arey 

al t f 3:3 0-45 

General Mills 
41Hv 3:45-4 L 
Knox- H hr 

Reeves $3100 



Brighter Day 
P&G 

m-f (see mon) 

Y&R 

The Seeret Storm 
Am Home Prods: 
m-f (see mon) 
B-B-T 



On Your Account 

(Win Elliott) 
PAG: tide, prell 

m-f 
Benton & Bowie* 



Plaky Lee 
43Hy m-f L 
Partlc: Intl Shoe 
H.H&MeD th 



Howdy Doody 
Kellogg Co 
tu.th (see tu > 
Leo Burnett 

Standard Brandt 

Bate" •» 'Y 

V* hr **.«» Burnett 

NT » 

per K. or SUM 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 

Lettuce. Ine 

J. Cohan 
alt wks with 
Morton Salt 
NL&B 

m-f 

Gen'l Mills 

m-w-f 

5:15-5:30. 5:45-6 

Knox Reeves 

& Esty 

Mars Candy 

5:30-5:45 



The New 
Revue 

(colorcast) 



SATURDAY 



Network 
programing 
discontinued 



Blng Dong Sehool 
10-1030 

Colgate : Bate* 
alt f 10-10 :15 
timers] Mills: 

Tatham- Laird 

f 111:15-30 sag 
V* hr $1,160 



Hollywood 

Backstage 

Chas Antell 

m-w-f 
tu, th suit 
NT 



Honie 
m-f 11-12 

NY L&P 

(see moo A to) 



1-mtn partle: 
time A tal $7000 



Tennessee Ernl* 

Ford Show 
Procter A Gamble 

12-12:15 seg 
Hy m-f L 
Benton & Bowles 



Feather Yew 

Neat 

Colgate- Palmollve 

alt d 12:30-45 
NT m-f L 
Eaty 



No network 

programing 



No network 
programing 




Tales of 
Texas Rangers) 
General Mills 
Tathant- 

Lairrt tie.OOn 

alt wks 
Curtiss Candy 
C. L. Miller 



No network 
programing 



The Big Tea 
\.,i .,i.ni Dairy 
1 'r ... Is : sealtest 
ler cream, seal- 
t. ,< istry prods 
eOPhlla L 



• 14.000 



Lane Ranger 

General Mills: 

wheattes. kli 

51NT r 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 
programing 



DFS 



$18,000 



Capt Midnight 
Wander 
T. Laird 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 
programing 



Pacific Coast 

Conference 

Basketball 

2-3:45 

Amano 

Maury, Leo 

Marshall 



NBC's Matinee 

Theatre 
partlc sponsors 
Hy !• 



No network 

programing 



Big Ten 

Basketball 

sust 3-5 pm 



Way of the 

World 
Borden Co 
NT m.w.f 

Y&R 

Modern 

Romances 

Colgate 

B. Houston 



Queen for 
Day 
NT 



Pinky La* 
Hy m-f L 
Partic: Gen Frlj: 
Y&R tu.w.f 



Howdy Doody 

Luden'i 

Matt ies 5 :30-48 

Intl Sh: H.H&M* 

alt f 5:45 -6 
Wek* Grp Juice 
CSS alt f 5:45-8 
«N"v" 4*1 

K to tx.no 



No network 
programing 



Big Ten 

Basketball 

sust 3-5 pm 



No network 
programing 



No network 
programing 



Mr. Wiz; 
sust 



No netwo 
programlr 



No netwo 
program!! 



NBA Bask 

(cont'd) 



No netv< 
program! 




How 



nake your film programs 



produce 



m Wt* 



picture interest 



fw HEN your film programs have the simp"" and realism characteristic 
I "live" pick-ups, you have a client benefit that sells itself and pays 
<F handsomely. If you can achieve picture quality which will make it 
(fficult for a television viewer to know whether the program coming 
ito his home is "live" or "on film," you're in business! 

It's possible to do just this with good black and white films— simply 
F replacing outmoded equipment. 



tudio realism — 
ighest picture quality 

IpA's TK-21 Vidicon Film Camera is the 
i swer. This improved equipment offers 
i the dimension associated with rr live" 
jograms, provides studio realism and 
l^hest picture quality. It's so life-like, 
te viewer gets the impression that the 
| ow is being presented in the studio just 
f|r him! Thus, the spot advertiser is 
< ered the psychological advantage of 
r ive" programming at the low cost of 
fjn. Competitively, this is your bread- 
ad-butter business and its growth will 
i\ measured in direct proportion to 
\\ effectiveness. 



A check of some of the more technical 
advantages shows why the TK-21 Film 
Camera is a station's best investment for 
extra profits . . . 

"Live" picture 
sharpness 

The TK-21 is the only film system with 
enough signal output to use aperture 
correction to bring picture detail up to 
maximum sharpness (detail resolution 
100% at 350 lines) with a high signal 
to noise ratio. 

"Live" picture contrast 

The Vidicon tube is ideal for film repro- 
duction. It has unexcelled contrast range 




and assures realistic gray scale rendition 
over entire picture. This means you can 
get studio realism in your film pictures. 

Edge-lighting, shading 
eliminated 

The RCA Vidicon operates entirely with- 
out edge-lighting, electrical shading, or 
any other form of supplemental lighting. 
This camera virtually runs by itself. 
Used for finest quality reproduction of 
monochrome motion picture films or 
slides in a television system, the TK-21 
may be mounted directly to projectors 
or multiplexed. 

For complete information about the 
TK-21 Vidicon Film Camera, call your 
RCA Broadcast Sales Representative. 



As* 



the W 



ine« r 



^h« 



kn ©ws 




RADIO CORPORATION 
of AMERICA 

ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DIVISION -CAMDEN. N.J. 

In Canada: RCA VICTOR Company Limited, Montreal 








,. sv xv S X *\^ S: lnii 0< y e \ *k> 

Xx X x X,. '^ *' JQ& ss ^X^O^ 










BOSTON 





SPRINGFIELD 



-7k gca PLUS*- 



78 



SPONSOR 






■ 







vv \S *X >X N i 

% A v\ n"\ \\ I 





\ 



The excitement of New Year's 
Eve lasts all year long at WBZ+ 
| 1 WBZA! Especially in 1956, our 

35th anniversary year. 
J There's a gala array of popu- 

lar personalities, a sparkling 
line-up of varied programs, and always the imag- 
inative showmanship that make WBZ+WBZA 
an undisputed first in New England Radio. First 
in coverage. First in total audience. 

Join the celebration. Let WBZ+WBZA's 35th 
year bring excitement to you and your sales. 
Just call Bill Williamson, 
WBZ+WBZA Sales Man- 
ager at ALgonquin 4-5670 
—or Eldon Campbell, 
WBC National Sales Man- 
ager, at MUrray Hill 
7-0808, New York. 



w England's most powerful voice for 35 Happy New Years! 



E.TINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 



RADIO 
BOSTON — WBZ+WBZA 
PHILADELPHIA — KYW 
PITTSBURGH — KDKA 
FORT WAYNE — WOWO 
PORTLAND — K EX 



TELEVISION 
BOSTON— WBZ -TV 
PHILADELPHIA — WPTZ 
PITTSBURGH — KDKA-TV 
SAN FRANCISCO — KPIX 




KPIX REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 

All other WBC stations represented by Free a Peters. Inc. 



9 JANUARY 1956 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE WBC STATIONS 

79 




CERTAIN THINGS 
STAND OUT!! 

Yes, some things are all-important 
to the advertiser . . . 

like the dynamic sell-power of 
the JOE FLOYD Stations . . . 

the two-market impact you get 
for your one smart buy . . . 

the spending power of these big 
multiple markets. 
What a terrific spot for you! 
THE BIC TV COMBO 




78% of South Dakota, plus west- 
ern Minnesota, northwestern Iowa 

mm 

JOE FLOYD, President 

Evans Nord, Gen. Mgr. Larry Bentson, V.P. 
NBC PRIMARY 



... and Joe reports SELL-OUT of 
Saturday and Sunday time on NBC's 
MONITOR (KELO Radio). For 
future spot availabilities contact: 

H-R REPRESENTATIVES 




faiamor |ob holder liaber and Lucky striker Giselle Mackenzie rehearse selection 



agency profile 



Bernard Haber 

Head of film production 
BBDO, New York 



As head of BBDO's film production, Bernie Haber has one of the 
so-called "glamor agency jobs." 

"And I can tell you one thing," said he to SPONSOR. "You've got 
to love it to stay with it, because it's not unusual for you to be on 
the set at 8:00 a.m. and quit the next morning at 3:00 a.m. when 
there's a rush job to be done." 

Such rush jobs can concern one commercial costing anywhere from 
$2,000 to $22,000 or a whole series of film announcements amounting 
to some $50,000 or $60,000. 

There are some 10 producers who work under Haber and with 
the tv copy writing and art departments before storyboards are sent 
through to the account group and the client. 

"It's possible for the best tv copywriter or artist to imagine certain 
technical embellishments for a commercial which could either break 
the budget or ruin the sales pitch," Haber continued. "For example, 
a slow dolly might be called for, which, though artistically sound, 
would decimate the sales message because of the time it takes." 

Beyond such intra-agency advisory and technical responsibilities, 
the head of film production particularly deals with the recording 
studios, film studios, film labs which put the storyboard into execu- 
tion. On tough jobs, he's there himself, or when it's a question of a 
particular client. In normal cases ("Ain't no such animal") the 
producer assigned to the job handles minor emergencies. 

"One fascinating commercial to work on is the Lucky Strike film," 
Haber told sponsor. "In one minute of film (90 feet of film) or 
1,440 frames, there can be virtually all separate shots when you're 
doing stop-motion work as in our walking and dancing cigarettes." 

He explained how each shot must be individually set up, with 
cigarettes hanging from invisible nylon threads, others standing 
with cork tipped needles keeping them upright. 

"You might say my wife's a film widow," he added, showing one 
of the many pictures he's taken of her and his two-year-old son. 
Haber's office, incidentally, is virtually papered with various artistic 
photographs from scenery to action to portraiture. 

"I was a camera ham when I was 10. My son's got a camera 
already," he added. * * * 

For story on Lucky Strike film commercial. See page 36 



80 



SPONSOR 



portrait of a market 



. . . where these factors combine for your sales' success 



. . . a proven high-income industrial 
area . . . 




... a proven year-round vaca 
tionland . . . 




. . . where, with outstanding local 
and network productions, one sta- 
tion brings dreams to life for 
446,200 television families. 



Serving Albany, Troy, Schenectady, N. Y. and 30 counties of New York and New England 



WRGB 



A General Electric Television Station * Represented Nationally by l>Bcl SPOT SALES 



9 JANUARY 1956 



81 




a forum on question* of current interest 
to air advertisers and their agencies 



What iron Iff you most like to know about 
British commercial television 






ANSWER-SEEKING QUESTIONS 




Frank J. Gilday, Manager, radio-tv dept. 
McCann-Erickson 



# The first question that conies to 
mind in this connection relates to the 
progress or lack of progress of British 
Commercial Television as compared to 
the non-commercial government-spon- 
sored television. Specifically, is there 
any rating experience or record of 
similar measurements which indicate 
whether or not the British viewing 
public prefers one as opposed to the 
other? Do these ratings indicate any- 
thing with respect to whether or not 
commercials which have as their pur- 
pose promoting the sale of specific 
products encourage or deter people 
from tuning in on a given program? 

Is there any noticeable difference in 
either the type or the quality of the 
programs or programs sponsored com- 
mercially in Great Britain as compared 
to the programs on the BBC? And, if 
so, what are these differences? What 
types of programs are preferred by the 
viewing public in Great Britain? In 
what respects do their most popular 
programs differ from ours? Do Brit- 
ish viewers appear to like or dislike 
American tv programs currently being 
broadcast in their country? Is there 
any evidence the American-produced 
programs are held in greater favor on 



the average than British-produced pro- 
grams? 

Finally, is there a noticeable differ- 
ence one way or the other of the Brit- 
ish public's choice of live versus filmed 
programs? 

With respect to commercials, is there 
enough experience to indicate relative 
effectiveness in live commercials as 
contrasted with filmed commercials? 

Is there an extensive use of anima- 
tion in commercials and how is this 
compared with the amount of anima- 
tion emploxed in commercials in this 
country? Are British commercials 
longer, shorter or substantially of simi- 
lar length to ours? 

ENGLAND: EUROPEAN PACESETTER 




George Mathisen, Coordinator of Radio, 

Cinema and Television 

Colgate-Palmolive International, N. J. 

• Our interests in the present and 
future developments of British com- 
mercial television are two-fold. First- 
ly, for our own company in England, 
and second, for the remaining coun- 
tries in Europe where we have com- 
panies, since we feel that ultimately 
television throughout Europe will be 
patterned on England's format. There- 
fore, we hope for eventual changes in 
England's over-all system. 

The radio Luxembourg people have 



for some time discussed establishing a 
commercial television station with a 
coverage area including London and 
southern England. Since radio Luxem- 
bourg's commercial radio design is 
more closely akin to our "'sponsored ' 
radio we might expect their television 
to follow similar commercial lines. 
This, of course, would be an excellent 
opportunity to present a more realistic 
version of sponsored television to the 
ITA and to the British viewers on 
their own sets. Two questions arise at 
this point and they are, No. 1, What 
are radio Luxembourg's plans for tele- 
vision?, and No. 2. If radio Luxem- 
bourg establishes a third or fourth 
channel is there any likelihood that 
Luxembourg's television system might 
influence the ITA to alter their pres- 
ent modus operandi? 

We have already noted many simi- 
larties in program appeals and effec- 
tive commercial techniques between 
England and the United States. Schwer- 
in in England turned up data after just 
the first few weeks to substantiate the 
American "direct approach" in televi- 
sion commercials — this despite the fact 
that many British producers predicted 
audiences in England would have to be 
"sneaked up on." We would be inter- 
ested in knowing what further infor- 
mation has been compiled on program 
preferences and what effect, if am. 
ITA results have had on BBC pro- 
graming and production. And for 
commercials, it seems to me the ques- 
tions are those that we are striving to 
answer her in the states. 

Got any more questions? 

SPONSOR will soon have a 
representative in Great 
Britain to revieic the com- 
mercial tv situation. If you 
have any questions not 
posed above, send them to 
Editor, SPONSOR, 40 E. 
49th St., JSew York 1 7, IS. Y. 



82 



SPONSOR 



Audience composition data and set 
ownership figures will be necessary 
for the evaluation of large expendi- 
tures. However, until set conversion 
reaches near saturation these will be 
short-lived statistics to say the least. 
More important for the future is the 
development of a system which will 
permit maximum effective utilization 
of all this knowledge we hope to ob- 
tain. What value has last night's rat- 
ing w hen next week s commercial may 
be telecast two hours later? Often we 
do not even know for sure what the 
competition on BBC will be. let alone 
the program on the ITA on which our 
commercial will appear. Knowledge of 
the most effective commercial presen- 
tation techniques is heavily diluted by 
our inability to plan association and 
smooth integration with the vehicle 
which will carry the spot. 

We are all very happy just to have 
the facilities of this wonderful medium, 
and England has made a tremendous 
stride in getting it started, but soon 
they will be ready for step two and we 
wonder what is being knocked about 
that smacks of change. 

ENTERTAINMENT SELLS ANYWHERE 




Theodore J. Grunewald 

Director of tv & rail in 

Hicks & Greist 



• Barring Roger Bannister, the 
I nited States is a faster-paced countr) 
than Great Britain. Americans are ac- 
customed to being offered a product or 
sen ice on a rush basis and making a 
quick decision on it. A single tv com- 
mercial offering a new product can 
often draw a huge response, particu- 
lar!) among children, because the 
viewer sees what he wants and goes 
out to bu\ it. Such things do not nor- 
mal!) occur among our more reserved 
British cousins. I don't think anyone 
I Please turn to page 95) 




9 JANUARY 1956 



83 



^m!h^ & -Happy Nw \\omA\mAj\ 





4.0 



THIS CHART IS BASED ON NIELSEN STATION INDEX AM-RADIO REPORT 

Los Angeles Area DECEMBER 1954 and NOVEMBER 1955 

N S I Area Audience 
6 A.M. to 6 P.M. Monday thru Friday 




/KFIA/B (los angeles) . # # Tops of the top independents^ 
in Southern California . . . 



More Information from our National Representatives 



TgS0% 




The Branham Company 

New York • Chicago 
— in San Francisco: 
McGavren-Quinn Company 



84 



Harry Maizlish- President — Gen. AAgr. 
Mort Sidley- Gen. Sales AAgr. 

SPONSOR 



- 



Continued 

from 

page 10 





sounder way of judging performance, especially in a co- 
sponsored show (and where a cross-plug is concerned). 

Even when a program is the sole property of a single ad- 
vertiser, each brand manager must look to the Average Audi- 
ence to tell him how he is spending his dollars for this is the 
audience which his product is talking to — not to the total 
audience of the entire show. Some of these slide-rule boys 
were well aware of this, before the new Nielsen layout, to be 
sure. But perhaps others weren't. 

So in answer to whether the hour is running the half-hour 
out of business, I'd say absolutely not. It could be that the 
networks will continue to exert pressure to sell 60-minute 
stanzas (as they did last year). But I think the Nielsen num- 
bers game has deflated their attack. 

On the other hand, let's not undersell an hour of tv time 
for there are many things which it offers that are impossible 
in half that amount of time. 

For example, how many products must support the show — 
how many want tv exposure? If it's more than three, you 
can use the additional commercial time for sure. Or does 
your copy story require long commercials? Or does the 
parent company want a main title that really gives a pic- 
ture of corporate activities (a long lead-in, a catalogue of 
products, etc.)? 

As for the editorial scope of hour versus half, naturally 
more can be done in the longer version. This doesn't matter 
in some formats. But with drama, another 29 minutes can be 
a big help. You can tackle stories that really unfold and 
develop. You can "get inside" the characters you present. 
You can build your interest honestly and resolve your plots. 

And let's not forget the question of money (which in tele- 
vision would be suicidal). An alternate hour is bound to be 
cheaper than a weekly half hour even though you double your 
talent costs (usually not necessary) to provide the hour's 
entertainment. This is, of course, due to the fact that a half 
hour of time costs 60 per cent of the hourly rate. And with a 
cross-plug on the intervening weeks an advertiser still can 
maintain weekly exposure. So, I tried not to hedge the ques- 
tion as it was put to me on the Coast but to give both sides, 
as I saw them, because I honestly do believe that each has its 
merits and there ought to be a peaceful coexistence in the 
year ahead. 



• • • 



Letters to Bob Foreman are welcomed 

Do you always agree with the opinions Bob Foreman ex- 
presses in "Agency Ad Libs?" Bob and the editors of SPONSOR 
would be happy to receive and print comments from readers. 
Address Bob Foreman, c/o sponsor, 40 E. 49 St., New York. 



9 JANUARY 1956 




MAURY FARRELL 

Star of 

TIME TO RISE 

WAPI 6:45 to 9:00 am Mon.-Fri. 
NOON EDITION 

WABT 12 to 12:30 Mon.-Fri. 

Maury Farrell has long been a favorite, 
having been on WAPI for 20 years. 
He is widely accepted as Birmingham's 
best known radio personality. "Time 
to Rise" is also a favorite to get up 
by, loaded as it is with cheerful music, 
news, weather and time signals. Maury 
has been with WABT since the station 's 
beginning in 1949. " Noon Edition" 
finds him in top form. 

Stars Sell on 
Alabama's 

greatest RADIO station 




Birmingham 

Represented by John Blair & Co. 
Southeast, Harry Cumminqs 

greatest TV station 




Birmingham 

Represented by BLAIR-TV 



85 




Dallas radio stations promote 

All seven of the Dallas radio sta- 
tions joined forces to promote the ra- 
dio medium for nine months during 
the coming year. The promotion will 
be based on three themes: "Listen 
While You Work," "Listen While You 
Drive" and "Listen While You Re- 
lax." The joint campaign, developed 
from a Texas Association of Broad- 
casters' presentation for radio promo- 
tion in the state for 1956, will utilize 
posters, large newspaper ads in both 
city papers, radio announcements and 
auxiliary promotional materials like 



nine-month media push 

humper strips, counter cards, mail stuf- 
fers, stationery stickers and postage 
meter imprints. 

The stations, KGKO, KIXL, KLIF. 
KRLD, KSK'Y, WFAA and WRR, will 
use the services of McCann-Erickson, 
planners of TABs statewide presenta- 
tion. Although there have been many 
all-station pitches to clients before, the 
promoters believe that this is the first 
time that all of the radio stations in a 
market have joined forces to promote 
their own media through an integrated 
campaign of this type. -k k -k 



Ad agencies in New Orleans, Denver move to casual setting 




Relaxed atmosphere prevails in New Orleans Creole setting (I.) and modern Denver agency 



A trend toward more comfortable 
and pleasant surroundings seems to be 
shaping up among agencies in as wide- 
ly scattered places as Denver and New 
Orleans. The Galen E. Broyles Co. of 
Denver recently moved into its new 
two-story building in downtown Den- 
ver, while the Aubrey Williams Adver- 
tising Agency has taken over three old 
Creole houses in the Vieux Carre (old 
quarter) of New Orleans. 

Though there is a seeming differ- 
ence in their decor and period, both 
agencies stress the relaxed atmosphere 
they believe more conducive to higher 
efficiency without strain. The Denver 
agency feels that it has solved two of 
the problems besetting other agencies: 
space and location. Its new quarters 
were specifically designed to allow 
adequate storage facilities for old art 
and plates as well as liberal office space 



86 



to afford enough privacy to everyone. 
The location, near Delivers Cherry 
Center is convenient, without traffic or 
commutation problems. 

The quiet setting of the New Or- 
leans agency makes for less tension 
than is generally found on Madison 
Avenue, without sacrificing accessibil- 
ity to important agency functions. The 
three old Creole houses taken over by 
the agency were renovated to provide 
the maximum in comfort and space 
and still retain the quiet, peaceful atti- 
tude for which the locale is famous. 
A patio is utilized for serving refresh- 
ments and doing some work out of 
doors, and the New Orleans climate is 
usually warm enough to make use of 
this feature throughout the year, an 
added benefit to employe relations. 

• • • 



Sponsor, star of tv show, 
pulls heavy mail response 

Being a celebrity in his own right, 
ex-football star Bobby Grayson de- 
cided to do his own show on KLOR, 
Portland, Ore., for his White Rock 
Bottling Co. Just prior to the profes- 
sional football game every Sunday, 
Grayson appeared conducting an in- 




Grayson doubles es both sponsor and star 

terview with visiting stars and telling 
stories of famous sports greats. 

Viewers were given a chance to iden- 
tify a famous sports figure through 
clues given on the show. The first 20 
correct answers received free foot- 
balls, and about 1,000 entries come in 
after each show. In addition to the ex- 
cellent mail pull the show also sold a 
great many football fans on the idea 
of using White Rock soda. -k -k -k 

Right Motors Sales finds 
radio is right ad medium 

In just six months, Right Motors 
Sales jumped from an average used 
car dealer to the top, with the largest 
used car volume in Cleveland. The 
gimmick used to promote the added 
sales was one that proved fair in print 
but was sensational on WJW. The 
gimmick: $5 down and $5 a week on 
all 1949-1952 cars with a top price of 
$395. 

I Please turn to page 1021 




WJW a/e Will Dougherty (I), Right salesman 

SPONSOR 







9 JANUARY 1956 



87 



There's 9 



•••••• 



• • _••• 



••• ••• ••• 



(T 



• • •••• •• • • 

"QUESTION-'' 

w Here's a 

Q Answer!. 

. . TO YOUR SOUTH TEXAS 
SALES POTENTIAL . . . 





Monday thru Friday at 3:45 p.m. 

is designed to reach military and 

civilian personnel leaving 

• FORT SAM HOUSTON 

• RANDOLPH FIELD 

• LACKLAND AFB 

• KELLY AFB 

of these 



65% 



90,000 people 

do their shopping on the way home! 

(BASED ON SURVEY MADE BY KELLY AIR FORCE 
BASE FOR AIL MILITARY INSTALLATIONS) 



(5 



KTSA PACKAGE RATE 
BUMPER TO BUMPER 



• 10 spots per week $115.00 

• 15 spots per week $155.00 

• OPEN RATE DISCOUNTS AS EARNED 



CALL 



CHARLES LUTZ 

General Manager Sta. KTSA 
San Antonio, Texas 

iCA 7-1251 COLLECT 

] Contact PAUL H. RAYMER CO. 





Continued 

from 

page 24 



Insiders, however, were aware that the club's theme actu- 
ally was substantially similar to the Rat Pack's, i.e., let's get 
ours, we don't care for anybody else. I take a back seat to 
no one in the sense of humor area, and I have been around 
long enough to be fully aware that many facets of showbusi- 
ness, as any business, demand a tough, cynical approach. 

This is particularly true in the case of performers who hit 
the popularity peaks. Not so long ago I was cutting up jack- 
pots with Eddie Fisher. I've known Eddie quite a while, knew 
him (to make the point) when he was a hopeful kid, strug- 
gling for his break. At a Coke rehearsal, some six years and 
several million dollars later, Eddie said: "Gosh, it's hard to 
know who to believe any more." 

I tried to explain to Eddie that anytime a human being, in 
his own person, became a multi-million dollar enterprise 
there would necessarily follow a full attachment of anglers, 
chiselers, finaglers and phony friends. All he could do, I tried 
to explain, was to try to evaluate and separate the few peo- 
ple whom he felt to be real friends, from the many who come 
up out of the ground only when the bright light of stardom 
shines on a kid. Most important of all, I attempted to caution 
Eddie, was the need for him to avoid bitterness and cynicism. 

All this, I realize, makes me sound insufferably holier- 
than-thou. Which I mean not at all to do. There are a sub- 
stantial number of people in showbusiness, performers and 
administrators, who have rassled with the roughest of the 
rough ones; who have come through the most viciously ma- 
nipulated deals over and over again, and who, withal, have 
managed to remain whole and nice people. 

Collier's magazine, in its first January issue, has a fine 
piece on a man who managed it, Perry Como. The piece is 
entitled, appropriately enough, "Nice Guys Finish First." I 
know enough of Perry's background and career to be able to 
take the stand to the effect that a number of people along the 
way have given Mr. C. some very fancy goings-over. I 
wouldn't claim that the raw routines didn't have some effect 
on Perry. They did. He is considerably more cautious than 
he was years ago. It takes him a long, long time to become 
convinced that a person is a right guy. But there's a big gap 
between such care and conservatism in estimating people and 
situations, and becoming bitter and cynical over what is, was 
and always will be plain, ordinary human nature. 

I am not propagandizing toward the objective of having 
everyone in showbusiness accept the idea that a man who 
calls you "sweetheart" or "buddy" is deeply, truly fond of 
you. Nor am I preaching the "turn the other cheek" bit. 
I am merely making the point that it is possible, and has been 
proven so, to deal with the cynics and the bitter ones, to com- 
pete with the vicious and the cruel ones without signing up 
with the society. 



• •• 



88 



SPONSOR 



FILM COMMERCIAL 

(Continued from page 39) 

*2. pre-production 



7 July Berenberg assigns one of 
Screen Gems' staff producer-directors 
to the job. On the same day the 
producer-director picks his staff and 
crew from those available among the 
Screen Gems' personnel and from free- 
lance sources. He turns scripts and 
story-board copies over to the various 
department heads concerned with pre- 
production. These include: 

The production manager for break- 
down into shooting schedule. 

The construction department to 
make a list of sets needed. (From 
here they go to the art department for 
set design and sketches, which must 
in turn be okayed by Berenberg and 
.he agency.) 

The property department for lists 
of props to be rented, purchased, 
made. 

The wardrobe department for break- 
down of wardrobe to be furnished by 
the studio for productions. 

15 July While pre-production work 
is still going on at the producer's, 
Raymond Scott in the course of a six- 
hour recording session with Dorothy 
Collins, his orchestra and the vocal 
group makes tapes for the total of 
eight commercials. A client executive 
sits in the control booth to okay each 
take and thus eliminate costly retakes 
which might occur at a later date. 

16 July The producer has picked a 
cast for the commercials and presents 
his ideas to Berenberg and Haber. 
They agree in principle but upon dis- 
cussion with Traviesas, it is decided 
to do screen tests on four of the actors 
chosen and to wait until two of the 
costumes are ready so that these tests 
can be used simultaneously as ward- 
robs tests, thus minimizing expenses. 

21 July Two of the sets are com- 
pleted. A cameraman and gaffer 
(head electrician) with his crew are 
called in to rig (place) the lights for 
the tests and check all circuits. 

22 July 7:30 a.m., make-up call. 
The day is spent on the set, making 
tests. Walk in, walk out, turn toward 
camera, smile, take a cigarette, light 
up, smoke, look as if you enjoyed it, 



smile, walk back and forth, etc. (The 
cost of these tests, including the one- 
day pay to the performers, is separate 
and above the amount agreed upon by 
Screen Gems and BBDO.) 

5:30 p.m. Shooting completed, the 
assistant cameraman sends the film to 
the lab for developing and printing. 

23 July 2 p.m. Haber, Berenberg, 
the producer-director, Traviesas and 
Tax Cumings sit in the projection 
room and look at the silent tests of 
the actors. One is rejected as looking 



as if he didn't know how to smoke. 
The tests of the other three are sent 
to the client's ad department for okay. 

26 July Everything is ready. The 
sets are built, the wardrobe is fitted, 
the rigging crew has completed setting 
the lights, a complete crew consisting 
of assistant director, cameraman and 
assistant, gaffer and electricians, prop 
man, grip, stand-by, painter, film edi- 
tor and assistant and dozens of other 
major and minor technicians have re- 
ceived their call to actual production. 



Seen in the 
best circles .. 




and circling the 
20th ranking market 
in retail sales 
per household. 

Tulsa Broadcasting Company 
P. 0. Box 9697 — Tulsa, Okla. 
Ben Holmes, National Sales Manager 
Avery-Knodel, Inc., National Representative 



Serving Eastern Oklahoma from 
Muskogee and Tulsa 




\ CJiannjel 



9 JANUARY 1956 



89 



./. production 



27 July 6.30 a.m. make-up call. 7:30 
a.m. wardrobe and crew call. 8:30 
a.m. start to roll. 9:00 a.m. Only a half 
hour behind schedule the director 
starts tbe actors on a walk-through of 
the first scene to be shot, while camera- 
man and gaffer make some last-minute 
adjustments on the lights. The sound- 
man calls for a line of dialogue, in or- 
der to be able to determine his level. 

9:38 a.m. The familiar words, al- 
ways heartening to a cost-conscious 
production manager, are heard in the 
peculiar atmosphere of the sound 
stage: 

"Quiet on the set!" 

"Roll it!" 



"Speed!" 

"Action!" 

Everyone but the on-camera actors 
have frozen into a tableau of sus- 
pended animatiofn — the director from 
hi scanvas chair, the cameraman from 
his perch on the camera dolly, the 
sound man from his place at the mix- 
ing panel and Bernie Haber from the 
dim sidelines, watch the scene take on 
movement and shape. 

"Cut!" 

Triggered by the directors com- 
mand, the camera and sound man cut 
their film (stop the motors in their 
respective apparatus ) ; the grip starts 
chasing after a fly with a Flit-gun; 
the make-up man and hairdresser con- 
verge on the actors to remove a drop 



of perspiration and run a comb in- 
effectually through the perfectly coiffed 
hair; the assistant cameraman marks 
the exposed footage on a long and the 
cameraman turns to the director for 
instructions for the next set-up (cam- 
era-position) . 

"There's a noisy one somewhere, 
Jack!" This sentence by the sound 
man. directed toward the gaffer, 
means that one of the lights has a 
faulty bulb which sings. The director 
has heard it and is worried. 

"Bad?" asks the director. 

"No. It's less than one d.b. (decible) 
but it could get worse," says the sound 
man. 

"Let's do another for protection 
anyway." 




f. New stations on air* 



CITY & STATE 



CALL 
LETTERS 



CHANNF 
NO. 



ON-AIR 
DATE 



ERP (kw)« 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)*" 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



STNS. 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKET* 

1 000) 



PERMITEE. MANAGER, Rl 



HASTINGS, NEB. 
ODESSA, TEX. 



KHAS-TV 
KOSA-TV 



23 Dec. 
20 Dec. 



100 
102 



730 
740 



NBC 



None 
None 



kJCA Nebraska lv Corp. 

'^ r " Fred A. Scaton. pres. 

mca Odessa Tv Co. 

" r " C. L. Trigg, pres. 

Cecil Mills, v.p. 



ff. New construction permits* 



CITY & STATE 



CALL 
LETTERS 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



DATE OF GRANT 



ERP (kw)** 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)*" 



STATIONS 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKET* 

(000) 



PERMITEE. MANAGER, RADIO fl 



MADISON, WISC. 



7 Dec. 



100 



795 



WKOW-TV 
WMTV 



125 



Radio Wisconsin, Inc. 
Ralph M. Imrrull. pres. 
Russell A. Nelson, v.p. 



Iff. New applications 



CITY 4 STATE 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



DATE 
FILED 



ERP (kw)« 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)*** 



ESTIMATED 

COS! 



ESTIMATED 

1ST YEAR 
OP. EXPENSE 



TV STATIONS 
IN MARKET 



APPLICANT, AM AFFILIAT 



SACRAMENTO, CAL. 



HAGAMAN, N. Y.- 



46 



29 



17 Dec. 



24 Dec. 



19.06 



247 



279 $105,016 $180,000 



KBET-TV 
KCCC-TV 
KCRA-TV 



696 $108,200 $49,500 None 



Capitol Radio Enterprises! 
Irving J. Schwartz, gen. mgr. 
Wm. S. George, sis. mgr. 
John Matranga, prog. mgr. 



Hudson Valley Bcstg. Co., Inc. 
Dr. John J. Quintan, pres. 



BOX SCORE 



V. S. stations or air... 



123 § 



Markets covered 



260 



'Both new c.p 'a and nations going on the air listed here are those which occurred between 
28 November and 9 Detembei or on which information could be obtained in that period. Stations 
are considered to be on the air when commercial operation starts. "Effective radiated power. 
Aural power usually Is one-half the visual power. ***Antenna height above average terrain (not 
abf»ve prounaj. Tlnfoi luaiion on the number of sets in markets where not designated as belni 



from NBC Research, consists of estimates from the stations or reps and must be deemed II • 
mate. sData from NBC Research and Planning. NFA! No figures available it Pri* 
on sets in market. 3 Each of the three station executives listed owns 1/3 interest in Capil 
Enterprises. -Allocatd to Gloversville, N. Y., station would be satellite of WROW-TV, 
N. Y. 



90 



SPONSOR 



Though the sound man feels that 
the offending bulb did not interfere 
with the scene, the director wants an- 
other take, in order to play safe. But 
before they roll again the bad light 
is located and a brand-new bulb sub- 
stituted for the humming globe. 

The shooting of the commercials 
1 involves silent scenes with actors 
'shown lighting up cigarettes, to be 
fitted to the pre-recorded music. These 
must be shot in various lengths, to 
fit the different versions of each sub- 
ject. It also involves sync-souno shoot- 
ing of the announcer, who appears on 
the end of most of the commercials to 
give the actual pitch. 

2 August 6:30 p.m. After six days 
I not counting one Sunday) of shoot- 
ing, the last of the film goes to the 
lab. 

In the meantime the necessary art 
work has been completed by the title- 
department and has been photo- 
graphed and sent to the lab. 

Also each day the developed and 
printed footage has been delivered to 
the film-editor, who has put it to- 
gether in sequence and has svnchron- 
ized the soundtrack. 



/. finishing 



3 August 3:30 p.m. The producer- 
director, the film editor, Berenberg 
and Haber assemble in the projection 
room and screen all of the film. Here 
suggestions are made as to how and 
where to cut the scenes. (If any re- 
takes are necessary, they can be de- 
cided upon at this point.) 

23 August The editor has com- 
pleted the rough-cut in co-operation 
with the producer-director. He spent 
many hours with Bernie Haber look- 
ing over his shoulder while he worked 
at the Moviela (film editing machine). 
The same day, 2:30 p.m. the rough 
cut is screened for the group, who 
looked at the original footage. Most 
of the scenes are okayed as is, but 
some changes are suggested. ( This 
screening takes place at Movielab, 
which has been handling the labora- 
tory work, because here it is possible 
to play back the various sound tracks 
— dialogue, narration, music, sound- 
effects — in sync with the picture and 
thus give an impression of what the 
finished film will be like.) 



27 August 2 p.m. A dubbing ses- 
sion has been arranged at Reeves 
Sound Recording Studios and the edi- 
tor has brought the final work-print 
(picture) and work-tracks I dialogue, 
narration, music, sound-effects, loops) 
which are now being screened and 
re-recorded onto one final sound track. 
Present are the film-editor and his 
assistant, Haber, the producer-dim toi 
and the sound mixer and crew from 
the recording studio. Each commer- 
cial necessitates two or three rehear— 
als and from one to four take-. 

The assistant editor has meanwhile 
ordered the opticals ( fades, dissolves, 
flop-overs, trick shots) from one of 
the independent optical companies. 
Here the sections of the original nega- 
tive, which are involved in these opti- 
cals are printed, rephotographed to 
incorporate the desired effects and a 
new negative is delivered to the 
producer for his inspection. 

The same day 6:30 p.m. The dub- 
bing session completed, the editor 
takes the work print and tracks back 
to his cutting room, while the new 
sound-track is being developed. 



FIRST 




IN ARKANSAS 



if First in Coverage! 

More families live and enjoy television in KATVIand than 
in the area served by any other Arkansas television station 
. . . either present or proposed! 

if First in Family Acceptance! 

There's something especially designed for every member of 
the family every day on KATV. Of course, most programs on 
KATV appeal to the entire family . . . the schedule is care- 
fully planned that way! 

* First in Facilities! 

Two complete studios, one in Little Rock and one in Pine 
Bluff, employing more personnel and equipment . . . which 
means better programs and better reception from KATV! 

if First in Advertisers! 

More advertisers . . . local, regional and national . . . are 
active on KATV than on any other station. The reason is 
obvious . . . KATV PRODUCES RESULTS! 



KATV 



CHANNEL 7 

Studios in Little Rock & Pine Bluff 

Avery-Knodel, Inc. — National Representatives 

John H. Fugate — Genera/ Manager 

620 Beech Street — Little Rock, Arkansas 



9 JANUARY 1956 



91 



28 August The work print and 
original negative as well as the new 
sound negative are turned over to the 
negative cutter for matching (cutting 
negative to match the work print). 
The developed sound negative is re- 
ceived from the lab, synchronized with 
the work-sound so that it can late be 
synchronized with the cut picture nega- 
tive. 

29 August The cut negative, matched 
to the work-print and carefully spliced, 
along with the sound negative is sent 
to the lab for a first answer print. 



30 August The first answer print is 
received from the lab and screened 
by the film editor for a first check, 
then by the producer-director and 
Berenberg, for a final check before 
presentation to the agency. 

The same day at 3 p.m., the print 
is turned over to Bernie Haber, who 
screens it with Travie Traviesas and 
Tax Cumings as well as Whit Hobbs 
and his crowd of writers, before it is 
taken to the client. 

7 September After a long weekend, 
a screening is set up for the full ad- 





now. 



Ector 
Midland 
Winkler 

Ward 

Crane 

Upton 

Martin 
Andrews 
Dawson 

Gaines 
Howard 

Reeves 

Pecos 

Reagan 

Glasscock 

Crockett 

Lea (N. Mex.) 



Television at its 

finest in the richest 
market in Texas . . . ! 




Here's pulling power in a market where per-family 
effective buying incomes exceed the national average by 
$1,187.00 each year*. A CBS-TV primary affiliate, KOSA-TV 
offers adjacencies with top-rated shows beamed at the high- 
income working class in and around Texas' fastest-growing city. 
It's the heart of the nation's biggest oilfield. 

Write or wire today for full details including rates 
ard availabilities. 

K0SA*TV 

Channel 7 • Odessa, Texas 



♦KOSA-TV coverage per-family effective buying income: 
National average per-family effective buying income: 

Safes Management Report, May 10, 1955 



$6,461.00 
5,274.00 

1,187.00 



vertising department at American To- 
bacco and as often happens, some 
afterthoughts bring suggestions, which 
appear minor on the surface, but 
which at this stage of the game would 
necessitate considerable expenditures: 

"Too bad that's a cut. Seems to me 
a dissolve would be smoother right 
here. Don't you think so?" 

No, Tax doesn't think so. 

"Well, but we could put one in, 
couldn't we?" 

"It'd cost money." 

"One dissolve, what can it amount 
to? A couple of bucks?" 

"About $300 — if it can be done at 
all." 

The figure seems out of line and 
they get Bernie Haber on the phone 
to explain. Says Haber: 

"First of all, it can only be done if 
there are other good takes of the 
scenes in question, as the negative for 
these scenes has already been cut and 
can no longer be used for an optical. 
If these extra takes exist, the editor 
must dig them out, match them into 
the picture, send the negatives to the 
lab to have fine-grains made. Then 
the fine-grains go to the optical house, 
which shoots the dissolve and after 
a day or so delivers a new negative. 
This new negative, now containing 
the dissolve, must be cut into the over- 
all negative and the lab must re-time 
the negative for perfect print-quality 
and make a new print. 

"The entire operation will take four 
to five days if we're lucky and the 
charges, including editing time and 
facilities, will certainly run over 
$300." 

The idea is dropped. 

After this interlude everybody 
agrees that the commercials are good 
and a final screening is arranged, at 
which Paul Hahn will see the end- 
result. 

Late that same day, a phone call 
from American Tobacco gives BBDO 
the final okay and Screen Gems is 
given the order for the number of re- 
lease-prints in both 35mm and 16mm, 
which must be ordered from the lab. 

8 September The print order is re- 
ceived by the lab and the job is vir- 
tually completed. Thus, it is obvious 
that in order to put the light into 
"light-up time," many zeros are added 
to the dollar signs which develop 
through the months of perfecting a 
tv commercial. * * * 



92 



SPONSOR 



AD LIB SELLING 

[Continued from page 35 I 

corded sound effect of a heating heart. 
This was to open and close all Del 
\\ ebb radio commercials. 

4. Station air salesmen were per- 
sonally conducted through the original 
model home, and shown the fancy 
kitchen unit. (Commented one of 
them later: "What a gadget. I 
flipped!") 

5. n he campaign rolled last June 
with a barrage of teasers built around 
the heartbeat sound effect, and the 
'|uestion "Where is the Heart of a 
Home?" 

6. Audiences soon got the answer. 
The selling switched to "The Heart of 
a Home is in the Home with a Heart — 
Hel Webb's Camelback Village." The 
selling carried that ring of conviction 
that comes when the salesmen are gen- 
uinely excited about the merchandise. 
riot just giving copy a slick reading. 

Home Sweet Home: Phoenix-area 
listeners crowded out to Camelback 
\ illage as the campaign rolled along, 
lollowing heart-shaped road signs that 
again carried out the campaign theme. 

They came, the) saw. and they 
bought. At least one sale per day was 
chalked up b\ Breen and his staff. 

In September, the builders revised 
J and enlarged the plans for the ■"Hume 

*•*••*•• 
f Anything less lhaii free access to 
prime time for the regional and local 
advertiser relegates them to second class 
citizenship in the television medium. 
They will end up in steerage with the 
first class cabins reserved for large 
advertisers only." 

ROBERT BRECKNER 

V.p. in charge of programing 

KTTV. Los Angeles 

**•••••• 

With a Heart." They added a "famil) 
room — a room that could be used as 
■: recreation area. tv room, den or 
'lining area. 

Mid, KRI/"~ air salesmen sta\ed 
right in step. 

Vs an addition to the basic heartbeat 
sound effect, the) concocted a fictitious 
character. Cecil The Talking Camel. 
who began making regular appear- 
and es in Del \\ ebb commercials. 

Here's how one "Cecil" commercial, 
taped in late September at KRIZ and 
transcribed for SPONSOR, made the 
point about the new "family room," as 
well as carrying out the basic "sell" 
for Camelback Village: 
Anncr: Say. here comes Cecil The 

9 JANUARY 1956 



Talking Camel, and he looks pretty 
excited. Cecil! You're trembling all 
over. Why all the excitement- 
Cecil: Rooooom. Roooom. 
Anncr: What room, Cecil? 
Cecil: The Fam-i-ly Rooo-ooom. 
Anncr: Family Room? Oh!! The 
Family Room in Camelback Village. 
Yes, folks. . . Now a family room has 
been added in Camelback Village. No 
wonder Cecil is excited, because this 
brings the floor space to almost 1,500 
feet! That's in the Del Webb "Home 



With a Heart" . . . only $13,460, in- 
cluding the fabulous GE Kitchen in 
bright decorator colors with automatic 
range, oven, clothes washer and dryer, 
sink and disposal all in one convenient 
unit. Six exterior designs to choose 
from . . . beautiful landscaped home 
sites. FHA and VA financing avail- 
able, and still no down payment to 
veterans. See the new, the bigger 
"Home With a Heart" ... Del Webb's 
Camelback Village . . . Open every 
night 'til 9 at 13th Avenue. . . 

— i 



tops 

in all 3 




in Columbia, South Carolina 

WIS-TV channel 10 

dominates all 3 . . . network, 
local productions, syndicated film. 

29 of the top 36 shows are on WIS-TV! 

here is WIS-TV's superiority in a nutshell — 



Quarter hours during which 2 or more stations are on the air 


DAYTIME M-F 11:15 am-6 pm 


NIGHTTIME 6 pm-ll:15 pm 


total quarter hours 135 


total quarter hours 124 


WIS-TV firsts 124 


WIS-TV firsts 105 



\ 



ARB Columbia, S. C, Nov. 13-19, 1955 • Based on highest rated quarter hours. 



! ' 



\\ 



Only WIS-TV reaches so many 
so much of the time. 

CHANNEL 10 




for details 

sec your 

FREE & PETERS man 



President, G. Richard Shafto 
Managing Director, Charles A. Batson 



COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA 



93 






SATELLITE LAUNCHED 




+," ' 



in Nebraska 



.•••*;.■ 



KHOL-TV's New Satellite Station, Built by 
Viewers' Funds, Gives You Bonus Coverage at 
No Extra Cost in Nebraska's 2nd Big Market 



KHOL-TV and Satellite 
Station cover rich Central 
Nebraska — the State's 2nd 
Big Market. 

KHOL-TV picks up where 
Omaha leaves off — you 
buy no duplicate coverage. 
One buy on KHOL-TV 
gives you bonus Satellite 
coverage at no extra cost. 
Investigate Nebraska's 2nd 
Big Market today — con- 
tact KHOL-TV or your 
Meeker representative. 

KHOL-TV 

Owned and Operated by 
BI-STATES CO. 

CBS ABC 




CHANNEL 13, KEARNEY, NEBRASKA 

Channel 6 Satellite Station, 

Hayes Center, Nebr. 

Represented nationally by Meeker TV, Inc. 




• TOPS N POPS 

• WONDERFUL MUSIC 
• RHYTHM N STUFF 
PI(JS • CONCERT CLASSICS 

+ HEADLINES AND WEATHER REPORTS WITH 
TOP LOCAL AND WORLD NEWS EVERY 30 MIN 




GREATER CLEVELAND'S 
NUMBER 1 STATION 

John E. Pearson Co., National Representatives 



Cecil: And Camelback Road. A real- 
ly fine place to live. 

Success story: Admen who read the 
above off-the-cuff commercial may be 
startled at how favorably it compares 
with many a spot radio commercial 
carefully and expensively hatched in 
the top ad agencies of Madison or 
Michigan Avenues. 

The answer is easy. KRIZ's air sales- 
men have developed a technique of 
dramatic ad-libbing during hundreds 
of hours of practice that have made the 
outlet, as one advertiser termed it, "a 
sales machine." 

The station's efforts, however, are 
not passing unnoticed outside of 
Phoenix. Not long ago, E. M. Haines, 
Manager of GE's Kitchen Center Divi- 
sion, listened to some of the KRIZ-Del 
Webb commercials, and officially re- 
quested permission to use the "Heart 
of the Home" idea in GE's schedule of 
merchandising for the new kitchen 
unit. 

The Del Webb firm, meanwhile, is 
contemplating a new round of home 
development activity in the Phoenix 
area, and is talking about expanding 
its present heavy schedule on the in- 
dependent radio outlet. 

Breen is not revealing his current 
sales figures, but he cheerfully admits 
having sold over seventy new homes 
(more than $1,000,000 worth) within 
the first sixty days of the campaign, 
at a cost of $2,600 of which $2,000 
was spent with KRIZ. 

Breen states that not only has he 
drawn three times the traffic of "look- 
ers" to his "Home with a Heart," but 
he has been able to close deals for 
three times as many customers as his 
competitors in the same price range 
of new homes. 

Amazingly this was during July 
and August when national weather- 
charts boost Phoenix — close to the 
top in high temperature cities. Since 
it is true that Phoenix homes are 
among the best refrigerated any- 
where, KRIZ air salesmen stressed 
that Camelback Village is a really 
"cool" place to live. 

Station Manager Loeb feels the 
KRIZ-Camelback Village sales effort 
may be an object lesson for radio 
station operators throughout the coun- 
try. He says: "It's apparent today 
that the station must try in every way 
possible to gain more liaison with the 
client, know his problems, what he's 
trying to accomplish." * * * 



94 



SPONSOR 



SPONSOR ASKS 

(Continued from page 83 ) 

would try to sell them with a pitchman 
technique, but does their aversion to 
the theatrical exclude the use of pre- 
miums as well? 

The ITA Code, which roughly corre- 
sponds to our NARTB Code, specifical- 
ly limits the type of advertising that 
may be placed in children's programs. 
These limitations bar la) encouraging 
children to speak to strangers in order 
to collect coupons; (b) appealing to a 
child's sense of loyalty to a character 
or situation; (c) causing a child to 
feel in any way inferior for not own- 
ing a product; (d) organization of a i 
"club" except under responsible con- 
trol and omitting all inference of "se- 
cret societies"; (el causing the child 
to be a nuisance to other people in the 
interests of any product or service. 

These limitations, applied to chil- 
dren's shows now on the air in this 
country, would likely void 90 f /o of 
their current commercials. How do 
British sponsors observe these restric- 
tions and still sell solidly to the kids? 

Many of the other advertising ap- 
proaches that Americans take for 
granted might also be too high pres- 
sure for Britons. I do believe though, 
that entertainment is entertainment, 
here or abroad. Early rating figures 
on the American shows indicate that 
Londoners liked our tv programs, so I 
think that if an American advertiser 
used a commercial on British tv that is 
entertaining by our standards, he 
couldn't go far wrong. 

Of course many of the generaliza- 
tions current today will change as the 
idea of commercial tv becomes more 
commonplace in Britain. By the time 
the audiences get over the novelty of 
dancing cigarette packs, there will be 
enough information available for 
American advertisers to custom-design 
a pitch for British viewers with every 
likelihood of success. Maybe we will 
even begin to translate some of their 
more successful jobs to our tv screen. 
As I said, entertainment is entertain- 
ment, and we are always willing to 
learn more about it. * * * 




MAX FACTOR 

I Continued from page 31) 

women are never satisfied with the way 
they look! That's why the industry is 
as competitive as it is." 

And, it might be noted, that's also 
the reason for the wide diversity of 
products available. Factor's own line 
is a long one, including the usual sta- 
ples of lipstick, face powder, rouge, 
etc., and its own special items. 

In fighting for milady's buck, how- 
ever, each product must stand on its 
own pretty container. For instance, 
copy for one item, "Creme Puff," a 



blend of powder and creamy make-up 
base, warns women to give up "old- 
fashioned" powder. Currently, how- 
ever, powder sales are up. 

Now that DDB has the whole Factor 
line, some pretty heady story boards 
result. Take this commercial seen on 
spot tv across the nation (and shown 
on page 31 with the start of this arti- 
cle) : 

As the commercial begins you're 
looking in the doorway to a pictur- 
esque patio. Close up is a girl singing, 
with French accent. It's a sultry song 
that follows you as you retreat to with- 
in view of a young couple. They are 



m WIBW-TV 

HAS THE 

CLEAREST 
PICTURE* 



— that's what TopekAREA viewers told Dr. Whan's sur- 
veyors!* Add the clearest picture to a proven preference 
for WIBW-TV's sports, news, weather, and farm service, 
and you have the reason why WIBW-TV is most watched 
throughout the farms and small towns in 20 Kansas 
counties. 

*Dr. Forest Whan's TV Study of the 
TopekAREA Audience, a gold mine of hard- 
to-find information on TV listening habits, is 
yours for the asking. Just call your Capper 
man or write Topeka. 




CBS 
ABC 



The Kansas View Point 



9 JANUARY 1956 



TOPEKA, KANSAS 

Ben Ludy, Cen. Mgr. 
WIBW & WIBW-TV in Topeka 

KCKN in Kansas City 
Rep: Capper Publications, Inc. 



95 



absorbed in each other, oblivious to 
the storm mounting around them — and 
within them. A flash of lightning! The 
frightened girl flings herself into the 
mans arms and holds still for a long 
e.c.u. She's lovely. Another bolt of 
lightning . . . and a perfume bottle — 
Max Factors "Electrique" — appears 
. . . then titles. Another flash, followed 
by gift sets. . . . 



There's something for the men too. 
In another one-minute commercial old 
seedy Joe himself enters his bathroom 
with the look of one who has slept bel- 
ter nights. Soap, water, stop-motion. 



and Max Factor mens products com- 
bine to make him progressively more 
appealing — so much so that his wife 
presents a formidable barrier on his 
way out the door. "No woman will 
let you go when you wear Max Factor's 
grooming essentials for men." says the 
t.nnouncer. as she puts a half-nelson 
on him for a goodbxe kiss. 

I he Factor family's experience glam- 
orizing the fairer sex goes back to the 
days of the flapper. Probabl) it all be- 
gan when D. \\ . ("Birth of a Nation") 
Griffiths dollied in for the silent 
screen's first real close-up. Griffiths. 



SUNDAYS, MONDAYS and Att WAYS 

WOLF 



has a lion's share of audience 



SUNDAYS (daytime) 



32.6% 



1st PLACE 



MONDAY 
thru SATURDAY 



WOLF 

Share of Audience 



Mornings 8 A.M. - 12 Noon 


16.9% 


2nd 


PLACE 


Afternoons 12 Noon - 6 P.M. 


33.3% 


1st 


PLACE 


Evenings 6 P.M. - 10:30 P.M. 


29.7% 


1st 


PLACE 



everywhere you go . . . 

MONDAY thru FRIDAY 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. 

Barber Shops 50% (tie) 1st PLACE 

Beauty Shops 31% 1st PLACE 

Cleaners 23.1% . 2nd PLACE 

Dentists 24.6% 1st PLACE 

Drugstores 36.4% 1st PLACE 

Grocery Stores 47.3% 1st PLACE 



Service Stations 51% 



1st PLACE 



RATING for RATING - RATE for RATE 
in CENTRAL NEW YORK 



it's 



FREE • • • Get the whole story (Spring 
19551 covering home-auto-store listening, 4 
and 8 year trends, TV operating hours, also 
new (C. E. Hooper, October 1955) Business 
Establishments Survey. Included are the basic 
market tacts on population, labor force, in- 
dustrial work hours, automobiles, telephones, 
and monthly sales comparisons. Ask for your 
copy of The Syracuse Inside Story. 



WOLF 



SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



National Sales Representatives 

THE WALKER COMPANY 



they say, was way ahead of his time. 
He certainly was ahead of his make-up 
men; they just weren't equipped for 
that t\ pe of camera work. They used 
only two kinds of powder — white and 
flesh-colored — okay for long shots hut 
murder on extreme mug shots. 

Result: Mae Bush. Theda Bara and 
other glamorous sirens of the day 
showed up as past\ -faced hags. 

It was at this point that Max Factor 
Sr. entered the picture with improve- 
ments in makeup that revolutionized 
the art of motion picture photography. 

Original!) an immigrant Polish wig- 
maker before he went to Hollywood. 
Factor developed softer shades that al- 
lowed more filming flexibility. He 
came up with new. more subtle and 
subdued shades of rouge, a foundation 
cream lhat was easier to apply. Before 
long such stars as Norma Talmadge. 
Billie Dove. Mary Pickford and Gloria 
Swanson began wearing their movie 
make-up off the lot. That was good 
enough for Mrs. American Housewife. 



*'lt is almost literally impossible for a 
uhf station to compete successfully in a 
city where there are two vhf stations, 
unless the uhf was the first one on the 
air, and even then it is difficult. Uhf 
works well in uhf-only markets, but 
against strong vhf competition it is not 
equal to the task. Yet uhf stations are 
needed to cover the country." 

ROBERT E. KINTNER 

President 

ABC 



who till then had shunned any kind of 
make-up as too bizarre, cheap. Factor 
showed a read\ aptitude for merchan- 
dising bv anticipating the demand. 
When, in the mid-30's, thousands of 
American women clamored to follow 
Jean Harlow's switch to platinum 
blonde hair. Factor provided the 
bleach. 

Following Max Factor Sr. s death in 
1938. his sons took over the business. 
Davis, as chairman of the board, han- 
dled the financial end. and Max Jr.. as 
president, is in charge of developing 
new products. 

They had one of their first and most 
important successes when the film mak- 
ers came up with the faster panchro- 
matic film. Being more sensitive, it 
required an even smoother texture on 
the stars complexions. The Factors 
created a flesh-colored make-up that 
could be applied with a sponge and 
called it. after the film that spawned it, 
"Pan-Cake." 



96 



SPONSOR 



Latest product, introduced last May. 
is "Hi-Fi." a fluid make-up developed 
as a result of Max Factor Jr.'s re- 
search in color tv. Pitch, also being 
made via tv commercials, tells how ob- 
solete all tv make-up has become since 
the arrival of color tv, how well ''Hi- 
Fi" looks in bright sunlight, in artifi- 
cial light, in romantic candle-light. 

Just as his father was beautician to 
the movie industry, Max Jr. is con- 
sultant and trouble-shooter to many in 
the tv industry. Most of his problems, 
naturally, come from color tv. NBC 
TV realized early in the game that the 
range of colors available in make-up 
for black-and-white television was in- 
adequate for colorcasts. A particular 
stickler was the task of finding sub- 
dued shades that would allow com- 
plexions to appear lifelike on color as 
well as black-and-white, since the latter 
is all most homes would have for an- 
other few years. 

In Julv, 1954, after seven months of 
research, experiments, testing, report- 
ing, the job was completed. The next 
month, experts gathered in a Los 
Angeles studio for a final test. Every 
possible challenge was thrown at the 
cameras — and Factors handiwork. 
Verdict: perfection. 

Early this year the Hollywood com- 
pany will tnove into its new $2-million 
building in the film capital. The Ca- 
nadian branch of the firm has plan? 
for construction of a new building in 
Toronto to accommodate offices and 
expanding factory operations. Last 
April the company bought a 50,000- 
square-foot building in Hollywood for 
warehousing and shipping operations. 

Max Factor is one company whose 
future is closely linked with the future 
ol tv — both the meat and the bread- 
and-butter ends of it. * * * 




"I find that listening to KRIZ 
Phoenix develops my savoir faire." 



HEADACHES 

{Continued from page 33) 

time periods, you can picture the 
problems of keeping competing prod- 
ucts apart." 

The headache of juggling schedules 
extends to programing balance too. 
For example, a number of station 
managers mentioned the decision 
they're faced with: spending pro- 
graming budgets on the periods that 
sell anyhow 1 and improve shows in 
those or "risk program development 
capital to draw in new audiences 
and advertisers in fringe or tough 
radio time. Many try to do both, 
but when program budgets hinge on 
sales, it can be tough to find funds 
for new "creative programing." 

• ••••*•• 

". . . Tv viewers indicate definitely and 
impressively that preference is for less 
flamboyance in commercial claims and 
statements, and for direct information 
about specific products, simply stated 
without exaggeration. Commercials need 
to be given so that they can be retained 
by memories of average ability. Too 
many words spoken hurriedly in any 
commercial make for confusion in the 
mind of the audience. Don't "smog up" 
the airwaves. Instead, just "give 'em 
the facts, m'am," and do it in a way 
that's entertaining." 

EARL J. HUDSON 

Vice president. Western Division 

American Broadcasting Co. 

*••••*•* 

Surveys: Suppose a station's all set 
with its programing structure, is it 
smooth sailing for the stations man- 
ager from then on in? Not by a long 
shot. 

Here's how the manager of a Mid- 
western station referred to the head- 
aches he and all others have with rat- 
ing sen ices: "Were dismayed by the 
discrepancies between Hooper. Pulse. 
Nielsen. Trendex and so forth. Person- 
ally we like Hooper's telephone coin- 
cidental and wish agencies would ac- 
cept this technique as producing the 
most definitive survexs. 

Other stations, ol course, endorse 
other services. The main point to re- 
member is this: So long as there is no 
one accepted way of measuring listen- 
ership. station managers will be tempt- 
ed to dig into their supply of aspirins. 
For one thing, the competing station 
in the market ma\ use different figures 
in its sales pitch. For another consid- 
eration, the agency or client ap- 
proached b) the station max rel\ on a 
different service. 



NOW! 

CBS 

radio 
in the 
TRI- CITIES 

Johnson City 
Kings port 
Bristol 

PLUS 

Elizabethton 

Green eville 
Erwin 

PLUS 

Wealthy Suburban 
and Rural Coverage 
in 32 Counties 

NOW 

WJHL 

Johnson City, Term. 
is 

CBS RADIO 

5000 W 910 kc 

John E. Pearson Co. Reps. 



9 JANUARY 1956 



97 



DAY... 




SALT LAKE'S 




24-HOUR 




"INDEPENDENT" 




...AND NIGHT 




soon going 5,UUU WATTS 



HOOPER— FEB. 1955 



KNAK 

STATION "A" 
STATION "B" 
STATION "C" 
STATION "D" 



27.8 

27.2 

14.6 

13.7 

7.2 



Independent 

NETWORK 
NETWORK 
NETWORK 
NETWORK 



YOU'RE ON THE RIGHT 

TRACK WITH KAY-NAK 

Lowest Cost Per Listener 




^^ 



REP. NATIONALLY BY FORJOE a CO.. INC. 



"The differences in ways of arriving 
at ratings," said a rural network affili- 
ate, "are enough to drive a guy insane. 
To put it more soundly, it's a dailv 
problem to contend with in our deal- 
ings with reps and buyers." 

Data requests: "We always try to 
cooperate with any agency requesting 
data on competitive schedules," a sta- 
tion manager told sponsor. "After all, 
there isn't any secret about what we 
broadcast. We wish, however, there 
were a set limit on the amount of audi- 
ence, product and market data we're 
expected to supply." 

While this headache ties in with 
sales problems, it does add to the sta- 
tion manager's operational costs. 

"We've got to hire extra research 
men and services." said a New England 
operator. "And, let's face it, we all 
have to justify our budgets whether 
to ourselves at income tax time or to 
the owners we're responsible to." 

Late copy: This may appear minor 
but causes amazingly regular crises in 
most stations — late arrival of e.t.'s or 
copy. 

"Not to mention last-minute client- 
inspired copy changes." an exasperated 
station man added. 

Station managers are generally sym- 
pathetic to the problems involved in 
getting copy done or e.t.'s delivered. 

"There's a sizable batch of people 
involved on varying levels, none of 
whom need be personally blamed," the 
owner of a rural 250-watter said. "But 
we're not like a newspaper that we can 
add fillers or take out a full-page form. 
Once we have a committment for a cer- 
tain amount of airtime, that time rolls 
around and we've got to fill it." 

Adds another station operator: "Cli- 
ents are cutting their own throats if 
they don't sit on people who're deliver 
well ahead of time. After all, getting 
the right time slot alone isn't the whole 
answer for the advertiser either. A 
commercial sloppily delivered because 
of late scripts or script changes won t 
sell the advertiser's product. And of 
course then he gripes to us." 

FCC practices: Problems there are 
in governmental regulations for the ra- 
dio station manager, but they vary ac- 
cording to size and nature of the sta- 
tion. 

Said one Midwestern indie: "The 
FCC appears to take a dim view of 



announcements, which are the life- 
blood of an independent sta'.ion. If we 
were to sell only programs, we could 
run a continuous 15-minute commercial 
( which we certainly would not do I and 
the FCC would not be concerned, be- 
cause their analysis wouldn't disclose 
such a practice. Yet. I if we run 1,000 
announcements a week I no double- 
spotting and no more than three or 
four spots per quarter-hour) we're 
likely to be called a dirty name. Like- 
wise, if we abstain from agricultural 
programing I only about l'/i of our 
families are 'rural' or 'farm' families) 
questions might be asked." 

Public service programing require- 
ments cause station managers head- 
aches both with FCC, the listening pub- 
lic and in cost. 

"We program a substantial percent- 
age of programing for such sustainers 
as religion, weather and other public 
service," an Eastern network affiliate 
mentioned. "Yet, if one letter comes in 
from a listener who doesn't tune in 
religious or certain other public service 
programnig and has his own pet cause, 
there's an UDroar. Guess who gets the 
letter and answers it personally usu- 
ally? Me." 

Talent headaches: The station man- 
ager's problem in the talent area is 
two-fold : 111 he's got to get the best 
talent available to attract listeners and 
get ratings, within his budget confines; 
(2) if his talent gets too popular, 
chances are his direct competitor or 
competing media will make offers to 
that talent that his budget can't meet. 
"We had one particular case of ex- 
cessive success," said the manager of a 
Southern 50 kw. "One of our an- 
nouncers sold a certain seasonal prod- 
uct as if the thing were on a fire sale. 
The client liked him so much, he gave 



1,000,000 

WATTS 

st in Power 

and Coverage 



^^Wilkes-Barre 
Scranton 

Call Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



98 



SPONSOR 



him a contract to make all e.t.'s. and 
now our announcer's in the city earn- 
ing himself beyond the next two income 
brackets. I wish him well, but where 
does it leave us?" 

Unions: Unions are a recurring thorn 
to the station manager. Every time a 
new contract's up, he's negotiating 
again, with the budget standing over 
his head like a hangman. But most 
station managers take this headache 
in their stride because it's an antici- 
pated problem. 

"And don't forget this," cautioned a 
chubby Western station operator who's 
managed to kep his hair in his late 
sixties despite these headaches. "Our 
unionized help isn't the only factor 
driving operational costs up constantly. 
But you can figure out yourself that if 
the unionized or technical help negoti- 
ates raises, the unorganized staff mem- 
bers are influenced too." 



>/ 



"Television is already a billion dollar 
industry. With the surge of color, it will 
top two billion, three billion, or five 
billion annually. There's no foresee- 
able limit to the potential. Color tele- 
vision is truly wonderful and hundreds 
of thousands of people can afford sets 
now, at today's prices of $795 and 
$895. And countless hundreds of thou- 
sands of others soon will be able to buy 
color sets within the coming year, as 
production increases and prices are ad- 
justed downward." 

ROBERT A. SEIDEL 

Executive Vice President 

Consumer Products 

RCA 



Setting rates: Like the setting of 
sales policy, the rate structure is the 
station manager's job. And hardly a 
station manager interviewed by spon- 
sor has neglected mentioning this head- 
ache fairly close to the top of the list. 
"Pricing any product or service is 
always a tough responsibility," said 
an Ohio indie. "But since tv, it's been 
tougher than I can say. For one thing, 
there's such a large number of factors 
to consider: (1) actual tv competition 
during peak viewing time; (2| imag- 
ined competition on the part of buyers 
from agencies to clients who get bogged 
down by prejudices; (3) the com- 
petitive picture, such as the rate struc- 
ture, beyond the commercial success, 
of the competitor. Let's face it. this is 
not a constant, but a sizable, maybe 
annual or bi-annual problem." * * * 




PAL^^ 



"Happy Nineteen Hundred Fifty- 
Six to you all. . . We in the 
kennel sincerely hope that the 
coming year will bring you every- 
thing your little hearts desire. . . . 

One good resolution to make 
would be to include w-PAL in 
your budget. Investigate! We'd 
be happy to serve you — 'n then 
it would be a happy new year for 
us both!" 



w-PAL 

of Charleston 
South Carolina 



I 



Represented by 
Forjoe & Company 



IN EVANSVILLE INDIANA 
WISE 
BUYERS 
CHOOSE 




A oALtb Answer From Late Viewers. 

"A Local Clothing Store With 

ONLY 3 Announcements on 

THE NIGHTCAPPERS' 

Sold 125 Dozen TIES." 
— YOU TOO CAN U?E — 
"The Nightcappers" 

MON. thru FRI. — 10:30-11:30 P.M. 
WEHT-TV Live Variety Show 
Contact Our Representatives 

MEEKER TV, INC. —ADAM YOUNC 
St. Louis 



CHANNEL 50 




NOW OPERATING 
WEOA— CBS RADIO 



£30**? 



c 



C-TV 

City's 
owerful 
ation 




"BIG TIME DAYTIME" programming with any 
commercial handling vou want . . . live camera* 
always available. 

"BIGTIME DAYTIME" precedes the sensational 
new ABC-TV evening schedules. Contact Free 
&. Peters or: 

Don Davis, First Vice President 
John Schilling, Vice Pres. & Gen. Mgr. 
George Higgins, Vice Pres. & Sales Mgr. 
Mori Greiner, Director of Television 



9 JANUARY 1956 



99 



MARKETING & TV 

{Continued from page 29 I 

combination of tv and radio spot. 
i "The incredible tv success story of 
Saran Wrap" in the 20 September 
1954 issue of sponsor represents a 
typical example of matching the target 
area to available tv coverage. ) 

To borrow a simile, television has 
become the horse and the marketing 
plan, the cart. Such juxtaposition is 
without precedent in media history. 

4. Merchandising: \\ has enhanced 
the value of more and better merchan- 
dising at the point-of-sale. Dealers, 
like anybody else, are responsive to 
the excitement and glamor of tele- 
vision. Not onl) will they stock rela- 
tively more of a tv -advertised product 
but they'll give the merchandising of 
the product bigger and better display. 
But they expect such merchandising to 
be in keeping with the glamor of tele- 
vision. Floor and counter display is at 
a greater premium than ever, but 
astute merchandising men have learned 
that a superior piece ul promotion re- 
lating to a tv campaign will induce the 
dealer to make place for it. This ap- 



plies to both in-store and window dis- 
play. Revlon demonstrated how a man- 
ufacturer can establish what amounts 
to a window franchise through its ex- 
ploitation of the $64,000 Question. 
For a succession of many weeks Rev- 
Ion held drugstore windows with a dis- 
play piece containing a frame into 
which each week a picture of the cur- 
rent top money contender was slipped 
and a legend attached: "Will I so-and- 
so) go for the I amount at stake)?" 

.>. Contests: Television has hypoed 
tremendously the effectiveness of con- 
tests tied in with advertising cam- 
paigns. It's the onl) medium that not 
onl) permits the showing of the prizes 
but their demonstration. Such con- 
tests work two ways: 111 The show 
createst excitement for the prizes and 
I 2 I the proper merchandising of the 
contest at the point of sale promotes 
a bigger audience for the allied show. 
To cite one example: Ruppert Beer, 
which distributes in the New York 
merlopolitan area and lower New Eng- 
land, ran a six-week contest this fall, 
offering a large variety of prizes. The 
contest mil (mix drew around \r> mil- 
lion entries al points-of-sale but jacked 



U* 






use 






Ohio s ^ f Be tter tl ~ " ^ t & 

be« et g f Ve »to 
- »e« et ;,e 



vou' ie 



toP 



tuusic 



to 



do^° 



a 



itVtct 



*Vf° n 



■i° 




ab ov* ^ . ce ^C\3t 
*° ad tbe *** Id «** 



tVve w u ' t e 

\#Yvett K 



*** pa tucuV»« sS be 

lot «** P ttS eO^ U 




oW 






up the rating of Ruppert's portion of 
the Steven Allen show on NBC tv. 

ft. Sells customers" customers: 

The heavy metallic industries have 
lound television a potent force for ver- 
tically integrated marketing of their 
products. Two outstanding success 
stories in this category are U.S. Steel 
and Alcoa. Both originally set out to 
do an institutional job. Both wound 
up not only merchandising their own 
basic product but the fabricated prod- 



* y 



"Television's phenomenal expansion 
across the nation has created an audi- 
ence of buyers that runs into the hun- 
dreds of millions. Perhaps more than 
any other advertising medium, tv today 
is exerting an almost immeasurable im- 
pact on American buying habits — and. 
as such has become a prime tool of 
modern, mass competitive selling." 

ROBERT A. SEIDEL 

Executive Vice President 

Consumer Products 

RCA 



ucts of their customers customers. \<, 
illustration of this would be wire. Each 
ul these company manufacture only 
ihe raw product. The wire in turn is 
sold to a broker, who, in turn, sells it 
to a fabricator. I!\ showing images 
and demonstrations of the finished 
products the producer of the basic ma- 
terial creates a need that extends down 
through the fabricator and all the wa\ 
to the consumer. I elevision affords 
the basic material manufacturer a mar- 
keting pressure that no other form of 
advertising has been, or i-. able to de- 
lixer. *•* 




John E. Pearson Co., National Representatives 



"He says only the right things — 
listens to KRIZ Phoenix all day 
long." 



100 



SPONSOR 




See: 



Robot retailing: air advertising will 
lie more essential than ever 



Issue: 23 March 195.S. page 34 

Subject: Presetting and automatic sales 



\\ hat effect will automation have on the people in the broadcast 
industry? Not too much, if we base a prediction on the results of 
WHDH. Boston's trial of the technique for radio selling. 

Following a hook re\ iew program, listeners were advised that they 
might order a copy of the book sent C.O.D. by dialing "the follow- 
ing number." Upon reaching the number, the listener heard a re- 
corded voice announce that this was a recorded phone conversation 
and ask that the caller give his name and address when he heard a 
"'beep" sound. 

When the station staff played the recording back on the next day. 
thev found some unexpected results. Callers became flustered when 
the> found themselves addressed b\ a recording and gave a variety 
of replies when asked to record their name and address. 

Calls to the station the next day and checks of book stores re- 
vealed that people had a distrust and awe of the recording of their 
name and address. One listener summed it up by saying, "It's spooky 
talking to a 'beep. I he station responded by announcing that its 
personnel need have no fear of automation: the personal touch is 
still required in selling. 



See: The New Radio 

Issue: 19 April 1954. page 31 

Subject: Companionabilitj of radio today 



New Yorkers and Jerse\ites will be shown the advantages of 
radio listening through a medium rarely used for the job in that 
area. Car cards will blossom forth in some 3.200 public conveyances 
with a message indicating that women can do household chores with 
radio that become impossible while they pay attention to tv. 

The first card in the series is shown below. Others will follow with 
pitches directed towards factory worker-, car drivers and other 
groups more able to listen to radio than watch t\ . The messages are 
designed to plug radio per se, but also indicate that WMGM. New 
York, is a good bet for the listener. 

Commented station director Arthur Tolchin, "One of the many 
great plusses in radios future is its adaptability to any listening 
situation. We hope to remind the listener of this adaptability . 

Coverage for the start of the campaign will include the Fifth 
Avenue Coaches as yvell as Public Sen ices buses throughout north- 
ern New Jersey, the stations primary coy erase area. The campaign 
may be expanded later if there is sufficient response. 




• * * 



Car cards point up radios conr.parconabiliry to housewives in New York-New Jersey 




«1 



£32 



housewife Brown used a visuat means 
to lessen the doily tedium 
after ironing the squash 
JL and cooking the wash w ™1 ■ 

she s bock to her favorite medium... RADIO STATK 1\ 



lOSO 



a* »cu» mwc hii 



whatever you re doing you can liiten and enjoy \f%/ Wmm €J W W 9 
9 JANUARY 1956 



the 
big 
talk 







is 



about 

kbis 



bakersfield 
California 



970 



DOMINATING CALIFORNIA'S 
SOUTHERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY 
WITH POPULAR MUSIC AND NEWS 
24 HOURS A DAY! 



NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 

ST. LOUIS ADAM YOUNG, JR. 

SAN FRANCISCO representative 

LOS ANCELES 



101 




THE ONLY CBS PROGRAMMING AVAIL- 
ABLE TO A MILLION NICE PEOPLE! 

From 7 A.M. to 1 A.M. 
Yep! Bigger'n Baltimore! 




HAYDN R. EVANS. Gen. Mgr. • WEED TV, Rep. 



John plays music they like, 
makes them like your product! 
Good buy, 3:30 to 5:45 PM Mon. 
thru Fri., 2:00 to 4:00 PM Sat. 



CBS in 
Baltimore 



WCA0 



ROUND-UP 

(Continued from page 86) 

Several "corny" but effective promo- 
tions were used to attract attention to 
the lot. The commercials warned cus- 
tomers to: bring your own flashlight 
because the profits are too small to al- 
low night lighting; look under the 
hoods because the cars are priced so 
low you can't be sure there is a motor 
included unless you check it yourself; 
bring your own paint, if you want to 
repaint a car, we'll furnish the brush. 

Commercials were aired in Joe Fi- 
nan's Fine 'n Dandy d.j. show and the 
disk jockey began to broadcast his en- 
tire show (1:30-6:45 p.m.) from the 
lot. Crowds so disrupted traffic that 
the plan had to be scrapped, but it 
helped boost sales. 

Many of the ideas that helped spark 
the sales climb originated at the sta- 
tion in the mind of account executive 
Will Dougherty. One of his plans was 
to dress the salesmen very informally 
in flannel shirts to create a friendly 
atmosphere for the customers, mainly 
college students and plant workers. 
( See photo page 86. ) 

The ad approach was apparently 
successful because buyers came from 
as far as 70 miles away to see specials 
advertised on Fine '« Dandy. Owner 
Bud Carter needs a high turnover of 
slock to make a profit, and WJW ad- 
vertising provided the proper ratio, he 
stated. 

ftacfto announcements boost 
charter bus service trade 

When Continental Trailways began 
an announcement schedule on WDIA, 
Memphis, they tapped a reservoir of 
new business in the form of the sta- 
tion's loyal Negro audience. Three 
one-minute participating announce- 
ments per week on Tan Town Coffee 
Cub with Nat D. Williams, brought 
the bus company most of the charter 
service from Memphis Negro schools, 
schools. 

These schools frequently charter 
buses to transport their athletic teams 
to contests conducted in other cities. 
Surrounding localities also have high 
schools that have become Continental 
clients since the campaign began. 
Individual listeners to the station have 
substantially increased the line's gen- 
eral passenger traffic in the same peri- 
od. The station promotes this section 
of the company's service by using it in 



102 



SPONSOR 




KVWO 

is the CHAMP! 

. . TOP HOOPER STATION 
IN WONDERFUL WYOMING 

Represented Nationally by . . . 
JOS. HERSHEY McGILLVRA 

New York • Chicago • Atlanta 
Los Angeles • San Francsico 

Write, Wire, Phone William T. Kemp 

Box 926 • Ph: 2-6433 

Cheyenne, Wyoming 



NORTH CAROLINA'S 

GOLDEN TRIANGLE 




HIGH POINT 



GREENSBORO I 



TO THE BIG VOICE 



RADIO 

WINSTON-SALEM 



NORTH CAROLINA 




llfor 



WINSTON-SALEM 
GREENSBORO 
HIGH POINT 

5000 w • 600 KC • AM-fM 

HEADLEY-REED. Representatives 



all of their annual promotions includ- 
ing a station beauty contest. 

Briefly . . . 

A Buffalo appliance dealer recently 
celebrated his 20th anniversary as 
sponsor of a segment of Clint Buehl- 
man's three-hour morning show. The 
John Henrich Co. started its associa- 
tion with the wake-up disk jockey in 
1935 when he was on WGR. The spon- 
sor followed the show to WBEN when 
Buehlman shifted in 1943. * * * 



40 E. 49TH ST. 

{Continued from page 15) 

sponsor carried this series several 
years ago — the series captioned: "Ac- 
count executive with sponsor on his 
tail," . . . "Radio Director," etc. I 
am sure you know the ones I am re- 
ferring to. 

I have long considered these carica- 
tures the ultimate when it comes to 
satirizing our industry. In short, they 
are really terrific, and I'd like to get 
as many as I can — suitable for fram- 
ing — for my office. 

Any help you can give me along 
these lines would be greatly appre- 
ciated. Naturally I'd be most happy 
to pay any cost involved. 

Frank B. Price 

Harrington, Righter and 

Parsons Inc. 

Chicago 

• The Jaro Hess earieatures apparently have a 
hiph memory impaet ratine. Thouph they haven't 
been mentioned in SPONSOR for some years, 
readers like Frank Riee periodirally inquire about 
them. Unfortunately, however, all stoeks of the 
earieatures have been exhausted. 



COM PARAGRAPH NOTES 

(Continued from page 76) 

Speidel. SSCB: NISC. Sat 7:30-8 pm 
btaley Mlg.. It.vit ills, an M lit: 15-30 am 
s:~*, r « o.„-.., in.,., nrp vj 5 : 3ii « nn , 
State Farm Inc.. NLAB, .VRC. F 1080-11 pm 

S*# 'in n.,. fl ri i- c t pi I- n -in 111 • *n 

i. P. Stevens. B. Houston: CBS. S 6-6:30 pm 

Oil.,, umi u,K*ilU .... i. ,**i w s a.oU ylD 

Sunbeam. Pirrin-Paus. NBC, T 8-9 pm 
Sweets. Moselle & Klsen: NBC. Sat 10:30-11 am 
Swift. .IWT: McC-E: DTN. Th 1:45-2 pm 
Sylvanii. JUT: CBS. Sat 7:30-8 pm 
Tixas Co.. Kudnei Mft . Sai •■ :su lo pm 
Tonl Co.. \V*n, CBS. M 8:45-9 pm: W 8-830 
pm; M. W 11-11:15 am: alt Th 10:15-30 
am: Burnett: NBC. Sun 7 7:30 pm : CBS. 
Th 3:30-45 pm: Sat 9-9:1.1 pm: Tatham- 
lalnl: ABC partlr S 8:30-9 pm 
TV Time Foods, rilrert: CBS. Tu 5-5:15 pm 
U s swi. nnnn rn<t alt w lo-ll pm 
Vlcks. BBDO: W 5-5:15 pm 

Wander Co.. Tatham-I.alrd: NBC. W 10:15-30 am 
Warner- Hudnut. K&E: NBC. alt Sat 10:30-11 pm 
WeKter. Chicago. .I\\" Shan: NBC. M 7:30-45 pm 
Welch Grape Julee. nCSS: NBC. alt F 5:45-6 

pm: ABC. T 5:15-5:30 pm 
Wesson Oil. Pliziterald: CBS. Tu 12-12:15 pm 
w «•»»- Union X'hert Frank-Ouenther-I.aiv: Th 
Weitinghoute. HcCann-Erlckson: CBS. M 10-11 po 
Wiiri.in Drugs. Product, Liu Mom. T 9-10 pm 
Whirlpool. K&E. NBC. T 8-9 pm 
Whitehall Pnarm. Illtm Beim Inigo: CBS. Sat 
9:30-10 pm: CBS. M 7:30-7:45 pm : T 7:30- 
8 pm; W 6:30-7. 7-30-7:45; F 6:30-7, 
7:30-7:45; NBC. W 10:30-11 pm 
9:30-10 pm 



L^ 



POWER 
LUMBER 

AGRICULTURE. 



la 



r 9er 



°"/o 



9on. 
9on' s 

c o»Me 
OQq , 



"""fcef 



nd 



*£*G 



( e Co 



ltd 



N 



Sth 



°rfh 



Of 

F «9; 
in 



""Yint 
$242, 



rye * 
"Kirk 



re. 



et 



»e st . 



th 



e P 



"6, 
'onlf. 
"cific 



'955 



C BS Kadio 

s. ooo wArrs - 1280 kc 



"SIX 



EUGENE. OREGON 

WANT MOAE FAcrs ? 

-COAtrACr W£ED e CO. 



ATN 



Am Trails Network 

promotes sales in a 

BILLION 
MARKET 

Dayton 

Louisville 

Columbus 

Springfield 

Ashland-Huntington 

( nil any HR Office for 

WINf.-WCOL— WTZE 

WCMI 

or 

John Blair & Co. for WKLO 



WING WKLO 



EEPfl 



9 JANUARY 1956 



103 



ASK THE MAN 

IN THE GREY 

FLANNEL SUIT! 




BERNIE HOWARD 
Stars-National, New York 

HE KNOWS! 

1. THE BEST RADIO BUY 

2. THE BEST AREA BUY 

3. THE BEST MARKET BUY 

PLUS 



Complete Product Merchandising 
all at NO EXTRA COST! 

94% NEGRO PROGRAMMING 

KSAN 

SAN FRANCISCO 

RICHARD BOTT, Station Manager 



mmwn 



11 MWttlffl 



o o 





Vfilfoii If. ftioic, chairman of the board of Biow- 
Beirn-Toigo, announced the agency had been 
awarded the Joseph Schlitz Brewing Co. account, 
effective 1 March L956. Schltl2 left Lennen 4' Newell 
despite the fact that the company revealed it is again 
the number one beer producer in the country. The 
i, (count's $9 million billing will offset the agency's 
surprising loss of the $8 million Pepsi-Cola account 
that fooled Madison Are. guessers by moving to 
K&E. Schlitz spends about $3 million annually 
on tv. sponsors Schlitz Playhouse of Stars (Fri., 
CBS Tl 9-9:30 p.m.), also uses some spot tv. 



ftollailfl IV. Taylor has been named executive 
vice president of Foote. Cone & Belding in charge 
of the New York Office and a director of the com- 
pany. He returned to the agency after three years us 
vice president in charge of advertising for the Colgate- 
Palmolive Co. His earlier experience with F, C & B 
started in Chicago in 1918 when he was on the 
Pepsodent dcount, later moved to the New York 
office on Hiram Walker and General Foods accounts 
before joining Colgate in 1951. He also had been 
with Esly, the American Weekly in charge of 
merchandising^ and the Kroger Co. 



EtavUI B. II ill Ml III* is the newly elected presi- 
dent of Frwin. Wasey & (o. His father, Howard D. 
Williams, moved from president to chairman of 
the board when the two admen bought the agency. 
The new president has been with the 11-year old 
agency lor the past 10 years, moved up from the 
post of executive vice president which he received in 
1952. His last post is being filled by Lorry R. 
\orlhrap. who has ben vice president and general 
manager of the Chicago office for the past 15 years. 
There are no policy changes planned by the agency. 



MatthetU 1 FOX, president of C&C Television Corp.. 
made the largest pure hose in the history of the tele- 
vision and motion picture industries when he paid 
fl5,200;000 for 740 feature and over 1,000 short 
subjects from RKO Radio Pictures. The original 
cost of the films was $750 million, would cost $1.3 
billion today. RKO ivas bought five months ago from 
Howard Hughes by General Teleradio who retains 
exclusive telecasting rights in the six markets in 
which it owns tv stations. These exclusive markets 
are: New )ork: Los Angeles: Boston: Hartford: 
If est /'aim Beach. Fla: Memphis. 



104 



SPONSOR 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



ABC TV .Network 


_ 66-67 


Air Trails Group — 


103 


Blair TV J .. 


61 




.... 105 


Hollywood TV Service 


6-7 




87 




16 


A. C. Nielsen, Inc. 


._. 13 


Noemac Stations 


."» 


Pulse, Inc. 


74 


RCA TV Equipment 


77 




106 


Adam Young, Inc. --- 


BC 


Ziv-TV - . . 


__ ..52-53 


CKLW. Detroit 


102 



KATV, Vim- Bluff, Ark. 
KBIO, Hollywood 
KBIS, Bakersfield 
KDLO-TV, Florence, S.D. 

KELO-TV, Sioux Kails. S.D. 

KENS-TV, San Antonio . 
KElfO, Eugene, Ore. 
KFWB, Hollywood 
KHOI,-TV, Kearney. Nebr. .._. 

KLZ, Denver 

KMEC-TV, Kansas City 

K.MPC, Los Angeles 

KXAK, Salt Lake City 

KOIL, Omaha . 1 

KOSA-TV, Odessa. Texas 

KPQ. Wenatchee, Wash. 

KRIZ, Phoenix 97, 

KHON-TV, San Francisco . 

KSAN, San Francisco 

KTSA, San Antonio _.. 

KTVX, Tulsa ...... 

Kl'OA, Siloam Springs, Ark. 

KVWO, Cheyenne 

KWTV, Oklahoma City —.4 



91 

s 
101 
80 
80 
4!t 
103 
84 
94 
12 
99 

23 

'.IS 

9-22 
92 
10 

100 
70 

104 
\s 
89 

105 

103 
0-47 



WAPI-WABT. Birmingham s "> 

WAVK, Louisville 9 

WBAY-TV, Green Bay 102 

WBNS, Columbus. Ohio 83 

WBTV, Charlotte 26 

WBZ-WBZA, Boston ....78-79 

WCAO, Baltimore .. 102 

WCUE, Akron 100 

WDEF-TV. Chattanooga .. 105 

WEHT-TV, Henderson, Ky. 99 

WEMP, Milwaukee _. . ... — 15 

YVKISM, Indianapolis ... IFC 

WHAS-TV. Louisville 63 

WHBQ-TV, .Memphis (5 

WHIO-TV, Dayton .".7 

WIBW-TV. Topeka . 95 

WILK-TV, Wilkes-Barre 98 

WIS-TV, Columbia. S. C. 93 

WJAC-TV, Johnstown. Pa. .. 24 

W.IHL, Johnson City, Tenn. 97 

WKY-TV, Oklahoma City . 63 

WMCT, Memphis 58-59 

WMT, Cedar Rapids 11 

WOLF, Syracuse 96 

WOW-TV, Omaha ... IBC 

WPAL, Charleston, S.C 99 

WPEN. Philadelphia 3 

WREC-TV, Memphis 14 

WRGB, Schenectady si 

WSB, Atlanta 2.". 

WSBT-TV, South Bend, hid 73 

WSKA-TV, Oklahoma City 50 

WSJS, Winston-Salem 103 

VYSKS 94 

WSOK, Nashville 95 

WXEX-TV. Richmond PC 




From Governor to 
Gardening Expert . . . 

sDrue know A etn all I 
The Fabulous "Girl on the Go" 

DRUE SMITH 

Leading CHATTANOOGA RADIO PERSONALITY 
for many years! Drue knows everybody, everywhere, 
and everybody knows . . . and LISTENS to DRUE. 



Limited Participations are avail- 
able. 10:05-10:30 a.m., 2:15- 
2:30 p.m., Monday thru Friday. 




This is a hot tip! 

Ask BRANHAM ! 

D A r\ir\ NBC AFFILIATE IN 
KAUItJ CHATTANOOGA, TENN. 



CARTER M. PARHAM, President 



KEN FLENNIKEN, General Managers 



1 




Hmm,.. 



RURAL MARKET 
AWAITS 
YOUR SALES 
MESSAGE 

AM 

AND 

FM 

5000 Watts 
SILOAM SPRINGS, ARKANSAS 

Northwest Arkansas' 
Most powerful station 



BMI 



Concert Music 

Typical of BMI "service" is 
the complete kit of "Concert 
Music" material used by 
broadcasters daily - . . scripts 
and data which help solve 
many music programming 
needs. 

Included in BMI's Concert 
Mil sir Senirc are: 

CONCERT PIN-UP SHEET— 
\ monthly listing of new re- 
cordings, contemporary and 
standard. 

YOUR CONCERT HALL— \ 
series of half-hour scripts for 
use with phonograph records. 

TODAY IN MUSIC — Dates 
and facts about the important 
mus ic events of the month. 
BMI-Ucensed stations — 
AM, FM and TV— can be 
depended upon for com- 
plete sen ire in music. 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 
TORONTO • MONTREAL 



9 JANUARY 1956 



105 




HAS WON AUDIENCE LEADERSHIP 



IN DES MOINES! 



KRNT-TV sets the pace in the November ARB scoreboard 
for Des Moines. To mention a few Channel 8 leads: 

7 of the top 1 once-a-week evening shows ... 9 of the top 
10 multi-weelcly-show quarter-hours . . . the late-evening 
movies . . . the two afternoon kid shows (reversing national 
trend) . . . the 10 p.m. News every night by far with ratings 
up to 45.3 . . . the 10:20 p.m. Sports . . . and many more. 

KATZ HAS ALL THE FACTS 



mi 



© 



106 



FULL POWER, 316,000 WATTS 



SPONSOR 



K&E bids for 
regional clients 



Multi-market 
film upbeat seen 



ABC TV daytime 
film sale 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 9 January 1956 

(Continued from page 2) 

Trade press story that K&E will open 100 marketing branches this year 
(a revolutionary move, if true) was way off beam. Story reported 
marketing branches offer clinched Pepsi account for K&E, said 
branches would service Pepsi franchised bottlers, would also be 
offered to RCA, Whirlpool, Lincoln, Murcury dealers. Actually K&E 
is far from having Pepsi bottlers sewed up. Germ of truth in story 
lies in fact that K&E is interested in business from Pepsi bottlers 
and other franchised distributors of applaices and autos whose 
national business it handles. Agency feels, trade sources say, that 
such firms offer big poten t ial. Hence, branch offices would natu- 
rally come into picture. However, if K&E opens more than 2 branches 
this year, it will consider itself doing well. 

-SR- 
Syndicators foresee increase in multi-market film buys in 1956. 
Reason, they say, is national, reg i onal advertisers are becoming hep 
on why, wherefores of syndicated film. Local level sales remain, 
however, as bulk of syndication business. Other facts about syndi- 
cation will be found in special section in 23 January issue of 
SPONSOR. Section will include roundup of developments plus facts 
about how to use, how to buy syndicated film. 

-fR- 
First buy on ABC TV's "Afternoon Film Festival" represent s $92,500 
in gross b illings. Client is Best Foods, which bought, via D-F-S, 
39 participations over 13 weeks. A 2-hour weekday strip (3:00-5:00 
p.m.), "Afternoon Film Festival" starts next Monday (16 January). 
Charter clients get bonus. Best Foods actually bought 30 participa- 
tions, got 9 free. Rates for show also provide frequency discounts. 

-SR- 
Impact of ARB's overnight national rating service may be great upon 
agencies, always anxious for quick information on web shows. Those 
interested in speedy data have been using Trendex, but latter covers 
only 15 markets while ARB_samp].e_is rep re s entat ive of ent ire U.S. 
Look for effort by Trendex to meet new challenge. ARB's new serv- 
ice, now offered on special order, was announced dramatically with 
rating on "Babes in Toyland" (NBC TV 24 December). Rating was 35.5. 
Rating base was percent of homes which could receive show, in this 
case 91% of U.S. households. Estimated homes viewing show was 11 
million. ARB will not provide "overnight" on all web tv shows, says 
cost is too high. 

-SR- 
How do you buck your arch competitor on tv when he's sponsor of 
glamorous network show like $64,003 Question?" Max Factor does it 
with spot tv announcements which agency (Doyle Dane Bembach) credits 
with much of firm's 29%_sales volume increase during first full year 
of tv. (For cosmetic maker's newest formula see "Max Factor's 
$64,000 answer: spot tv impact," page 30.) 

-Si- 
Attempt to make commercial blend with show is common (though too 
frequently forgotten about). But Schwerin Research Corp. has docu- 
mented importance of making sure elements withi n pr ograms blend with 
one another. On tv news show, for example, Schwerin found sharp de- 
crease in audience appeal for interview segment when news surround- 
ing it was entirely unrelated. 



Speedy web tv 
ratings offered 



Max 



Spot tv ups 
factor sales 



Show segments 
must blend 



9 |ANUARY 1956 



107 



SPOJVSOR 
SPEAKS 



What changed agencies 

Change is pretty hard to measure. 
Sometimes even harder to say what 
causes it. So it is with agencies. We 
teel it's obvious that agency functions 
have undergone a change. How much 
and what caused it is another matter. 
sponsor has devoted four definitive 
articles to "The Advertising Agency 
in Transition" I see page 27 this is- 
sue). It is our premise that some- 
what radical changes have taken place 
in the traditional agencj function. 
Fair-to-middlin' billings of the middle 
and late Forties have grown into multi- 
million dollar affairs. New titles have 
appeared on agency lineups that are 
far removed from the "copywriter- 
account executive-artist" days of old. 
Marketing has become a word that 
has an agenc) ring along Madison 

\\cnue rather than something that 
the housewife does once a week. 

Vgencj business has become big busi- 



ness and as such is spilling over into 
areas that heretofore have been ex- 
clusivel) management's. 

What caused the change? Was it 
simply a mutation necessary to exist 
in a new environment brought on by 
an unprecedented era in our national 
economy ? Was it simply a normal 
growth pattern that happened to fall 
in this particular period? Did tele- 
vision and its tremendous spending 
lone the change to add new services 
and justify the high dollar being 
charged? Or was it simply a case of 
agency face-saving in view of new- 
found prosperity? 

Mavbe it was one of them, all of 
them. If we had to make a choice 
wed take the one concerning the na- 
tional economy. If the economy was 
the reason, then television was per- 
haps the catalyst. 

Television has somewhat marked 
our economic expansion. Inherently 
it has the vigor, the newness, the elec- 
trify ing quality to sum up change. 
When it burst on the horizon as a 
new medium there was the knowledge 
that it would bring changes. It said. 
I am new. You must make changes 
to accomodate me. 

And so the agencies did just that. 
The model was restyled. brought up 
to date and the new national economy 
became the highway for its debut. It's 
still too early to tell whether the 
change will be accepted quickh . 

With the marketing concept, agen- 
cies have found new 7 stature, one that 
jzives them a greater foothold in the 
economy. One that sa\s thev are busi- 



nessmen, not just cloud-riding expo- 
nents of creativity. This, in our esti- 
mation, can't be anything but good. 

* * •::■ 

Human without corn 

We like the Piel. Bros, radio and 
television commercials so much at 
our house that they are practically a 
part of the day's entertainment. 

In case you haven't been near a 
radio or tv set in the East Coast area 
where Piel's beer is marketed and 
haven't heard the Bob and Ray take- 
off, here's our thumbnail sketch of 
their efforts. The commercials con- 
sist of dialogue between Bob and Ray 
playing the part of the two Piel Bros., 
Harry and Burt. One of the two, we 
can never quite recall which, is an 
introvert, always being shushed by 
his extrovert brother. What the two 
brothers do is fall over each other 
explaining just how good their beer is. 

This is the kind of thing which if 
it's done wrong, oh brother. Bob and 
Ray could have corned up the air to 
the point of a nothing commercial. 

The Piel commercials are equally 
effective in radio and television but 
we find them most inspirational as 
radio commercials. It's unfortunate 
that in radio programing today the 
dramatic form, whether it be serious 
or humorous, has practically van- 
ished. But with the Piel Bros, com- 
mercials Y&R's copy staff have 
brought back to radio a form of one- 
minute drama in which the listener 
gets a chance to let imagination paint 
a picture of the two sponsors and 
their cherished product. 



Applause 



Quiet yet profitable 

1 he big new s among cosmetics ad- 
vertisers in 1955 was Revlon's phe- 
nomenal success with The $64,000 
Ouestion. It captured the attention of 
viewers and. what's more difficult to 
do. it amazed the advertising frater- 
nity with its rise out of nowhere. 
^ ou'd almost think, reading the thou- 
sands of words which have been writ- 
ten about Revlon in the consumer and 
trade press, that nobody else in the 
cosmetics industry was getting anv- 
yvhere in television. 

\mong the cosmetics companies 
which has rated lowest in the pub- 
licity sweepstakes this vear is Max 



Factor. We cant recall a single con- 
versation with anyone in advertising 
circles on the job they're doing. Yet 
Max Factor in 1955, its first full year 
in television, will record at least a 
29' < increase in sales — the biggest 
increase in the company s history. 
The reason Max Factor virtually es- 
caped trade notice while doing itself 
this much good is just that it used 
spot television rather than a well 
known network show. 

We think yvhat happened to Max 
Factor is more representative of the 
way advertising works than what hap- 
pened to Revlon. Factor's success is 
based simply on seeking wide circu- 
lation yyith arresting commercials and 



pounding away steadily. Factor, like 
most advertisers, did not have a pro- 
gram which was on the lips of con- 
sumers and dealers. All it has was 
the poyver to create sales which it and 
its agencv . Doyle Dane Bernbach, at- 
tained through ingenious commercials. 
There will always be advertisers 
wise and fortunate enough to buy the 
programs which suddenly spring to 
the top of the ratings chart. But, what 
is more important, there will also 
always be adveritsers who make 
skilled use of workmanlike techniques 
and achieve cash register success with 
only an occasional bit of notice such 
as this. I See also article this issue on 
Max Factor, page 30. ) 



108 



SPONSOR 



IV BUYERS 





OUTLET 



in 



OMAHA 



IS 



WOW-TV 

Frank P. Fogarty, Vice President and General Manager 

channel / ^\ 






L=sd Li* 



We suggest that you check your availabili- 
ties and adjacencies in the Omaha market 
TODAY with Blair-TV or Fred Ebener, 
WOW-TV. 



L<c6&ftf 



MEREDITH Radio **td 7de«M*« STATIONS 

affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens and Successful Farming magazines 

SYRACUSE 

WW 




JOHN BLAIR 1 CO. HAIR TV, INC. 




V* 







we announce our 
change in names 



from 



Adam T Young, It., l**r 



ADAM YOUNG, INC. 

I Zi o Station Representation 



from 



Adam ^""" Television 



Corp 



' 



YOUNG 



TELEVISION, CORP- 

Representation 



• No change in our personnel, our address, or in our concentrated 
representation of no more than 20 top stations. 



Chicago • St. Louis • San Francisco • Los Angeles • Boston 
477 Madison Avenue, New York 



- : - 5 6 



t D ||/ 4 ,j Q 

n s c - « n : , s T £ G y « „ 

N y 




p advertisers use 




1049 Ft 




that's the maximum tower height 
in the rich market off 

RICHMOND 

Petersburg and Central Virginia 

The tower of WXEX-TV is 1049 ft. above sea level— and 943 ft. 
above average terrain . . . more than 100 ft. higher than any station 
in this market. In addition, WXEX-TV has maximum power— 316 
KW. It is the basic NBC-TV station; and there are 415,835 TV 
families in its coverage area. See your Forjoe man for full details 
about this great buy. 

WXEX-TV 

Tom Tinsley, President Irvin G. Abeloff, Vice President 

Represented by Forjoe & Co. 



23 JANUARY 1956 



50* per copy* $ 8 per year 



TV FILM: 1956 
SPECIAL REPORT 

page 29 



How to be a success 
and suffer. Headaches 
of tv station managers 

page 36 



■ I 




Your products 
be color blind 






page 34 




Must a retailer stick 
to saturation radio? 

page 38 

M0SLER: PRINT 
TO SPOT RADIO 



» 

cai 
bu 



ese program trent 
can change your 
buying habits 

page 40 



Marketing glossar 
provides additions 
adman's vocabulary 



page 42 




All ratings confirm that 
the one dominant station 
in Indianapolis is 

WISH-TV 




Film distribs 
see big 1956 



Revlon switch 
due to marketing? 



NBC woos dept. 
store dollars 



It looks as if film distri butors will h av e $100 million yea r in 1956. 
This is SPONSOR'S estimate for its annual film section, appearing 
in this issue. Figure represents 25% jump over 1955. Particularly 
healthy jump is expected in feature film sales. Last year, early part 
of this year saw release to tv of 1,000-plus features, 300-plus 
Westerns, about 4,000 shorts. Syndicators with half-hour shows say 
they don't expect too much competition from Hollywood product, 
explain it's hard to clear time for long features outside periods 
already allocated. 

-SR- 
Confusion reigns and everyone's wondering what's what in switch of 
Revlon from Norman, Craig & Kummel to BBDO. Much talk that Revlon 
too k long l ook at BBD O' s m ark etin g setup, de c ided to ma k e swi t ch. 
It's known fact that "$64,000 Question" worked sales miracles for 
Revlon. Question is: Was Norman, Craig & Kummel in position to offer 
best merchandising support to burgeoning account? BBDO, like other 
top agencies, is long on marketing (SPONSOR, 12 December 1955) with 
top merchandising specialists available to Revlon. Marketing played 
key role, according to BBDO insider. More and more account switch- 
ing for this reason believed to be in offing. 

-SR- 
NBC TV pulled out all stops on department store pitch at 45th annual 
convention of National Retail Dry Goods Association this month. 
Department store ad dollars are target for new program effort on 
net's & O's to make debut on 13 February. Idea of program, "Win- 
dow," is to slot department store pitches in 5-minute periods through- 
out day. Generally agreed presentation was superior, will do much 
good in breaking down barrier. Many felt it still didn't answer pri- 
mary question: How to sell buyers who make department stores tick. 
Top brass buy tv but merchandising heads have tendency to stick with 
print, won't risk going heavily into new medium until absolutely 
proven it can do job. NBC TV success might be breaking-point. 

-SR- 
CBS Television became first network to subscribe to NCS No. 2. Oscar 
Katz, CBS TV director of research stated that data has long been 
need ed in st at ion coverage and circulation re search, especially be- 
cause of tv station and set increases since the "freeze." 

-SR- 
Slenderella International, world's largest figure proportioning salon 
chain, will spen d "well ov er $1 mill ion in sp ot radio in_1956 . " 
Chain which started with 5 outlets in 1950 (SPONSOR, 21 February 
1955) now has more than 100 and is presently adding at a 7 to 8 a week 
clip. Firm will purchase 619 announcements weekly on 72 stations in 
21 markets and will sponsor 16 local programs. Total radio only 
budget for '56 is $1,193,683.92. There also will be sizeable budget 
for tv, print. Agency: Management Associates of Connecticut, Inc. 

I- I 



CBS TV orders 
NCS No. 2 



Big radio buy 
for Slenderella 



SPONSOR, Volume in. No 2 
York. 17. Printed at 3110 Elm 



23 Jl irj 1956 Published blweeklj bs SPONSOR Publications, Inc. Executive. Editorial. Advertising. Circulation Offices, 40 E. 49th St.. New 

Ave.. Baltimore. Md $8 a year in V S S9 elsewhere Entered as second class matter 29 .Ian. 1948 at Baltimore nnst.ifnVe under Act of 3 Mar 1R7S 






Radio, tv not 
Siamese twins 



Spot tv dollar 
data out soon 



REPORT TO SPONSOR for 23 January 1956 

Film freeze Another sign this will be big year for sale of feature films to tv 
ending contained in Republic's decision to release 76 features, some with 

stars like John Wayne, Susan Hayward, Gail Russell. Republic had not 
been planning step but decided on immediate release to get in before 
market is glutted. Total production cost of 76 films ran to over 
$40,000,000. You can look for mora snowballing in release of fea- 
tures as studios rush to keep up with RK0 and Columbia. 

-SR- 
Kevin Sweeney, president of RAB, took a fast cut at broadcasters and 
ad agencies for considering radio and tv "Siamese Twins." Sweeney 
in a Philadelphia speech said broadcasters and agencymen continue 
to confu s e "two diam et rically different advertising media and in 
doing so cost radio several hundred million dollars annually. " Swee- 
ney further charged that 2 of top 10 agencies "have a basic fixed 
position that excludes radio from their thinking." He said some 
broadcasters were openly wondering "why should we bother to pay 15% 
to these agencies where the very existence of radio as a national 
advertising medium is challenged." 

-SR- 
TvB release of Rorabaugh data on spot tv dollar expenditures will be 
out in month or so. Data, covering last quarter 1955, will contain: 
(1) total spot tv spending, (2) total spending, brand breakdowns by 
leading advertisers, (3) breakdown by product categories. First 
report will be only on e with quarterly brand figures. Henceforth, 
such data will appear only on annual basis. Not available to adver- 
tisers in released data are market-by-market info, breakdowns of 
client spending by type of purchase, time of day, etc. N. C. Rora- 
baugh is banking on agencies to pay for unreleased data since he is 
supplying facts to TvB at cost. 

-SR- 
Commercial multiplex service was inaugurated by WFLY, Troy, N.Y., 
weekend of 15 January. One or more programs of a special type may 
b e transmitted simultaneously to restaurants, hotels, and other sub- 
scribers, without interfering with regular programs. 

-SR- 
Michael J. Foster, veteran press relations manager at CBS TV, becomes 
v.p. in charge of press information and advertising at ABC 30 Janu- 
ary. It's first time ABC has had v.p. in this slot. ABC also elected 
3 executives to v.p. rank: Robert F. Lewine, v.p. and director of tv 
program dept. ; James A. Stabile, v.p. and director business affairs 
dept. ; Mortimer Weinbach, v.p. and director labor relations and 
personnel. 

-SR- 
Unrest's still brewing in the beer industry. Three weeks ago Schlitz 
left Lennen & Newell for Biow. Move reawakened talk of rivalry be- 
tween cousins Adolph Toigo, president and 100% owner L&N and John 
Toigo, executive v.p. of Biow over $10 million beer account. Biow 
resigned Ruppert Brewing Co. to accommodate Schlitz. At SPONSOR'S 
press time, Biow announced resigning Schlitz. Account is rumored to 
be going to McCann-Erickson with John Toigo. Ruppert, a $2 million 
account, has not announced its new agency appointment. 

(Sponsor Reports continues page 139) 
• I 



FM subscriber 
service 



Mike Foster 
to ABC as v.p. 



ISchlitz leaves Biow 
for McCann? 



SPONSOR 




sales results in 

the Channel 8 Multi-City Market 

WGAL-TV 

LANCASTER, PENNA. NBC and CBS 

Yes, this large multi-city region is espe- 
cially noted for the sales results it delivers 
—sales results which are the result of 
these three outstanding facts. Its 3H 
million people own 912,950 TV sets and 
have a yearly potential buying capacity 
of $5M billion. 

STEINMAN STATION 
Clair McCollough, Pres. 




ftepresenfaf/ves; 

MEEKER TV, INC. 

New York Let Angel** 



Chicago 



San Francisco 



23 JANUARY 1956 



the magazine radio and tv I 



dvertisers use 



23 January 1956 
Volume 10 Number 2 



ARTICLES 



Film's $100 million year 

Syndicated film gross expected to top 1955 by 25%. Big current question: 
How will the present flood of movies affect syndication? 

Spot radio gives /Hosier right combination 

The Mosler Safe Company found the right combination: Dragnet-type spot 
radio effort supplements print advertising, softens markets 

Are your products color blind? 

WDSU-TV's Color Clinic diagnoses client and agency color ills. Remedies 
prescribed perk up color telecasting for clients' products 

Nun- to be a success and suffer 

Seller's market brings new headaches to tv station manager with client and 
agency demands running far in front of time availabilities 

Must a retailer stick to saturation radio? 

Von's, a Los Angeles supermarket chain, turns the tables on standard satura- 
tion campaigns with a daily five-minute consumer news show. Company that 
spends only $6,000 per year registers sales gains of 30% 

Will these 19 program trends change buying? 

Based on a SPONSOR survey of U.S. radio and television stations, this series 
of charts indicates key shifts in programing emphasis 

The jargon of marketing 

To help make it easier for the advertising man to keep updated on current 
marketing jargon, SPONSOR has compiled list of latest usages 

J 956 TV FILM SECTION 



Things you must know to buy syndicated film 

Here are facts on programs, pricing, clearances, merchandising, ratings, and 
the syndicated film buyer who must know all about them 

14 questions admen ask before buying 

From admen and syndicators come answers to 14 basic and most frequent 
questions on film buying. They're designed as a checklist for you 

What atlmen tvant front film syndicators 

Product's good, plentiful, agencymen say, but availabilities, film pricing, in- 
adequate promotion and research make their buying job hard 

4 multi-market film case histories 

Their station lineups range from six markets to 44, but each advertiser got 
low-cost identification, top programing dealer retailer support 

Film facts and figures 

Want to know how many stations air syndicated film? Where there's room 
for more syndicated film on the air? You'll find answers here 



32 



34 



36 



38 



40 



42 



44 



40 



51 



52 



56 




AGENCY AD LIBS 

AGENCY PROFILE, Dr. W. Wulfeck 1 

FILM CHART 

FILM TRENDS 

49TH & MADISON 

MR. SPONSOR Norman C. Owen .... 

NEW & RENEW 

NEW TV STATIONS 

NEWSMAKERS 

P.S. . 

RADIO COMPARAGRAPH 

ROUNDUP 

SPONSOR ASKS 
SPONSOR BACKSTAGE 
SPONSOR SPEAKS 
TIMEBUYERS 



Editor and President: Norman R. Glenn 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Glenr 

Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bernard P 

Vice Pres.-Adv. Dir.: Charles W. Godwin 

Executive Editor: Miles David 

Editorial Director: James E. Allen 

Senior Editors: Alfred J. Jaffe. Alvin Hat- 
Evelyn Konrad 

Assistant Editor: Ed Feldmann 

Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman, Joe C» 

Editorial Assistants: Morton C. Kahn, Lois 

Morse 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Lester Cole 

Advertising Department: Arnold Alport, 
sistant Advertising Manager; Edwin 
Cooper, Western Manager; John A. Kovcr 
Production Manager; Charles L. N* 
George Becker, Jean Engel 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Setz, S 
scription Manager; Emily Cutillo, Mine 

Mitchell, Dorothy O'Brien 

Office Manager: Catherine Scott Rose 

Readers' Service: Augusta B Shearman 

Accounting Department: Laura Oken. Lai 
Fazio 

Secretary to Publisher: Helen L. Hanes 



COMING 



Can Armstrong buck the 864,000 Question? 

Lancaster Pa., cork company is after more than just high ratings. Article will 
tell how firm uses network tv show to dovetail with print campaign, effect over- 
all media effort against tv's number one program 



6 Feb. 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS !► 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial Circulation, 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49th & Madl( 
New York 17, N. Y. Telephone: MUrray Hill *-T 
Chicago Office: 161 B. Grand Ave. Phone: SUpe 
7-9863 Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boulevi 
Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Dallas Office: 311 8. Ai 
St. Phone STerling 3591 Printing Office: 8110 1 
Ave., Baltimore 11. Md Subsci lptlons : United Bti 
$8 a year. Canada and foreign $9. Single copies I 
Printed in U.S.A. Address all correspondence to 
E. 49th St.. New York 17. N. Y. MUrray H1U i-T 
Copyright 1955 SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS INC 




KWKH 



SHREVEPORT 



Even Gets Into FOREST! 



CWKH really beats the bushes to bring you this area's 
best daytime audience. And does it, too — 
reaching thousands of farms, hundreds of 
towns and settlements like Forest (La.) in our 
80-county SAMS area. 

But all these "trees" don't keep us from seeing the main 
stem. Latest Hoopers for Metropolitan Shreve- 
port show KWKH preferred over the second 
station morning, noon and night — up to 
104%! 

In listener s-per-dollar , KWKH tops the second-best sta- 
tion by 89.4%. Get all the facts from The 
Branham Company. 




KWKH 

A Shreveport Times Station 
I TEXAS 



SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



Noarly 2 million people live within the KWKH day- 
time SAMS area. (Area includes additional counties 
In Texas. Oklahoma and New Mexico not shown in map). 



50,000 Watts • CBS Radio 



ARKANSAS 



The Branham Co. 
Ponr^sentatives 



Henry Clay 
General Manaqer 



Fred Watkins 
Commercial Manager 



CASE HISTORY — SOFT GOODS 





JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, California 
Telephone: HOIIywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker & Assoc Inc. 



Retailer 100 Miles Away 
Finds KBIG Spots Pay Off 

Kelly-Bilt Clothes, a single-store men's clothier 
in Oceanside, San Diego County, two years 
ago tested high-power regional radio with a 
few spots on KEIG Catalina — a station one 
hundred miles away! 

Enthused by results , Kelly last year used 675 
announcements to promote specific sales 
events on KBIG. This year he's on a 1000-spot 
master contract. 

Writes Cal Lawrence, account executive of 
The Dan Lawrence Company advertising 
agency of San Diego: 

"We are most happy to report on the over- 
whelming success of the schedule. Response 
has been immediate and from all over Cali- 
fornia. Within 24 hours after the first spots, 
telegrams with orders for merchandise were 
received. Foot traffic and mail orders have 
eome rushing in, most of the latter accom- 
panied by checks and money orders. 

"Count us a very happy agency with a very 
happy client." 

In the Los Angeles metropolitan market and 
its environs, KBIG's "music you like and just 
enough news" delivers feminine customers, 
too, to such soft-goods advertisers as Sally 
Shops, House of Nine and Mode O'Day. 

Hard, soft or medium, KBIG will be happy to 
tailor a k-BIG garment to your measurements. 




a 







Marie Coleman, Donahue & Coe, New York, 
stresses that timebuyers are salesmen. Their job 
isn't finished when schedules are on the air. "We 
feel that every buy must be insured through thorough 
merchandising," she explains. "Take advertising 
for feature films as an example, though it applies 
to any product. We make sure that stations co- 
operate with us by mentioning the sponsor's prod- 
uct {film titles, in this case) on circulars they send 
out. We supply press books to local announcers to 
give them more information about the films to in- 
sure convincing messages and other possible air 
mentions. But in buying time for any product, the 
buyer must follow through in asking for and 
supervising merchandising." 



V'al Hitter, N. W. Ayer, New York, says that a 
good buy is almost inevitably judged on ratings, but 
good buyers consider a number of less clear-cut 
criteria. "A program dictates the atmosphere in 
which a commercial is viewed or heard. Therefore 
a buyer must consider not only the time period that 
will reach a maximum number of potential users for 
the client's product, but also the tone and appeal of 
the commercial and whether it will get the greatest 
carry-over from the program it's in or adjacent to. 
These are values that can't be decided mathe- 
matically. The good timebuyer, therefore, needs to 
be able to judge programing content beyond show 
ratings. For example, the same program might 
attract different types of audiences in different 
types of markets." 



Louis J. Kennedy, Kenyon & Eckhardt, New 
York, says that knowledge of the client's product 
and good briefings from the account executive are 
a sound start to good time buying. "But it still 
helps the buyer a great deal if he has a chance to 
see film commercials or hear e.t.'s before placing 
them," he adds. "All too often things come up to 
prevent a previous screening: late production dead- 
lines or the fact that the buyer's imbroiled in too 
much work. There's some tendency, therefore, for 
buyers to choose local personalities more care- 
fully than adjacencies for film commercials. Yet 
more thought should be given to the fact that 
a campaign is most efficient when commercials are 
in tune with the show they're near or in." 



SPONSOR 



Here's a champion performance to warm any advertiser's 
blood against Winter's onset. The team includes 
the Ashland Oil & Refining Company. 69,550 football 
contest entries, and a remarkably persuasive medium 
called WSAZ-TV. To kick off, let's ask: "What does any 
advertiser want most when he advertises?" 

action < 

You bet ! So listen to this ! Ashland Oil 

picked WSAZ-TV (and only WSAZ-TV) last Fall 

to promote a contest during the Cleveland * 

Browns televised pro games. Prizes: 

32 trips by air to see the Browns tangle 

with the Pittsburgh Steelers in 

Cleveland on November 20. 

For entry blanks, viewers were asked 
to visit an Ashland Oil outlet. No 
strings attached. Fast as you can say 
"buck-lateral," Ashland dealers in 
four states were hustling like 
happy halfbacks to supply blanks. 

After seven weeks, when the final 
whistle blew, 69,550 entries had been 
received — almost enough to pack 
Cleveland's Municipal Stadium ! From them 
32 winners were drawn before WSAZ-TV 
cameras at half-time intermissions of the Browns 
games. While thousands-&-thousands watched ! 

Another example of how WSAZ-TV gets action 
in this five-state industrial market with four 
billion buying power, nearly half-a million 
TV homes! What's more, WSAZ-TV is the one 
medium covering the whole area. Ask your Katz 
man to get you into 



Huntington- 
Charleston, 
West Virginia 

CHANNEL S 

Maximum Power 

NBC BASIC NETWORK 

affiliated with ABC 



12 



^> 



the game, too. 



^ 



^ 




WSAZ 



TE LEVISION 

also affiliated with Radio Stations WSAZ, 

Huntington & WGKV. Charleston 

Lawrence H. Rogers. Vice President and 

General Manager, WSAZ. Inc. 

represented nationally bv The Katz Agency 




23 JANUARY 1956 



the Gill 



the Time 

Daytime: the active hours when the world's work is 
being done; when things are made and moved and 
bought and sold; when factories hum and stores are 
jammed; when human needs are filled and the practical 
business of life goes on. 



And this is who's behind it all, behind the making 
moving, and buying and selling; behind the house t 
Jack built and the things that fill it. It is she \ 
decides and provides the food and clothes and furnit 
and stoves and refrigerators. She spends over $; 
million a day on food and drugs alone. What with co 
ing and cleaning and buying and fixing she happen: 
be just about the busiest person in the world; alw; 
on the move. For advertisers the trick is to keep up w 
her, and nothing does this so well as radio. Radk 
with her all day long, wherever she goes, from room 
room, from house to car, from car to house, in over 
million homes throughout the country. 







the Place 



The one place on radio you'll find her most of the time 
is the network with ten out of the ten most popular day- 
time programs. It's the same place you'll find the lead- 
ing advertisers, too. This month seven new big ones 
joined the ranks— Campbell Soup, Chesebrough-Pond's, 
Easy Washing Machine, Pharmaco, Philip Morris, 
Standard Brands, Sunsweet Prunes; while four old 
faithfuls— Bristol-Myers, Campana, Hazel Bishop and 
Lever Brothers added to their daytime schedules— all 
on the nation's Number 1 Radio Network. . . 




the CBS 

Radio 
Network 




KSTP is there "when it happens... 



. . . and within minutes, the entire Northwest 
knows the whole story! By their expert use of 
five 2-way-radio news cars, a news plane, tape 
and telephone recorders and other facilities, 
KSTP reporters and news-men consistently lead 
all competitors in fast, accurate presentation 
of the news. 

One of the first full-time radio newsrooms in 
the nation, KSTP employs 19 experienced re- 
porters, 100 "stringer" reporters in a 5-state 
area whose job is to report the news quickly, 
completely, impartially and in good taste. 

Within the last few months, KSTP again 
scooped all competitors — including newspapers 
— with an exclusive story on a kidnap-murder 
victim which was carried on national news serv- 
ice wires. This, incidentally, is the third time 
that KSTP has scored a news beat of national 



importance. Several national and local awards 
for news coverage and presentation also attest 
to the excellence of this pioneering news oper- 
ation. 

In addition to its superior daily news pro- 
grams, KSTP offers its listeners varied enter- 
tainment 24 hours a day! The Northwest's 
favorite personalities offer the "best music in 
town," plus sports, weather news and other 
popular shows. 

Why not put KSTP with its top personalities, 
balanced programming and unmatched news 
coverage to work for you? To 
sell the vital Northwest 
market, your best buy is 
KSTP . . . priced and 
programmed to serve 
today's radio needs! 



KSTP K*^ 




MINNEAPOLIS 

'PRICED and PROGRAMMED" to serve today's radio needs! 

EDWARD PETRY & CO., INC. • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



10 



SPONSOR 




by Bob Foreman 

High tv ratings van be a worry too 

Had the phrase "familiarity breeds contempt" not become 
a cliche long before television it might well have been coined 
expressly for the medium. Seldom has the familiar been held 
in such contempt as takes place all too often in tv. What 
has happened to the comics who were No. 1 a year or two 
back? What Ex-Number One melodrama is fighting for its 
life today? Where are the situation shows that were the talk 
of every tv home only yesterday? 

This subject — the staying power of a tv show — is of course 
of vital interest to just about everyone involved in the busi- 
ness, for by anticipating loss of favor it can often be staved 
off a season or two or the whole opus can be dropped for a 
new property before the roof falls in. 

Wearability is a factor as far as commercials go — and 
some go farther than others. The advertiser must attempt to 
sense when his commercial will have run too often and either 
alter it or yank it completely because the commercial that has 
overstayed its welcome may do actual harm to a product. 

There are reasons why a program falls from grace. So 
many in fact. Obviously, there can be no rule of thumb which 
will enable advertisers, agencies, networks or packagers to 
tell just how long they have before the crowd will turn away. 

The time spot, its competition, the caliber of the writing 
( Please turn to page 112) 

Foreman says Dragnet rating drop made Webb add romance, Marjie Miller, right 







AGAIN 



No.1 
Independent 

IN DENVER 
AND COLORADO! 



According 

to an impartial 

Pulse survey instituted by 

the majority oi Denver radio 

stations, KTLN again 

delivers more listeners for 

your advertising dollar than 

any other Denver or 

Colorado radio station. 




"Call Me in New York" 

I'm Peggy Stone 

at Radio 

Representatives, Inc., 

MUrray Hill 8-4340 — 

or call Lee Mehlig in 

Denver, AComa 2-4811 — 

for the complete 

KTLN story. 



TL 



Denver's 24-hour Voice 
of Music — Colorado's 
Most Powerful, Most 
Listened-to Radio Station 



23 JANUARY 1956 



11 



*\v\- 



tW 



o^ 



s o^ 



% 



>/ 



<te 



MOV 



c* 



o* 



N^ 



1& 



sc 



ytf 



,** 



KABC, KAVL, KBIG, KBIS, KFAC, 

KFI, KFWB, KFXM, KGER, KGFJ, % 

KIEV, KMPC, KNX, KOWL, KPOL, 

KPOP, KRKD, KWKW, KWSO are proud to announce that Frank Crane 
and his all-star cast of voices are visiting San Francisco. 



\K 



A* 



S v 



S* 




FRANK CRANE 

president of The Southern 
California Broadcasters 
Association has a new 
approach to an 
important story. 



On Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday; January 30th 

and 31st and February 1st, the S.C.B.A. 
is bringing the world's first Ultra-Phonic 

Sound Presentation, "Unusual Radio Markets,' 
to the Bay area. 



RADIO-TV DAILY said, "...". eye and ear compelling. . . ." 

SPONSOR said, ". . . . unusual in conception and presentation . . . one of the most effective in radio history. 
The entertaining and interesting new way in which this presentation is made has brought many comments 
on its usefulness from those who have seen it. 

ADVERTISERS AND AGENCIES ARE INVITED TO ATTEND-— AT STUDIO A, 
KCBS, SHERATON-PALACE HOTEL— AT 10:30 AM OR 4:00 PM EACH DAY. 
FOR RESERVATIONS CALL JIM ALSPAUGH AT YUKON 2-5701. 



- 



% 



%\ 



KAVR in Apple Valley; KBIG in Avalon; KAFY, KBIS, KGEE, KPMC in Bakersfield; 
KWTC in Barstow; KBLA in Burbank; KBUC in Corona; KXO in El Centro; KIEV in 
Glendale; KAVL in Lancaster; KFOX, KGER in Long Beach; KABC, KFAC, KFI, KFWB, 
KGFJ, KHJ, KLAC, KMPC, KNX, KPOL. KPOP, KRKD, ABC Network, CBS Network, 
NBC Network in Los Angeles; KOCS in Ontario; KOXR in Oxnard; KCMJ in Palm Springs; 
KALI, KWKW, KXLA in Pasadena; KCAL in Rsdlands; KCSB, KFXM, KITO, KRNO in 
San Bernardino, KGIL in San Fernando; KVEC in San Luis Obispo; KWIZ in Santa 
Ana; KDB, KIST in Santa Barbara; KCOY, KSMA in Santa Maria; KOWL in 
Santa Monica; KVEN in Ventura, KWSO in Wasco. 



PONCHO 



4* 



/ 



THE SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BROADCASTERS ASSOCIATION 



r ty 



Ate 



•% 



e tiA/i~ 






/] 



irw MAOISM 

sponsor invites letters to the editor. 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 

BACKSTAGE BOBBLE 

Joe Csida's "Sponsor Backstage" in 
your December 12. 1955 issue, which 
was otherwise excellent, was in error 
in using our registered trade mark 
"Lp" in the generic form of LP de- 
scribing any long playing record. 

The letters "LP" should be used only 
in connection with Columbia long play- 
ing records, and when so used, only 
in the following manner: 

Columbia "Lp" Long-Playing rec- 
ord. 

This should either be followed by or 
referenced to a footnote: (Lp trade- 
mark reg. U.S. Pat. Off. I 

We should appreciate your coopera- 
tion in the future in protecting our 
valuable property right in this trade 
mark and in informing your readers 
that the article in question improperly 
used "LP" as explained in this letter. 
Milton R. Neaman 
Senior Attorney 
Columbia Broadcasting 

System, Inc. 
New York, N. Y. 

• SPONSOR apologizes for ihe error and happy 
to oblige. 



TOOTHPASTE FAN 

"The wife wonders where the tooth- 
paste went 
Cause I switched my clan to Pepso- 
dent." 
I trust the authors of this jingle will 
forgive my changing their lines a lit- 
tle. But I couldn't help dancing a jig 
when I read your story on that Pepso- 
dent Radio Budget. 

I hope all advertisers keep an eye on 
this campaign. Maybe radio isn't as 
glamorous as our visual buddies, but 
we can sell merchandise. 

By the way, my station has not been 
bought so this is not a personal expres- 
sion of gratitude. 

Bill Hart 

Station Manager 

KGHI 

Little Rock, Ark. 



MARKETING STUDY 

I have read with absorbing interest 
the installments of vour Marketing and 




T Television commercials represent creative 
energy expended during countless man-hours 
of hard work. 

To let the slightest element in their presentation 
go wrong is a waste of talent, time and adver- 
tising dollars. 

That is why WBEN-TV "guides your com- 
mercials" from copy checking to control-room 
shading . . . from him room to studio floor. 
And no television station in Western New York 
is better equipped for this important job. Pio- 
neer since 1948, WBEN-TV has developed 
skills and techniques to the point of perfection 
that counts most when "you're on the air." 
You buy "QUALITY" when you buy WBEN- 
TV — and it costs you no more. In considering 
your next TV move in the Buffalo market, con- 
sider — first — WBEN-TV. 

Your TV dollars count for more on CHANNEL 4. 



WBEN ^TV 



WBEN-TV DELIVERS 

Western New York is the 
second richest market in 
America's richest State. And 
— WBEN-TV delivers this 
market as does no other 
television station. 



CBS NETWORK 



BUFFALO, N. Y. 



WBINTV 1 

Representative T 



Harrington, (lighter and Parsons. Inc., 
New York, Chicago, San Francisco 



23 JANUARY 1956 



13 




A 



- 



nd what do YOU want 
from a Musical Clock? 

The same thing my Central New York 
listeners want: 

GOOD MUSIC — TIME — WEATHER REPORTS — 

NEWS AND LOCAL FLAVOR 

But you want more . . . SALES RESULTS! 

That's what I offer on WFBL's Musical Clock. 

Mon. thru Sat., 7 to 9:30 a.m. 

It got RESULTS for 144 advertisers in 1955 
FORWARD '56! 

Am I better than other morning men? Certainly! 
Just place your message on my show and watch the 
sales rise. See Free $c Peters. 

Best wishes, 




Merchandising study from the point of 
view of both agency and client, under 
Ben Bodec's byline. 

These articles are excellent and a 
lot of interviewing and leg work must 
have been done to obtain the informa- 
tion which you so ably prepared. 

After you have reprinted the series, 
I would like to have 10 or 12 sets, if 
possible, to circulate within our or- 
ganization. 

William L. Young 

Vice President 

Marketing & Merclwndising 

William Esty Company, Inc. 

New York, N. Y. 

• Reader Young is referring to articles pub- 
lished in the 31 Oct. 1955, 12 Dec. 1955, 26 
Dec. 1955, and 9 Jan. 1956 issues of SPONSOR. 
Reprinting will depend on volume of reader re- 
quests. 



FARM DATA 

An individual employed in a mid- 
west advertising agency wrote me re- 
cently with respect to some statistics on 
farm radio. In search for the answers, 
I wrote Frank Atwood who recently re- 
tired as president of NATRFD. He 
thought the best source of information 
would be sponsor. 

The questions asked dealt with lis- 
tening preferences of farmers. . . . 

Since Frank's reference is very gen- 
eral. I wonder if there is a specific is- 
sue of your magazine which covered 
this subject or whether it is contained 
in several different issues. 

Hollis M. Seavey 

Director 

Clear Channel 

Broadcasting Service 

Washington, D. C. 

• SPONSOR'S 4th annual Farm Issue was pub- 
lished 31 Oet. 1955. Copies are available. 



Central New York's FIRST Radio Station 



TIMEBUYERS' GUIDE 

Thank you for your "Timebuyers of 
the U.S." I'm sure this took a lot of 
hard work to compile and I know we 
can use it to great advantage. 

Harold C. Lund 
Vice President 
KDKA-TV 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Thanks for the two copies of your 
fine list of "Timebuyers of the U. S.' 
I think this is a great job and one that 
will be extremely helpful to all stations. 
Could vou send me three additional 



copies : 



Ralph W. Nimmons 
Manager 
WFAA-TV 
Dallas, Texas 



14 



SPONSOR. 



IN INLAND CALIFORNIA iand western nevadai 




RADIO 







These inland radio stations, purchased as a unit, give you 
more listeners than any competitive combination of local 
stations . . . and at the lowest cost per thousand! (SAMS 
and SR&D) 

In this inland market — ringed by mountains — the Bee- 
line covers an area with over 2 million people, more buy- 
ing power than Colorado, more farm income than Kansas. 
(Sales Management's 1955 Copyrighted Survey) 



tULcCAaJbcJUq &fijoadccisti*Aq C*nf*Jfpoj*A\ 

SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA • Paul H. Raymer Co., National Representative 
23 JANUARY 1956 



15 




"What's the Kansas City area story?" 

"Let's ask Pulse and Nielsen!" ^ 



of course! 





Dominates 
Its Area, Too! 



•lAYlOt UnCCOlTlOfCMur *»Y™ | 




70-County 

AREA PULSE 

620,400 radio homes 
WHB is first in every time period! 
Average share of audience 25% ahead 
of the second station! 



N. S. I. AREA 

542.700 radio homes 
WHB all-day average: 42.9% 
(second station: 16.6%) 

WHB first by far in every time period! 



'-- 1 •—■La 



Latest Kansas City Hooper gives WHB whopping 
first place with 47.7%. So WHB dominates the 
metropolitan area as it dominates the whole area. 
More reason than ever to talk to the man from 



Blair, or WHB General 
Armstrong ! 



lanager 



George W. 



weiii 



10,000 watts — 710 kc 



m 



-CONTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 



President: Todd Storz 



KOWH, Omaha 
Represented by 
H-R Reps., Inc. 



WTIX, New Orleans 

Represented by 

Adam J. Young, Jr. 



WHB, Kansas City 

Represented by 

John Blair & Co. 



16 



SPONSOR 



New and renew 




23 JANUARY 1956 



1. New on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



Hazel Bishop, NY _ Raymond Spector 

Best Foods, NY ...D-F-S, NY 



Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City Ted Bates, NY 

Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City William Esty, NY 

Dixie Cup, Easton, Pa 



Clamorene, NY 

Lewis Howe, St. Louis, for Turns 
Maybelline Co, Chi 



W. A. Sheaffer Pen Co, Ft. Madison, Iowa 

Swiff & Co, Chi 

Time, Inc, NY _ 

Toni Co, Chi 



Ton; Co, Chi 



NY CBS 78 Gary Moore; alt Th 10-10:15 am; 5 Jan; 52 wks 

_ ABC - -...Afternoon Film Festival; M-F 3-5 pm; 1 Jan; 

13 wks 

ABC — ...Famous Film Festival; S 7:30-9 pm; 1 Jan; 13 wks 

CBS 136 Crusader; alt F 9-9:30 pm; 13 Jan; 52 wks 

. NBC _. Queen for a Day; alt Th 4:30-4:45 pm; 16 Feb; 

26 wks 

ABC -Famous Film Festival; S 7:30-9 pm; 5 Feb; 26 wks 

ABC ."amous Film Festival; S 7:£0-9 pm; 15 Jan; 4 wks 

CBS 125 Jack Parr; M 1:15-1:30; 26 Dec; 

Robert Q. Lewis; M 2-2:15 pm; 26 Dec 

Russel M. Seeds, Chi CBS 57 Robert Q. Lewis; M 2-2:15 pm; 9 and 16 Jan 

McCann-Erickson, NY _ NBC 70 Tennessee Ernie; M 12:15-12:30; 23 Jan; 26 wks 

Y&R, NY ABC --._._ John Daly and news; Th 7:15-7:30; 5 Jan 

North Adv, Chi CBS 77 Gary Moore; alt Th 10-10:15 am; 15 Dec; 19 

alt wks 

North Adv, Chi CBS 121 Person to Person; alt F 10:30-11 pm; 6 Jan; 3 

alt wks 



Hicks & Creist, NY 

Product Services, NY 

D-F-S, NY 

Cordon Best, Chi 



2. Renewed on Television Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



American Tobacco, NY 
Emerson Drug Co, Balti 



F 9-9:30 pm; 9 March 26 wks 

a Lifetime; alt S 9-9:30 pm; 1 Jan; 



General Electric, NY 
Kellogg Co, Battle Creek 
Lever Bros, NY 



SSCB, NY ... NBC 108 Bis Story; 

Lennen & Newell, NY ABC Chance of 

13 wks 

BBDO, NY CBS 150 CE Theatre; S 9-9:30 pm; 25 Dec; 52 wks 

Leo Burnett, Ch' CBS 62 Gary Moore; T 10:15-10:30 am; 3 Jan; 52 wks 

JWT, NY ..CBS 69 Arthur Godfrey Time; M & W 11-11:15 am; 2 

Jan; 52 wks 

Mercury Dealers, Chi CBS 167 Ed Sullivan Show; S 8-9 pm; 1 Jan; 52 wks 

Olin Mathieson, NY Cant Adv, NY ... ABC Chance of a Lifetime; S 9-9:30 pm; 

R. J. Reynolds, Winston-Salem, NC William Es'y, NY CBS 136 Crusader; alt F 9-9:30 pm; 6 Jan; 52 wks 

R. J. Reynolds, Winston-Salem, NC William Esty, NY CBS 172 I've Cot a Secret; W 9:30-10 pm; 4 Jan; 52 wks 

Simoniz Co, Chi .... ..... SSCB, NY NBC 108 ... Big Story; F 9-9:30 pm; 9 March; 26 wks 

Sawyer's, Inc, Portland, Ore ...... Carvell, Nelson & Powell, NBC 105 Home Show; 9 parties; 6 Jan-4 April 

Portland 

A. E. Staley, Decatur, III Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY.. CBS 64 Gary Moore; alt M 10:15-10:30 am; 16 Jan; 7 

alt wks 
Yardley of London, NY N. W. Ayer & Sons, NY CBS 57 Gary Moore: F 11-11:15 am; 30 Dec; 13 wks 



3. Broadcast Industry Executives 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



James F. Anderson WOAI, San Antonio, prom mgr _ KIWW, S3n Antonio, general mgr 

Lu Bassett WSAI, Cinn, acct exec .._... Same, natl sales mgr 

Wayne Beavers K C EQ-TV, St. Joseih, Mo, regional sales director Same, comm. mgr 

Charles C .Bevis, Jr KOA, Denver, general mgr _ WBUF-TV, Buffalo, general mgr 

Ronald E. Buchanan _ WIW-C, Columbus, Ohio, sales exec WBZ-WBZA, Arlington, Mass, sales 

Edwin Cahn Pulse, LA, mgr *ame, Pacific activities director 

Donald F. Campbell Edward Petry, NY, tv acct exec WSPD, Toledo, NY sales evec 

Albert F. Capstaff NBC Radio, NY Same, exec producer of Monitor 

Harry Dangerfield, Jr. KDKA, Pittsburgh KBTV, Denver, sales 

William B. Decker NBC, spot sales, NY, acct director WBUF-TV, Buffalo, sales mgr 

Leonard P. Coorian ... WKRC-RC, Cinn, executive producer 

Clenn Griswold KFEQ-TV, St. Joseph, Mo, commercial mgr KFEQ-AM, KFEQ-TV, St. Joseph, general mgr 

David C. Hill .._CKDA, Victoria, B.C., sales _ _...Same, mgr 

Charles V. Hunter WJW, Cleveland, sales Same, sales mgr 

Allan Klenman CKNW, Van-:ouve', sales mgr CKDA, Victoria, B.C., sales mgr 

Robert E. Lang Radio Free Europe, director CBS, NY, news and public aairs div, sales director 

John Pindell KHQ-TV, Spokane, sales mgr KINC-TV, Seattle, local sales mgr 

James L. Prendergast W3JS, WinsJon-Salem, tv production mgr Same, tv program director 

Jo Ranson WMCM, NY, publicity director ..Same, public service program director 

George H. Rogers, Jr. WKRC-TV, Cinn, program dept Same, commercial prod mgr 

Robert Tyrol WTIC, Hertford, announcer Same, sales 




John 
Cantwell (4) 



George H. 
| Rogers, |r. 

(3) 






Frank 
Kemp (41 




Evan W. 

g Hayter (4) 




Donald P. 
Campbell (3) 




Jo Ranson 



In next issue: New and Renmced on Radio Networks; Broadcast Industry Executives; 
Sponsor Personnel Changes; Station Changes 



23 JANUARY 1956 



17 






23 JANUARY 1956 



\iit ami renew 



Clenn 

Criswold (3) 




Charles V. 
Hunter (3) 




Edwin 

Cahn (3) 



Norman E. 
Mork (4) 




Harry W. 
Ckesley, Jr. 



(4) 





4. Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Joseph F. Beck Scheidler & Beck, NY, vp Same, exec vp 

John 0. Bozell Bozell & Jacobs, Omaha, acct exec Same, vp 

John Cantwell Compton Adv, NY, merchandising Same, vp 

Harry W. Chesley, Jr. Philip Morris, NY, vp in charge of mkting D'Arcy, NY, exec vp & director 

Paul Cooke _ Compton Adv, NY, production Same, vp 

Val Corradi D. P. Brother, Detr . Same, vp 

Howard Foley DCSS, NY, copy supervisor . Same, vp 

West Cillingham W. B. Doner Adv, Detr, acct exec Ralph Sharp Adv, Detr, exec vp 

Walker Graham McGinn Erickson, Detr, vp and copy group head D. P. Brother, Detr, vp 

William Craves Cannon Mills, NY, asst adv-prom mgr Grey Adv, NY, contact acct exec 

Evan W. Hayter McCann Erickson (Canada) Ltd., Toronto, president 

Frank Kemp Compton Adv, NY, asst media director Same, vp and media director 

Charles W. Kopf _ Kenyon & Eckhardt, NY, acct exec Fred Wittner Agency, NY, vp and plans board mbr 

Norman D. Kosran Ehrlich, Neuwirth & Sobo, NY Same, adv mgr 

Cecilia E. Long .._ Ronalds Agency, Montreal, acct exec Same, women's promotion director 

Wallace R. MacDonald BBDO, NY, asst mgr internatl div ... Same, Atlanta, acct exec 

Jack Miller KCOP-TV, LA __Jimmy Fritz & Assoc, Hywood, merchandising-promoti 

C. Stuart Mitchell Compton Adv, NY, acct section Same, vp 

James Charles Molica Erwin, Wasey & Co, LA, acct exec 

Norman E. Mork B-B-T, San Fran, General mgr Same, vp in charge of West Coast accts 

Sheldon Moyer ... ...Kenyon & Eckhardt, Detr acct exec D. P. Brother, Detr, vp 

Fred J. Roth Kenyon & Ekhardt, NY, acct exec Donahue & Coe, NY acct exec 

Gilbert Supple Maxon Agency, NY Harry B. Cohen, NY, cpywritr 



S. New Firms, New Offices, Changes of Address 



John Blair & Co, Blair-TV and Hoag-Blair have moved to 

larger quarters in San Francisco's Russ Bldg. 
Dixie Advertisers, Jackson Miss, shortly will become known 

as Godwin Advertising Agency, will also have an office 

in New Orleans. 
Fitzerald Advertising, New Orleans, became a corporation 

on 28 December. 
KDKA, Pittsburgh, will move to Building 1 at Gateway 

Center. 
KRKD, LA, has moved to 6906 Santa Monica Blvd. New 

phone number is HO 5-2181. 



Arthur Lodge Productions and Boyd & Lodge Films, NY, 

will occupy expanded quarters at 21 West 46th St. 
Solters, O'Rourke and Associates, NY, has moved to 1780 

Broadway. 
Vic Maitland & Assoc, a new Pittsburgh agency, will locate 

in New Gateway Center. 
WATV and WAAT sales offices, NP, have both moved to 

515 Madison Ave. 
Frank Weston Adv-Public Relations, Providence, has moved 
to Diamond Hill Road, Cumberland R.F.D., Manville, R.I. 
WIBG, Phila, has moved offices to the Suburban Station 

Bldg. 



6. Station Changes (reps, network affiliation, power increases) 



KDUB-KDUB-TV, Lubbock, Texas will be represented by the 
Branham Company. 

KjR, Seattle, has appointed the Branham Company natl reps. 

K!OA, Des Moines, joined the ABC radio network. 

KSO, Des Moines, on relinquishing its ABC affiliation, be- 
came independent station 24 December. 

KWHP, Cushing, Okla has changed its call letters to KUSH. 

KWTX-TV and KANG-TV, both Waco stations, announced 
that they will merge operations. 

KXL, Portland, Oregon, has appointed the Branham Com- 
pany natl reps. 

WALB-TV, Albany, Ca, has appointed Venard, Rintoul & 
McConnell natl reps. 



WBBF, Rochester, is now being represented by Vernard, 
Rintoul & McConnell. 

WBBQ, Augusta, Ga, has appointed Everett-McKinney natl 
reps. 

WBEX, Chillicothe, Ohio, has become an ABC affiliate. 

WFBL, Syracuse, has been sold to Founders Corporation of 
NY. 

WBUF-TV, Buffalo, has become an afiliate of NBC. 

WHBQ, Memphis, has become an affiliate of ABC. 

WILD, Birmingham, was purchased by the Cordon Broad- 
casting Co. 

WSUN-WSUN-TV, St. Petersburg-Tampa, has appointed Ven- 
ard, Rintoul & McConnell natl reps. 



William B. 
Decker (3) 




18 



SPONSOR 



New surveys again 
prove preference for WHO! 



Study by Des Moines 
Chamber of Commerce Parallels 
Findings of Iowa Radio 
Audience Survey! 

_L l OW another new survey reaffirms what the 
Iowa Radio Audience Surveys have shown for 
years! 

The new 46-county study has just been re- 
leased by the Greater Des Moines Chamber of 
Commerce. It was made for tbe benefit of Des 
Moines merchants — to discover why people shop 
in Des Moines — to show what Des Moines mer- 
chants can do to improve their own businesses. 

Significantly, this Survey shows that WHO 
Radio is listened-to-most by 61.4% of the Des 
Moines Trading Area's families. (Tbe new 1955 
Iowa Radio Audience Survey reports 59.2% for 
the State as a whole ! ) . 

Copies of the Iowa Radio Audience Survey 
are now available. They tell you just about 
everything you need to know about radio in 
Iowa. Mail the coupon today for your free copy! 

il 





Affiliate 

FREE & PETERS. INC., 
Exclusive National Representatives 



BUY ALL of IOWA- 
Pins "Iowa Plus"-with 



PI 



Des Moines . . . 50,000 Watts 

Col. B. J. Palmer, President 
P. Av Loyet , Resident Manager 



195S 



R *0»0 AUO«" 



cf Sw rtr»* 






^ «~— - 



° S ^ nt come* 05 



»»« »• '"• 






Radio Station WHO 
Des Moines, Iowa 

Gentlemen: Please rush me a complimentary copy of 
the Iowa Radio Audience Survey. 



N< 



Fii 



Street. 



City_ 



State. 



23 JANUARY 1955 



19 



mwumm 

THAT SELL 



ONE OF THE BEST UHF 

MARKETS IN THE U.S. 

98 % Converted, March 1 955, ARB 




WICS staff newsman whose daily "News 
Final" carries 24.0 Telepulse (Nov. 
1954)— other news programs equally 
high rating. News work is straight, 
forthright, and factual — punctuated with 
film, slides, and interviews. 




IW^kV^ JULIE CRAIG 

1 *<■■■■■■! 



WICS Women's Director— does two daily 
shows aimed primarily to the 'better 
half of the Channel 20 audience. Daily 
evening "Shopping with Julie" show 
carries 29.0 rating (Pulse, Nov. 1954). 
If you want the women of Illinois' State 
Capital Market, Julie can and will de- 
liver. 




!■">■>.. DICK O'NEILL 



WICS News Editor — specializes in local 
news coverage. Daily "Local News" 
show carries 29.0 rating (Pulse, Nov. 
1954). Ample use of film, slides, and 
still photos of local news events keeps 
the audience that buys your products. 

WICS 

springfield; Illinois 

For availabilities call, write, or wire 
WICS direct or Adam Young Television 
Corp. 





Norman C Owen 

V.p. in charge of sales 
CBS-Columbia, Long Island City, New York 

Norman Owen's one man who's not afraid to buck a trend, when 
he's convinced of a theory. As CBS-Columbia's v.p. in charge of 
sales, he frequently has to make marketing and advertising strategy 
decisions by Madison Avenue's own yardstick: "Enough facts and a 
good hunch." 

Recently, Owen explained his concept of network radio adver- 
tising to SPONSOR: "We've found net radio to be most successful 
in the past. It has done much to create strong product identifica- 
tion and sales. In 1956 network radio has a most important part 
in our over-all marketing program.'' 

In practice, this means that CBS-Columbia ( through Ted Bates 
& Co.) is continuing its participating sponsorship of three CBS 
Radio shows: Amos V Andy, Mondays 9:30-9:55 p.m., Bing 
Crosby, Wednesdays 7:30-7:45 p.m. and Edgar Bergen, Sundavs 
7:05-8:00 p.m. 

Some 65% of CBS-Columbia's ad budget goes into radio-tv ad- 
vertising of the firm's radio and tv sets. 

"We haven't been advertising radio sets recently," Owen added. 
"But from now until June we'll be rotating radio set commercials 
advertising our new transistor line on all our shows." 

As far as tv goes, we're now taking a leaf from the automobile 
industry boom and going out aggressively after the replacement mar- 
ket where an anticipated 2.2 million tv sets can be sold in 1956." 

On tv. CBS-Columbia's mainstay is Arthur Godfrey and His 
Friends. 

"Godfrey has done a tremendous job for CBS-Columbia," Owen 
told sponsor. "He has created a link in the public's mind between 
CBS and CBS-Columbia products. His are the kind of commercials 
that make people come into dealers' stores asking to 'see the sets 
Arthur Godfrey spoke about last night.' He's the greatest sales- 
man on tv today." 

At a 27 December sales convention at the Waldorf in New York, 
Owen had proof that his sales force is behind the advertising effort. 

"Arthur Godfrey came in and the men burst into applause," he 
recalls. 

Now suburbanites, Owen and his wife spend a lot of time writing 
to only daughter Karen who's at the University of Colorado. * * * 



20 



SPONSOR 



RESULTS 
COUNT... 



1290 

on everyone's Radio 






A'S 



m m 



ONLY 24-Hl« 




UR M 



USIC, NEWS AND SPORTS STM 




and you 
get 'em on 



RADIO CENTER 

AVERY-KNODEL — Exclusive National Rep. 



Exclusive National Representatives §\ W t ll I " IX 1 1 V 1/ h L i Inc. 



AVERY-KNODEL, 






Local billings U 



You can bet the local advertisers know . . . better than any survey . . . which 
station gets results best! So when dozens of new ones buy and re-buy KOIL, 
there must be a reason. Incidentally, the latest pulse shows our ratings are 
way up, too! 

a 11 sales are LOCAL . . . anl 



RESULTS COUNT. ..and 



'DECEMBER '55 OVER DECEMBER '54 



OMAHA'S ONLY 2 4-HOUR 




n [30011 £ 



AHA 



Itiat includes YOURS! 



u get 'em on 

JSIC NEWS SPORTS STATION 



ftOIL 



RADIO CENTER 

5000 WATTS — FULL TIME 






the proof of the puddin', is in the eating! 



1956 OMAHA AAA 

BASEBALL 

again exclusively on Uv^/ U LJ 



The tremendous popularity of Radio KOIL . . . 

among listeners and advertisers alike, both 
local and national ... is further emphasized 
by D'Arcy Advertising of St. Louis, again 
selecting Radio KOIL to carry the complete 
schedule in spite of strong competitive bids 
from 3 other Omaha radio stations. 



see Avery-Knodel, Inc. .. . for all the details. 





DUGOUT DOPE 

1 5-min. of 
pre-game color 




COREBOARD" 
All the latest -scores 
local /and national 



RESULTS COUNT . . . and you GET 'EM on KOIL 




DON HILL will again broad- 
cast exclusively for KOIL the 
1956 Omaha Cardinals AAA 
Baseball games . . . 

both home and away. 




by Joe Csida 

Imagination, ingenuity should top <I.j. hit parade 

It is a safe bet, with the vast amount of record program- 
ing on local radio stations these days, that the largest amount 
of money spent in local radio by advertisers and agencies is 
on disk jockey shows. And it is an equally safe guess that 
if all such programs are carefully planned, sets-in-use and 
rating figures will go up, and these shows will do an even 
better job for the advertiser than they've done to date. It 
is for this reason that the mail response to the column I 
did a couple of issues back, decrying the lack of imagina- 
tion and ingenuity in music programing on radio, has been 
so gratifying. It is also for this reason that I believe pur- 
suing the subject from time to time, may lead to some tangi- 
ble good from the advertiser, the station and the record 
company standpoints. To get the ball rolling, two of the 
letters, one from KFOR in Lincoln, Nebraska; the other 
from W-GTO in Haines City, Florida will serve nicely. 

Robert Askey, program director of the ABC affiliate in 
Lincoln, raises a question which has made it difficult for 
broadcasters to do a top job for advertisers, and which has 
plagued record makers for some time. I will merely let 
Bob state the question here, and will check the record manu- 
facturers in the next several weeks to see what can be ac- 
complished. But here's Bob's beef: 

Dear Mr. Csida: 

As one of the few stations who programed "Passions in 
Paint" as it was sent to us, I read with interest your article 
in the Sponsor Magazine of December 12th. 
I would be interested in contacting someone at Coral Records 
concerning shipments of samples to our station. Earlier 
Coral has proposed a service contract — they give us so many 
records and we pay them so much money. My counter- 
proposal of charging them our card rate for air time de- 
voted to their records has been coolly received to say the 
least. 

If there is some way that you can help me break this barrier 
I would be very appreciative. 

Sincerely, 
Robert Askey 
Program Director 

Let me know, if you will, how you handled this situation. 
(Please turn to page 116) 




theViewer'sChoice 



ALL OF THE TOP 15 ONCE-A-WEEK 
SHOWS ore on WREX-TV 

Rank Show Rating 

1 $64,000 Question 57.0 

2 I've Got a Secret 48.3 

3 Waterfront 48.0 

4 Millionaire 46.5 

5 Ed Sullivan Show 46.4 

6 Meet Millie 46.0 

7 What's My Line 43.0 

8 Make Room for Daddy 42.0 

9 Racket Squad 42.0 

10 Whiting Girls 42.0 

1 1 Disneyland 41 .4 

12 G. E. Theatre 40.8 

Honeymooners 40. 

Badge 714 40.3 

You'll Never Get Rich 39. 




ALL OF THE TOP 15 SYNDICATED 
FILMS are on WREX-TV 

Rank Show Rating 

1 Waterfront 48.0 

2 Racket Squad 42.0 

3 Badge 714 40.3 

4 City Detective 32.0 

5 Kit Carson 29.5 

6 Mayor of the Town 27.5 

7 Guy Lombardo 24.5 

8 Big Playback 24.0 

9 I Led Three Lives 22.8 

10 Town and Country Time. . 20.8 

11 Frank Leahy Football. .. . 19.5 

12 Ames Brothers 17.5 

13 Highway Patrol 16.3 

14 Million Dollar Movie 16.3 

15 Studio 57 15.8 

Area Survey by Pulse, Inc., Sept. 1955 
Represented by H. R. Television, Inc. 




CBS-ABC Affiliations 
Now Telecasting in Color 

WREX-TV «£*w 13 



ROCKFORD, 



L L I N O I S 



23 JANUARY 1955 



25 



NB(G SPOT SAL1ES 

IS FBOIHED TO 

WEIIXQMIE 




TV 



DENVER, 

NBC Spot Sales is happy to announce that 
effective February 1, KOA-TV, VHF chan- 
nel 4 in Denver, Colorado, joins the roster 
of great television stations which it repre- 
sents nationally. 

308,800 families, with an effective buying 
income of nearly 1.7 billion dollars, live in 
KOA-TV's coverage area. And KOA-TV 
leads all other Denver TV stations in over- 
all share-of-audience. 

A sure way to reach and sell a prosperous 
and growing market — 

KOA-TV 

represented nationally by 

SPOT SALES 




30 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York 20, N. Y. 

also representing television stations wrca-tv New York, 

WNBQ Chicago, krca Los Angeles, ksd-tv St. Louis, WRC-TV Washington, D. C, 

WNBK Cleveland, KOMO-TV Seattle, kptv Portland, Ore., WAVE-TV Louisville, 

WRGB Schenectady- Albany-Troy, KONA-tv Honolulu. Hawaii. 



26 



SPONSOR 



NBC SPOT SMJES 

IS FMjOTUIED TO 

WELCOME 




Radio 

DENVEIV 

NBC Spot Sales is happy to announce the 
return of KOA-Radio, effective February 1, 
to the roster of great radio stations which 
it represents nationally. 

KOA-Radio, with 50,000 watts power, serves 
Denver ... a top ranking metropolitan area 
. . . and 302 counties in 12 states. It has been 
delivering coverage, circulation and results 
to advertisers for 31 years. 

Let dominant KOA-Radio sell for you in 
the Western Market. 




KOA-RADIO 

represented nationally by 



NBGl SPOT SALES 



30 Rockefeller Plaza 
New York 20, N. Y. 

also representing radio stations wrca New York, 

WMAQ Chicago, knbc San Francisco, ksd St. Louis, wrc Washington, D. C, 

WTAM Cleveland, komo Seattle, wave Louisville, KGU Honolulu, Hawaii, 

and the nbc western radio network. 



23 JANUARY 1956 



27 



NOT SEVENTEEN? 




YES...WBRE-TV 

does have 

a 17 County Coverage 

Everything's BIG about WBRE-TV. BIG in Power ... the 
Nation's First Million Watt Station. BIG in viewing area 
...17 counties of N.E. Pennsylvania covering a popula- 
tion of almost 2,000,000. BIG in buying income . . . 
400,000 families with a spending potential close to 
$2,000,000,000. These are only a few facts that 
make WBRE-TV the BIG advertising buy in this 
choice consumer market. Call us or your 
Headley-Reed representative for proof of 
WBRE-TV's higher program ratings, better 
picture performance, higher set count . . . 
and answers to any of your questions. 



It is a Zoological fact that the height of a 
Gixaite from the bottom ot its front teet to the 
top of its head has towered 17 feet and more 
. . . the better to reach the choice tender leaves. 



BASIC BUY : National Representative : The Headley-Reed Co. 



Counties Covered: LUZERNE LACKAWANNA LYCOMING 

SCHULYKILL NORTHUMBERLAND MONROE PIKE 

WYOMING SULLIVAN SUSQUEHANNA BRADFORD 

SNYDER MONTOUR CARBON 



COLUMBIA 

WAYNE 

UNION 



23 JANUARY 1 956 



FILM'S $100 1MLLI0I 111 



• Syndicated, feature film gross expected to top 1955 by 25% 

• More national, regional clients are attracted to spot film 

• Big question: How will flood of movies affect syndication? 



1 he film distribution business — expanding in all directions — may hit the magical 
$100 million mark in 1956. 

This assumes a healthy 25% jump in business over 1955, which, as sponsor predicted 
a year ago, was in the neighborhood of $80 million. Some of the more optimistic quarters 
(and the film distribution business is nothing if not optimistic) see a possibility of even $110 
million. This includes syndication of film made for tv and feature film product. 

Whatever the actual figure, there is no question of this fact: Film syndication is big 
and it's getting bigger. And it's getting bigger because it offers the advertiser a way to 
sell goods, an alternative method of buying programing and a flexible way of buying a 
medium. If it didn't, it wouldn't be there. 

The figures above are admittedly general estimates. In this rough-and-tumble industry, 
sales figures are either used for promotional reasons or not given out at all — mostly the 
latter. Even stockholder's reports mask sales figures. 

However, there are good reasons for optimism in a business 
bothered by free-wheeling prices, clearances, too much 
product, lack of capital. The top firms reported 
sales curves slanting in a clearly northeast 
direction during 1955 and bigger pro 
graming schedules. Ziv's 1955 
billings were 42% above 1954; 
Screen Gems is lipping pro- 
duction plans 50%; TPA 
(Continues next page) AND CLEARANCES? 



WHAT 14 
QUESTIONS DO 
ADMEN ASK BEFORE 
BUYING A FILM? SEE 
ANSWERS ON PAGE 46 



ARE YOU UP ON-FACTS 
ABOUT FILM PRICES. 



FOR A FILL-IN, 



SEE PAGE 44 




THREE BIG FILM TRENDS 




1 



More multi-market buys: Shown above discussing Continental 
Baking's 70-market spread tor "Annie Oakley'' are (I. to r.) 
Wilbur Edwards, CBS Film's sales chief; Lou Hill, acct. exec, 
Ted Bates; Lee Marshall, firm ad mgr.; John Howell, CBS Film 




2 



More mature merchandising: Duncan Renaldo, star of Ziv's 
'"Cisco Kid,' shakes hands during personal appearance tour with 
Claude Richards, 1., E. J. Walker, of Arden Aleadow Cold Ice 
Cream & Dairies, Salt Lake City sponsors a long-running show 




More feature film: "Notorious," with Ingrid Bergman, Cary 
Grant, one of 11 Selznick features bought for tv by NTA. During 
1955 and this month, over 1,000 features, over 300 Westerns, 
about 4,000 shorts, cartoons, were released to tv film firms 



reports sales 63% over 1954; Guild 
reports a hike of over 50% ; CBS 
Film Sales registered a 50% jump; 
ABC Film Syndication, a comparative 
newcomer, doubled its sales; Walter 
Schwimmer Co. reports an increase of 
40%. And so on down the line. 

Film distributors also saw an in- 
crease in multi-market spot buys by 
national and regional advertisers, a 
happy portent against a background 
of efforts by syndicators to balance 
their sales from all quarters. In most 
cases, this is matter of increasing the 
percentage of multi-market sales as 
against local sales to stations and 
local advertisers. Aside from the 
concept of being strong in more than 
one sales area, an important reason 
for pushing multi-market sales were 
a few weak spots appearing in syndi- 
cation sales, especially in product that 
has been around for some time. Syn- 
dicators reacted by bringing out fewer 
new series for syndication in 1955 
(about a dozen compared to 16 the 
year before) and this served to hold 
the price line somewhat. 

The drive to balance sales also had 
its effect (in reverse) on a firm like 
Screen Gems, which has six network 
shows running and is the envy of its 
colleagues (whose salesmen have to 
pound the street selling many shows 
market by market). Screen Gems is 
out to up its syndication sales and 
hope? to divvy up national and local 
sales 50-50 for the fiscal year begin- 
ning 1 July. Its current breakdown 
is about 65% national (to a syndica- 
tor national sales include both net- 
work and multi-market) and 35% 
local. Screen Gems' actual sales tar- 
get for the next fiscal year is $7.5 
million in billings for both sides of 
the fence, a total of $15 million. 

Commenting on the multi-market 
picture, Frederic W. Ziv, board 
chairman of Ziv Tv Programs, said 
recently: "The long-term trend has 
been toward major regional and na- 
tional advertisers realizing the ad- 
vantages and flexibilities of syndica- 
tion, although local-level sales remain 
the backbone of the business." 

Ziv's multi-market sales are now up 
to 40% of total billings. The firm's 
multi-market sales in 1955 were 56% 
above 1954, compared to a 42% in- 
crease in all sales. 

The increasing interest in spot tv 
programing by regional and national 
clients is seen by syndicators as the 



30 



SPONSOR 







Old: Success of "Little Rascals," title of New: Hollywood Tv Service, subsidiary of 

famous "Our Gang" comedies, distributed by Republic Pictures, will start syndication of 

Interstate Tv, shows there's still gold in "Adventures of Dr. Fu Manchu" in Febru- 

ancient movies. Stations have been stripping ary. Show is good example of how syndi- 

them, have hit ratings in the 20s and 30s cators pick stories of proven appeal for tv 



Perennial: Licensed merchandise adds plus 
to film show promotion. Milton Gordon, 
1., Michael Sillerman, r., TPA president, 
exec. v.p. respectively, discuss licensing 
with Allen Stone of Stone Associates 



fruition of persistent sales promotion 
and what they like to call education. 
Another factor has been simply that 
those agencies and advertisers stand- 
ing on the sideline have watched 
others plunge into syndication and 
do well at it. Syndicators told spon- 
sor that, in many cases, clients and 
agencies have shied away simply from 
fear of trying something new. 

National and regional advertisers 
do not confine their purchases of syn- 
dicated shows to full sponsorship in 
a list of markets, of course. Stations 
offer and advertisers buy participa- 
tions in such shows. During 1955 an 
important trend opened more oppor- 
tunities for such buys. 

The trend : syndicated shows in 
strips during weekdays. For the most 
part this stripping was done during 
the day, mostly between 1:00 and 
6:00 p.m. and early and late evening. 
One reason for daytime stripping was 
the fact that it is easier to find time, 
since stripping is a common daytime 
format. Another is that stations wel- 
comed the chance of offering programs 
of "nighttime quality" rather than 
locally-produced kitchen and person- 
ality strips. 

Particularly active in selling strips 
are Official and both the CBS and 
NBC film sales outfits. The network 
subsidiaries have been successful in 
pushing the stripping of Westerns, 
such as Gene Autry, Range Rider 
(both CBS) and Hopalong Cassidy 



I NBC I. Official, which claims to 
have started the trend, has been sell- 
ing reruns of two network shows 
(situation comedies) My Little Margie 
and Trouble With Father (formerly 
the Stu Erwin Show) plus reruns of 
the syndicated show Foreign Intrigue 
under the titles Dateline Europe, Over- 
seas Adventure and Cross Current. 
I Three titles are used because each 
features a different star.) 

Stripping, naturally, requires a big 
backlog of film. One season's pro- 
duction (39 episodes) would last less 
than two months for a single run. 
The Foreign Intrigue group, for ex- 
emple, totals 156 titles. As shows 
now in production pile up episodes, 
the pressure for stripping will un- 
doubtedly increase. 

It appears, however, that stripping 
will come up against what is prob- 
ably thg most dramatic .development 
in the film bu&i-Hess: the heavy -release, 
during 1955 and early 1956 of feature 
films, Westerns, shorts and cartoons 
by major studios in Hollywood and 
abroad plus some independents. 

The feature film list alone comes to 
well over 1,000, the Westerns total 
well over 300 and the shorts and car- 
loons tote up to about 4,000. Some 
are already on the market and sold. 
• The bulk of the features, those in- 
cluded in the sale of 740 RKO fea- 
tures by General Teleradio to C & C 
Super Corp. and the 104 to be re- 
leased by Columbia Pictures through 



Screen Gems, had not. at sponsor's 
presstime, found their way to tv 
screens. 

What will happen to the syndication 
business when they do is a mat- 
ter of dispute. Publicly, most of the 
syndicators are unworried, their stand 
being that movies are too long to 
squeeze easily into time slots where 
feature films are not now running. A 
typical comment is that of Harold L. 
Hackett, president of Official Films: 

"An hour and 20-minute picture, 
when filled with spot commercial con- 
tent, runs almost an hour and 40 min- 
utes, and except for the two times 
mentioned (early and late evening), 
there is hardly any other period when 
a reasonably good-sized audience can 
find this amount of free time, away 
from daily commitments, to view 
another motion picture. As opposed 
to this, the half-hour tv program in 
daytime hours is always capable of 
obtaining a good audience." 

Hackett expected the RKO and 
{Please turn to page 131) 



1956 FILM SECTION 
STARTS ON PAGE 43 

Admen interested in spot tv 

film will find program 

information, help on how 

to buy syndicated shows, key 

research data on audiences 



23 JANUARY 1956 



31 



Spot radio change-of-pace 

gives Hosier right combination 

Safe manufacturer turns print campaign into spot radio effort, 
gains greater "clanger message" impact, softens tough markets 



JjfM osier Safe Co. has an odd prob- 
lem. It's the Cadillac of its field, and 
chances are it's one of the first makes 
a businessman thinks of anytime he 
gets around to thinking of a safe at all. 
Trouble is, as far as Mosler is con- 
cerned, not enough businessmen think 
of safes often enough — or in time. 

To get them to do so, Mosler began, 
about a year and a half ago, to use 
spot radio the way a general would use 
artillery — to soften the market for its 
infantry of salesmen. Objective: To 
make businessmen safe-conscious by 
making them aware of the constant 
threat to their vital papers. Technique: 
To dramatize what happens to said 
papers when fire hits. Last year the 
company spent more than a fifth of its 
half-million-dollar budget for this kind 
of ammunition. Target cities were six 
of the eight in which the firm has 
branch offices: New York, Chicago, 
Philadelphia, Boston, Buffalo and 



Washington, key safe sales areas. 

Why radio? Langdon Littlehale, ad- 
vertising manager of Mosler and en 
old campaigner himself, puts it this 
way: 

"We have four big points to get 
across. Print ads just don't give you 
the time to get the whole message 
across; there's readership fall-off. But 
in radio I have more of a captive audi- 
ence. I have time to build my sales 
story and I can emphasize each point 
the way I want. 

"Can't do that in newspaper or 
magazine ads. Here! I'll show you 
what I mean." He took some commer- 
cial scripts from a drawer, leafed 
through them quickly, pulled one out 
and tossed it across the desk. "That's 
a take-off on Dragnet," he said. "Now 
listen to it come alive." He flipped the 
switch on a nearby record player. We 
listened through the 48 seconds it took 
for the e.t. to play through the script. 




WHAT SPOT RADIO DRIVE DOES FOR MOSLER 



1. Pounds away at key markets where company's branch 
office salesmen, with pre-selling accomplished, follow through 
with direct personal contact to emphasize radio points 

2. Dramatizes constant danger without reliable safe, subtly 
weaves in main sales points, holds audience for full impact 

3. Gives change of pace to national promotion when needed, 
thereby shifting focus for better over-all balance of media 




In the familiar flat, almost toneless 
conversational style of Dragnet, it 
went like this: 

MAN NO. 1: And when did you find 
out about it? 

MAN NO. 2: When I got to the office 
the next morning. Still smokin'. 

MAN NO. 1: Boss sent everybody 
home? 

MAN NO. 2: Sure. Nothin' else to do. 

MAN NO. 1: Never could figure it, 
though. Always thought the build- 
ing was fireproof. 

MAN NO. 2: Doesn't mean a thing. 
Not if a fire starts inside. 



MAN NO. 1 : Company had plenty of 

insurance, I guess. 
MAN NO 2: Yeah . . . only they 

couldn't collect fully on it. 
MAN NO. 1: Why not? 
MAN NO. 2: Got to have proof of loss! 
MAN NO. 1: Well? 
MAN NO. 2: No records. 
MAN NO. 1 : Weren't they in a safe? 
MAN NO 2: Sure ... in the safest 

looking safe you ever saw. Been 

there since the firm was founded. 
MAN NO. 1: Well? 
MAN NO. 2: Hear it acted just like an 

incinerator. Accounts receivable. In- 



ventory records . . . everything . . . 
nothing but ashes. 

MAN NO. 1: How soon you going 

back to work? 
MAN NO. 2: Don't know. The firm's 

going out of business. 

"See what I mean?" said Littlehale. 
"You just can't get that kind of impact 
with a print ad." 

"It's psychological," explained Ar- 
nold Belasco, assistant ad manager of 
Mosler. "Each one of our selling points 
is negative: (1) Protect your records 
from fire, (2) Your old safe is prob- 
(Please turn to page 127) 



CAN YOU TELL THIS STORY BY EAR? 

Mosler problem was to transfer print copy into 
radio, implying the reliability of safes given 
torture tests at laboratories. At left, in simu- 
lated performance in fire at lab, safe is heated 
for one hour to 2,000 degrees F., it is . . . 




THEN HOISTED THREE STORIES, DROPPED 
THIS SAFE, NOT A MOSLER, DIDN'T PASS 






MOST PRODUCTS SHOW UP WELL 



ON COLOR TV . . . BUT THESE WERE PROBLEMS 



PRODUCT 



PROBLEM 



SOLUTION 



preserves 



Product turned black 
due to opaqueness with 
different flavors showing 
same coloring 



Products thinned with gelatin and lighted ad- 
tionally 45 degrees from back. Vertical line 
of light was sent through preserve glasses 
using "barndoor." Good color achieved 



margarine 




Product too yellow, 
appeared like ice cream 



Yellow vegetable coloring added to intensify 
the yellow of the product, gaining desired result 







rice 


Product not white enough OfT-white color of uncooked rice was changed 
to give good impression when semi-cooked rice was used. Results good 










paint 


Colors displayed had ten- Adjusted angle of light to surface for paint 
dency to turn gray samples, eliminating reflected light 







Reflected light made cop- 
per coffee warmer ap- 
pear as gleaming silver 



Object placed inside of copper coffee warmer's 
silver- foil lined barrel so that diffused rather 
than direct light could be used. Results good 




Model's skin darkened 
against brilliance of 
satin evening dress with 
loss of display force 



Gown shown in evening situation with dress 
key-lighted against blue background. Face of 
model in semi-darkness made darker skin 
tone normal in display situation. Results good 



Normal light caused 
black blurring on 
some of lighter areas 



Lighting was changed so that overhead light 
diffused entirely on displayed product giving 
an evenness in color. Results excellent 



neckties 



Tie colors tended to 
darken against shirts 



Ties displayed against dark fabric background 
rather than against pastel colored shirts 



beer 



Green label tended 
to show up as black 



Dark green in label painted lighter to decrease 
high contrast with other colors in label 



shrimp 



Extreme white gave prod- 
uct unreal appearance 



Product allowed to remain unrefrigerated and 
darken down which allowed good results 



34 



SPONSOR 




MODERN COLOR STUDIO FACILITIES OF NEW ORLEANS' WDSU-TV ARE SHOWN IN PHOTO MADE DURING RECENT COLOR CLINIC 

Ire four products color blind ? 

Tv clinic diagnoses cHeni-agency color iils, prescribes remedies 



WW hipped margarine looking like 
ice cream, copper turning into silver 
and bright red enamel taking on the 
dirty gray appearance of a sea-tired 
battleship. 

These are just a few of the prob- 
lems agencies and advertisers encoun- 
ter when black-and-white television 
takes on color. 

But the outlook is not all black. A 
little ingenuity and lessons learned 
from working with products being 
telecast in color will make real sense 
out of the topsy-turvy hues. There's 
one thing, though. It's not easy. 

There has to be a great willingness 
to test the trial-and-error method to 
make sure that the beautiful red straw- 
berry jam doesn't look inky-black and 
the ocean-fresh shrimp doesn't become 
a ghastly white. 

There's been a lot of pioneering 

23 JANUARY 1956 



done in what's-my-product-going-to- 
look-like-on-color-tv, especially by the 
networks. But now individual stations 
are examining the field of color tele- 
vision to make sure that when it's 
fully commercial they won't be left 
showing a jar of kelly green mustard. 

One such station that has been con- 
centrating its color activity for the 
special benefit and instruction of its 
advertisers and their agencies is 
WDSU-TV in New Orleans. And there 
was one thing apparent from the start: 
the fact book hadn't been written on 
all the problems a station might en- 
counter in the use of color tv. 

Take, as an example, a bottle of 
beer with red and green lettering on 
the label. Sounds simple enough to 
show in color. It wasn't. When the 
color camera was turned on the dra- 
matically lighted bottle, the green had 



turned to a glistening black. 

WDSU-TV's color experts, calm be- 
fore the queasy-looking agencymen 
who suddenly thought about a whole 
new label, took the thing in stride. A 
little lighter green paint touched on 
the green lettering solved the problem 
quickly. 

It's apparent, though, that without 
this trial-and-error method in the new 
field of color telecasting a lot of clients 
might take a dim view of the results 
and decide to stay with black-and- 
white. This one factor in itself could, 
when multiplied by many markets, 
retard greatly the progress of color tv. 

Color can be an expensive play- 
thing. Networks and stations have 
found this out as they experimented 
with one item after another in the 
vast field. WDSU-TV went into color 
(Please turn to page 130 1 



35 



How to be a success and suffer 

Seller's market brings new headaehes to tv station managers with client- 
agency demands running far in front of availabilities and facilities 



J%_ few weeks back a tv station man- 
ager got an irate note from a national 
adviser: 

". . . Our dealer in your market in- 
formed us that you're now running 
commercials for Product X at 8:00 
p.m. every night. We've been request- 
ing this time period from you for two 

years now. Why the H did you sell 

it to our competitor? . . ." 

The reason in this case was that 
Product X had been buying heavy 
schedules regularly on the station for 
over a year. Its schedules were im- 
proved by the station because it felt 
the company was most entitled to the 
slot because of the amount of time it 
was buying. 

The angry* reaction is typical of the 
headaches tv station managers through- 
out the country contend with. For 
most of the stations, the seller's mar- 
ket is continuing strong. But waiting 
lists for nighttime and good daytime 
sales don't spell the end of all prob- 
lems. Managers of successful tv sta- 
tions have to worry about servicing 
their many clients, contending with 
growing pains as demand runs ahead 
of time availability and facilities, pro- 
graming budgets and administration. 

A sizable minority of tv stations, 
however, aren't profiting from the 



boom — namely most uhf stations and 
those vhf's struggling along in mar- 
kets too small to support them. The 
headaches of men managing these 
stations are not unlike those of radio 
station managers today (see previous 
issue) . 

However, in its survey of tv station 
managers, sponsor concentrated on 
the slew of problems that stem from 
the fact that business is generally 
booming, since this is more typical 
of tv stations today. These are the 
hurdles that most tv station managers 
face weekly : 

''The 48-hour r/«y": For most tv 
station managers "a 48-hour day 
would solve our biggest headache, 
particularly if the extra 24 hours came 
between 7:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m." 

The continuous clamor for prime 
evening time rings loud in each sta- 
tion managers ears, and it's up to 
him to hear complaints from clients 
who can't get on the air at that time 
and to set a priority policy. 

"You've also got to decide how and 
when to accommodate heavy-spending 
seasonal advertisers." said the general 
manager of a Northwestern station in 
a two-station market. "There's an 
obligation to the 52-week advertiser 



who's been buying late-afternoon in 
the hope of getting into Class "A." 
But then an agency comes along with 
a big boy who wants to come in with 
a saturaion for 13 weeks before 
Christmas providing he clears top 
time. And it's not unusual for the 
same agency to have two or three long- 
term advertisers on our station during 
the same year, which is a sort of club 
over our heads." 

Competitive products: It's a bigger 
headache than in radio, say most sta- 
tion managers who've worked both 
sides of the street. 

"Advertisers like frequency and 
low-cost insertion," the sales manager 
of a major network affiliate told spon- 
sor. "But in print media they'll al- 
low similar type products in reason- 
able adjacency, whereas on tv, they'd 
like the station virtually on an exclu- 
sive basis. I guess it's a compliment 
to the impact of tv, but it's a pain in 
the neck to us." 

Said a West Coast station manager 
who'd just completed the rounds of 
Madison Avenue agencies: "All right, 
one car commercial shouldn't follow 
another. But 15-minute separations 
should be ample. If a guy's com- 
petitor was on the air at 8:00 p.m.. 








'Ten men's meat, one viewer's 

poison," station execs say 

about continuous problem of 

not offending public's taste 




Prime nighttime's sold out, 
but advertisers still clamor 
for it, pressuring station 
men to give them priorities 




If talent's good, everyone 
bids for it, driving costs 
sky-high and depleting supply 
of performers for local shows 



Network shows in station time 
force stations to "bounce' 

local clients' shows, then 
sell announcements locally 




lie feels his 8:30 p.m. pitch is lost. It 
isn'true, but that's what I heard most 
often on my agency calls." 

Recently there have even been com- 
plaints over similar types of products 
coming too close together. Here's 
how a network affiliate in a Southern 
market explains it: 

"We're real careful to put as much 
airtime as possible between Maxwell 
House and Borden's Instant Coffee, 
for example. But does that solve the 
problem? Not at all. All beverages 
feel competitive. A ginger ale wants 
to be as far from beer or tea as from 
another soft drink. It's unreasonable. 
In print you can insert some extra 
pages. But they all want Class "A" 
time, and there are only so many 
time slots between 7:00 p.m. and 
10:30 p.m." 

"Exclusivity, that's the headache," 
said the general manager of a net- 
work flagship. "A client buys a net- 
work participating show that runs for 
90 minutes and he objects if a local 



DO YOU 
WANT REPRINTS 
OF THIS SERIES? 

If sufficient requests are 

received, SPONSOR will make 
reprints of series (listed 

on opposite page) available. 
Send requests to SPONSOR, 

40 E. 49th St., New York 17. 



cut-in 30 minutes removed is vaguely 
competitive. Of course, where there's 
a great deal of personal selling by the 
star, exclusivity follows. But when 
most commercials are film inserts 
why the big hassle?" 
Programing: It's a migraine, say 
station managers. 

"If I decide to develop a low-cost 
local show," one station man told 
sponsor, "I've got to pick and devel- 
op talent from a pretty limited fund 
in the first place. Big-name talent's 
too expensive and generally crowds to 
the top production centers. Then I 
have to count on spending a consid- 
erable sum promoting the local show 
to a point where it develops ratings 
and recognition. 



ZLOTNICK 

DRAWING HERE REPRESENT FOUR TYPICAL HEADACHES 
OF TV STATION MANAGERS WITH BOOMING BUSINESS 



Programing mainly feature films 
and syndicated film series brings on 
a batch of worries too. There's al- 
ways the chance that the cost of fibn 

{Please turn to page 120) 



Must a retailer stick 
to saturation radio? 



Von's, a Los Angeles supermarket firm, says no 

Sales gains of 30% registered by ehain which 

spends $6,000 a year for daily food show 



J^M ost retailers who use spot radio 
successfully fit it into their ad cam- 
paigns as a sort of electronic pogo 
stick. 

That is, they schedule saturation 
spot drives on peak shopping days and 
then jump their commercial emphasis 
around between various departments 
or types of products in the store, plug- 
ging a wide variety of bargains or 
price items. 

It's a perfectly good system, and 
many a radio case history file is full of 
the successes of saturation use at the 
local level. 

But for the past four years, the 
Von's Grocery Company of Los An- 
geles, an up-to-date chain of 24 super- 
markets throughout the metropolitan 
area of the huge California city, has 
been going in almost the opposite ad- 
vertising direction: 

• Von's is a major local radio user. 
But instead of scheduling announce- 
ments to blanket a particular day, 



News treatment : Daily five-minute show by Von's supermarkets 
on L. A.'s KBIG treats latest in produce as fast-breaking news 
story, plugs "daily specials," menus, and recipes. L. to r: KBIG 



program director Alan Lisser; program writer Margee Phillips; 
N. H. Bolstad, produce supervisor of Von's chain of 24 stores; 
Jack Hodges, produce buyer Show features only produce items 




Von's uses a daily five-minute show, 
Homemakers News, costing some 
$6,000 annually, in the same time slot 
each weekday on one of the city's top 
independents, KBIG. 

• Von's doesn't plug a wide variety 
of food bargains ranging from meats 
to ice cream and back, by way of 
frozen soups and brand-name coffees. 
Just one department — the produce sec- 
tion — is featured, with the theory be- 
ing that once the housewife has walked 
in the front door of a Von's store she'll 
also shop in other food departments. 

• Von's doesn't rely on a full knowl- 
edge on the part of a housewife con- 
cerning the products being featured. 
Instead, the basic gimmick of Home- 
makers News, as developed by Von's, 
KBIG, and the store's advertising agen- 
cy, Mogge-Privett, is an educational 
job on the use of various produce 
items — including off-beat ones, like 
egg-plant — in meal planning. Result: 
the show resembles a newscast slanted 
toward homemakers more than it does 
the more obvious forms of razzle-dazzle 
selling usually found in saturation ra- 
dio drives. 

Does the system work? 

Von's executives feel that the pro- 
gram series has played a definite role 
since its start in 1952 in building up 
the chain's general growth, and has 
done a top-notch job in boosting the 
chain's produce departments. Specifi- 
cally, featured products have shown 
weekly percentage increases from 20 to 
over 30% in sales. 

Why it works: The produce supervi- 
sor of the Von's chain, N. H. "Buzz" 
Bolstad, has one theory for the success 
of the firm's newsy, factual capsule 
show. 

"Radio today plays the role formerly 
filled by grocery clerks in explaining 
the background and the uses of fruits 
and vegetables," he says. 

"Homemakers who take their job 
seriously need continuing education, 
even in these days of supermarket pre- 
packaged produce. Our daily program 
gives the homemaker information and 
ideas in much the same way as the 
grocer himself did in the days of 
smaller and more intimate stores." 

KBIG's v.p. Bob McAndrews has an 
additional theory: 

"At the time when Homemakers 
News is aired, in a mid-morning spot 
from 10:25 to 10:30 a.m., housewives 
have recovered their second breath af- 
ter the breakfast rush and are thinking 
about the day's shopping and meal 




« ~t 






oS 




HOW VON'S RADIO BOOSTS PRODUCE SALES 

9 Year-round sell: Los Angeles food chain relies on 
steady pressure of daily five-minute show rather than 
periodic barrage of saturation announcements 

• Prestige appeal: Only one department, the produce 
section, is featured in firm's airselling. Idea is to build 
appeal of this one department so that the good will 
generated will apply to other departments 

• Education: Show lays heavy stress on use of rela- 
tively unknown vegetables, like egg-plant, and gives 
housewives tested receipes for preparing such items 

• Research: Part of show's annual time-and-talent 
budget of $6,000 goes for extensive field research on 
vegetable raising, marketing, and tips to consumers 

• Tieups: Occasional specials on daily show are tied 
to store chain's Thursday-Friday newspaper schedules, 
and are plugged in produce section with special signs 



MP 



0q'4.p* 






OX 



OS 



preparation. Younger homemakers 
especially require expert assistance in 
overcoming the proverbial disinterest 
of the male animal ( and both male and 
female small fry ) in things vegetable." 

The program's role in helping house- 
wives plan meals around unusual bar- 
gain produce specials is also credited 
by Margee Phillips, the show's writer, 
as being a prime reason for its success. 

"On each program, the homemaker 
is given one suggestion she can easily 
remember and use that day for meals," 
she says. "Occasionally, recipes re- 
quiring more detailed instructions than 
can be given in five minutes are out- 
lined. The listener can request the 
written recipe. Besides introducing 
new ideas for old stand-bys, the pro- 
gram directs the listener's attention to 
less popular produce items as well, and 
tells her how she can make tasty menus 
with them, as well as save money." 

Newscast approach: Von's show de- 
serves the title Homemakers News, for 
it is just that — news. 

The store chain's produce buying is 
covered by all concerned — Charles 
Stephenson, ad manager; produce su- 
pervisor Bolstad and produce buyer 



Jack Hodges; writer Margee Phillips; 
KBIG program director-and-newscast- 
er Alan Lisser — as a fast-breaking 
daily news story. 

Margee Phillips, a graduate of 
Whittier College and holder of a Mas- 
ter's degree in journalism from UCLA, 
functions as "news editor" for the 
show. She reported to sponsor: 

"Mr. Bolstad calls me after he fin- 
ishes his daily buying for the day on 
the wholesale market. Sometimes, when 
there has been a sudden change, and 
there is no time to write it down. Mr. 
Bolstad's 'scoop' is broadcast direct. 
The material is prepared fresh each 
morning, much in the same way a news- 
( Please turn to page 126) 



Award: Show, a rare blend of public service 
and smart selling, has won several awards. 
Here, John Kemp of Advertising Association 
of the \VtM presents Merit Certificate to staff 




23 JANUARY 1956 



39 



" 



NUMBER 
THREE 



Will these 19 local prop 

Charts below are your key to shifts in program emphasis. They're It 

"Fl FVI^IftN" Maj ° ] CHangeS ^^ bee " nUmbei "' Stati ° nS P ro 8 ramin g syndicated film shows 

■ LtUWIUIUIl- underway since sponsor's grew, exactly matching the decline in feature film. Like 

survey for the 1955 "Buyers' Guide to Station Program- radio, television stations are emphasizing appeal to special- 

ing." The percentage of stations airing local homemaker ized audience groups. Note percentage of stations in chart 

shows dropped. Feature film, though still programed by below which program for farm or other special audiences, 

the vast majority of stations, showed a decline. But the (1956 data based on replies to date from 320 stations.) 

THERE'S BIG SHIFT UNDERWAY IN TELEVISION PROGRAMING 

% STATIO NS PROCRAMINC 
'955 1956 -56 VS. '55 

Some time daily 95% 87% —8 

Morning 16 19 +3 

" Feature films Afternoon 60 63 f 3 

Early-evening 33 22 —11 

Late-evening 83 81 —2 

Syndicated films Some time daily 82 90 +8 

% STATIONS PROGRAMING % STAT.QNS PRQGRJ . 

1955 1956 56VS ' 55 r?SC2325Hi m5 1956 ' 5l 

s P° rts 34% 29% 5 mtff^£&* Homemaking .... 96% 76% 

(Play-Ly-play) 



Children's 92 90 





Special audiences . . 9 13 +4 

(Some form of specialized programing) 



ib i n$ 




NUtl 



Net affiliation 



94 97 



L| I!\ FEBRUARY 

el956 "Buyers' Guide to 
a>n Programing," pub- 
,hi by Sponsor Services, 
c will be out in Feb- 
3, It provides breakdown 
Imber of hours stations 
,e to each program type. 



vends change pr buying ? 

urvey of all I'. S. stations made for upcoming 1956 "Buyers' Guide 



W% f| W\if\m The pattern in radio programing i> be- 
linl/IUi g mn i n g 1(l stabilize after several years 
of adjustment to changing listener habits tv created. The 
big change shown in chart below is in farm programing. 
Number of stations programing five hours or more for 
the farm audience has been dropping. This does not mean 



the total number of stations programing for farmers has 
fallen sharply. And many stations which make a real spe- 
cialty of farm programing have upped their hours. (Fig- 
ures below, while in general valid for trend analysis, are 
expected to change when all questionnaires are in. 1956 
data based on 1.961 replies to date from U. S., Canada.) 



RADIO PROGRAMING IS GENERALLY STABLE 



% STATIONS PROCRAMINC 





1954 1955 1956 '56 VS. '55 

Concert music 9% 23% 21 % -2 

(Specialists. 10 hrs. or more) 

Farm 41 31 18 -13 

(5 hrs. or more) 

Foreign 19 17 20 +3 

(Other than Mftx. -American) 

Mex.-American 7 7 7 

(U. S. stations only) 

9 - J#" ; 

\s^i Ne g ro 25 29 28 _1 

Popular 8 12 13 +1 

(75 hrs. or more) 

rln R^ion 6 " 16 -1 

L'U.l^Al^a (10 hrs. or more) 






NOTE: THESE ARE 
BUT A FEW OF THE 
PROGRAMING BREAK- 
DOWNS COVERED IN 
"buyers' GUIDE." 



LAST-MINUTE 
REMINDER FOR 
STATIONS 

if you haven't yet 
returned your 
questionnaire to 
sponsor's "buyers' 
guide," this is 
your last chance to 
do so before presstime. 
questionnaires still 
out should be rushed 
to sponsor air mail 

AT 40 E. 49TH ST.. 
NEW YORK 17, N. Y. 




Glossary below was gathered when SPONSOR 

researched just-concluded series on agency marketing services 

'28 Nov.-9 Jan. issues). Write for reprints of series and glossary 

The jargon of marketing 

You're not hep if you can't drop a few of these phrases 






The expansion of marketing services in the agency field has infiltrated the Madison 
and Michigan avenue precincts with a new species of vernacular. Some of these trade 
terms are technical in nature, while others are strictly replacements for good old 
Anglo-Saxon standby's. To help make it easier for the "advertising man" to dig some 
of the marketing jargon, SPONSOR has compiled the folloiving list of hep usages. 



Attitude, reason the wholesaler, dealer, or consumer, 
likes, no-likes, or is plainly untouched. 

Auditing of results, check-up on what's happened in 
distribution, sales, and other marketing factors. 

Backyard marketer, he concentrates his sales effort 
in a limited or local area rather than the natron. 

Brand distribution checks, like percentages of sales 
among chains vs. independent outlets. 

Client confidence, "he likes the way we carry 
through," is what this one boils down to. 

Communication of prestige, phrase for "we're the 
tops in our product or service field." 

Consumer brand preference studies, how and 

why the consumers take to one brand. 

Consumer panels, groups of consumers consulted 
on various categories of consumer products. 

Continuing profile, where sales prospects live geo- 
graphically, income, age, sex, education, occupation. 

External influences, such as market and competitive 
forces reported on a product or brand. 

Geographical spread, the combined markets for the 
introduction or distribution of a product. 

Grocery store audits, check of the stock on hand. 

H amortization, put in its earthy aspect or perspec- 
tive vs. treating it from a dry, statistical viewpoint. 

In-depth expansion of market, trying to get more 
sales volume out of a concentrated, or limited area. 

Intelligence, often a substitute word for "report." 

Internal influences, used in marketing forecasting 
and referring to manufacturer's own distribution 
and sales planning, potentials and goals. 

Margin-dollar concept, the "narrowest gap between 
the actual appropriation for sales effort and the ideal 
amount; what might be termed a "tolerance factor." 



Market mix, the ideal ingredients for the successful 
marketing of a product; term introduced by Albert W. 
Frey, a Dartmouth professor. 

Mass market, the broad market in contrast to the 
class or selective one; also used to distinguish the 
"national" from the "regional" market. 

Pilot market, where you try the product out on a 
more or less cursory basis; whereas in a "test mar- 
ket" you're much more thorough in your distribution 
and sampling efforts, to the end that the results are 
much more projectible. 

Plan of action, we're going to do it via these steps 
and methods as set forth in this prospectus. 

Pre-sell, the mushrooming of the self-service type of 
retailing has made this one of the most used terms in 
the marketer's lexicon referring to advertising media, 
techniques used to sell the consumer in advance. 

Problem areas, we've got trouble distributing or sell- 
ing our product there. 

Product image, the consumer's own ideas and re- 
action to the product. 

Purchase and use patterns, habits of buying and 
product-using by the consumer. 

Push markets, the advertiser's list of primary and 
selective markets; these now frequently conform to the 
station line-up the advertiser is able to obtain from 
the tv network plus spot buys in the missing links; in 
other words, instead of building his tv campaign 
around a pre-selected list of markets, the advertiser 
harnesses his list of "push markets" to the tv markets 
available to him. 

Related-item promotion, tie-in of one product with 
another for a single package sale; such as a cheese 
brand with a cracker brand. 

Stimulation devices and incentive programs, for 

the consumer it might be a "this coupon ^and 5<£" gim- 
mick and for the salesman a prize trip to Bermuda. 






• BIG PICTURE: Film distribution business may bit tbe $100 
million mark in 1956. Tbis would be a 25% jump over 1955. 
Top trends include: more multi-market buys, flood of new fea- 
ture films released by Hollywood PAGE 29 

• FILM FACTS: In addition to being showmen, horse traders, 
researchers, prophets, film buyers must know a lot about the syn- 
dication business. Here are the facts PAGE 44 

• BIG QUESTIONS: There are 14 most-frequently-asked ques- 
tions by buyers. They are asked and answered on PAGE 46 

• HELP WANTED : Admen want certain things from syndicators. 
They include logical pricing, more research PAGE 51 

• CASE HISTORIES : How four typical multi-market film clients 
bought shows and how they fared with them is described in this 
story. The clients include two breweries, an oil firm, a baking 
company, all with differing objectives PAGE 52 



• RESEARCH: This includes a comparison of station use of syn- 
dicated feature film this year and last, a tip on where advertiser's 
can get clearances and some audience composition data.... PAGE 56 



SECTION 



There's a lot you have to know 
to buy syndicated film 

Here are facts on programs, pricing, clearances, merchandising, ratings 



Ji here are few businesses that re- 
quire as much savvy as the syndicated 
film business. The buyer of such film 
must be a combination showman, 
horse trader, research expert, prophet. 
Besides that, he should know a helluva 
lot about the syndication business. 
There's a helluva lot to know. There's 
a staggering amount of product avail- 
able, for one thing. If the syndication 
business offers nothing else, it offers 
a variety of programing. It offers, of 
course, a great deal else. 

Programing: Heart of the syndica- 
tion film business is the half-hour 
show. The half-hour show is long 
enough to provide a substantial show- 



case for almost any advertiser and 
not so long that it's prohibitively ex- 
pensive or hard to find time for. 

A survey by ABC Film Syndication 
last summer came up with these facts. 
There were almost 200 available half- 
hour series. The total is even larger 
now. Nearly 150 of them were in six 
categories — general drama, adventure, 
mystery, comedy, musical variety and 
children, in descending numerical or- 
der. In addition there were Westerns, 
sport shows, documentaries, education- 
al stanzas, quiz shows and other types. 

There are also, of course, shows of 
other lengths. While they are less 
important from the sales point of view, 
their total number is greater than that 



of the conventional half-hour films. 

At the beginning of 1955, according 
to a tabulation of SRDS material, 
there were well over 6,000 "features" 
in syndication, not counting shorts. 
Since that time another 1,000 features 
and 4,000 shorts have come into or 
will shortly come into distribution. 
The total feature list contains films of 
all descriptions and, unquestionably, 
a large number are pretty poor pro- 
gram material. However, as tv has 
grown, the quality of feature films re- 
leased for video consumption has im- 
proved considerably. 

Millions are being spent on new 
made-for-tv film for 1956. While 
there is no outstanding trend, there 



Variety of syndicated sh< 





Sf£) 



Documentary: Guild's punchy "Confidential 
File" gets added boost from interest shown 
by civic groups in social problem stories 



New show: NBC Film's "Crunch 
and Des" is one of two recent 
shows taken from series run 
Saturday Evening Post" 




Strip: Term does not refer 
to costume of Gale Storm in 
"My Little Margie" but fact 
stations are stripping Official 
show and others 



tn 



appears to be a continuation of em- 
phasis on stories, as opposed to musi- 
cals, and there is a noticeable accent 
on costume drama. 

Here's a sampling of new titles, 
with descriptions of some of them. 

TPA: Tugboat Annie, a series taken 
from the well-known stories run in the 
Saturday Evening Post. (This is the 
second syndicated show which de- 
veloped from a Saturday Evening Post 
series in recent months, NBC Film 
having released Crunch and Des dur- 
ing 1955's last quarter.) TPA's use 
of an audience-proven name is no ac- 
cident. Proved audience appeal is 
considered a sina qua non by most 
syndicators in deciding on a show. 
They seldom gamble. 

Screen Gems: Commitments are in 
for four new shows. They are Circus 
Boy, Criminal Code, Emergency and 
The Web. Emergency is a hospital 
story. Also proposed by the firm are 
/ Shoot the News, stories about two 
competitive newsreel cameramen, Mys- 
tery Writers Theatre, Tales of the 
Bengal Lancers and Prowl Car. 

Official: The Three Musketeers; 
Buccaneer, story of a pirate hunter; 
Captain Rogers of Her Majesty's Navy 
and A Knight of the Round Table, the 
latter character based on the Sir Lance- 
lot legend with an apprentice knight 



written into the story for appeal to 
the younger set. 

CBS Film: Richard the Lion-Heart- 
ed, Border Patrol, Legionnaire, and 
Man from the Islands. 

Pricing: Syndicated film would be 
difficult to price under the best of 
conditions. In today's competitive 
market, the factors that determine 
price are multiplied so that each case 
sometimes presents a different prob- 
lem. The film buyer, however, should 
be familiar with the basic facts be- 
hind pricing so that he's well prepared 
for arguments and counter-arguments 
when the bargaining sessions begin. 

Not all pricing is complicated. 
When the syndicator sells a show for 
network exposure, the problem is fair- 
ly simple. He sets a profit above his 
production cost that takes into ac- 
count competitive prices, potential 
rating and, in the event he has some- 
thing special in the way of talent or 
ideas, how much extra the sponsor 
will pay for a personality or a promo- 
table program that just fits the spon- 
sor's current sales problem. 

A first-run multi-market deal with 
a large lineup of stations is practical- 
ly the same as a network sale so far 
as the syndicator is concerned. In 
some cases the question of expected 



clearances will affect the price. The 
syndicator takes less, of course, for 
network or large multi-market sales 
since his sales costs are lower than 
they would be for syndication sales. 
While there are no cut-and-dried dis- 
count formulas for buying more sta- 
tions, in effect the buyer gets a dis- 
count for a greater lineup. Here, again, 
the film distributor is willing to give 
a discount because of his savings in 
syndication sales costs. 

In syndication pricing, the distribu- 
tor thinks something like this: He 
takes his show cost, adds to it his 
expected sales cost, which may run 
from 25 to 40% of production cost. 
He may or may not add a profit for 
the first run. Then he lists the mar- 
kets in which he feels he can sell his 
show and prices each market accord- 
ing to its percent of the total tv satu- 
ration. For example, if market "A" 
represents 3% of the total tv circula- 
tion, the syndicator will change 3% 
of the total first run gross to that mar- 
ket. (There are other formulas, how- 
ever, or instances where the formula 
is varied on the basis of supply and 
demand.) 

One syndicator, whose shows run 
about $30-35,000 per episode, figures 
on a return of $45-50,000 for the first 
(Please turn to page 62) 



ers chance to pinpoint audience 





Kids: Shows for tots are 
staple of film business. 
Above, Screen Gems' "Jet 
Jackson, Flying Commando 



Movie: "Great Expectations" is 
one of ABC Film's movie package. 
Feature films loom big in 1956 



In person: Star tours 
give show extra impact. 
Above, Preston Foster 
of MCA TV's "Waterfront' 



14 questions admen ask before hup 

These are basic questions with highlight answers. Use them as a checklist 



Q. How can you judge ratings potential of a film 
show and the type of audience it will pull? 

A. Whether it's an established show or a new one, you 
can see a couple or more sample episodes before 
you buy. The type of show you buy dictates time 
periods you'll consider and the audience you'll get. 
If it's a show which has already been on the air, you 
can study the ratings and audience composition 
figures. You have to carefully assess the kind of 
opposition the show has had. Maybe it's poten- 
tially a tremendous audience success but has been 
in against overpowering competition. If it's a new 
show, you have to examine the track records of 
similar shows of the type. Plus the general record 
of the syndicator. Plus your judgment based on 
careful inspection of sample episodes and plot out- 
lines. As in any carefully thought out program buy, 
a big factor should be the particular audience 
appeal of the show balanced against the type of 
consumer who buys your products or services. 

Q. What kind of clearances can you hope to get? 

A. Part of the answer to this one depends on the show 
you pick. You're ahead of the game if it's a strong 
property. Your timebuyer will have a talking point 
with stations. Don't be frightened away from syndi- 
cated film because announcement schedules are 
tough to get into Class "A." Shows are different. 
SPONSOR studied time clearances of dozens of multi- 
market film advertisers. Most of these were able to 
buy Class "A" time cross the country. It's a process 
of negotiation in which the knowhow of your time- 
buyer is all-important. Often your show will sell 
better for you in a programing block appealing to 
a particular rather than a general mixed audience. 
Stations are anxious to cooperate with spot film 
clients. Reason: They're always on the look-out for 
strong programing to build up their own schedules 
and ratings against competitors. 

Q. What's the right price for each market? 

A. This isn't completely standard. Syndicators arrive 
at prices by different formulas. You may pay more 
for one market than you think its size warrants but 
on the over-all price you may find a favorable bal- 
ance has been achieved. The only way you can 
judge program costs is against prices quoted for 
other shows of comparable quality and against the 
production values. The wise buyer will shop around 
to get price perspective even if he is sold in advance 
on a particular property to see how pricing works. 



Q. How can you promote a show to the publt 
and among dealers and retailers? 

Mb If you start by asking this question, you're on th 
right track. Too many advertisers put a film she 
on the air and do very little more. But most fib 
shows provide tremendous opportunities for promc 
tion. The film syndicators generally will furnis 
merchandising material at cost. This can be a goo. 
starting point. But it's up to the agency and adve 
"tiser to design a promotion campaign which fit 
their own needs. The big advantage of a multi 
market film campaign as opposed to an announce 
ment campaign is that it gives you something dra 
matic to talk to your trade about. Whether it's b> 
meetings or mailings the objective should be t< 
make sure everyone concerned knows you are nov 
identified with an important program of your own, 

Q« Will there be more product available it wi 
want to renew the program next year? 

Aa If it's a show that's selling well from a well-estab- 
lished syndicator, the chances are good there'll be a 
second year of production. If you're not buying a 
big spread of markets, naturally there's a chance the 
same show won't be available to you the following 
year. A big multi-market buy to someone else may 
include your markets and options for renewals 
aren't the rule. Of course if you're in many markets 
with the show you don't face this danger. But in 
any case, once you've got good time there should be 
no difficulty finding worthwhile shows the second 
year. There's plenty of product of every type to 
choose from today if you take the time to look 

Q. Are we protected from overlapping coverage? 

A. Make sure your contract stipulates exclusivity in 
the complete coverage area of stations used if at all 
possible. In particular, watch out for competing 
products using the same show in markets adjacent 
to your own. This is, of course, one situation the 
syndicator is anxious to avoid. Why antagonize 
two buyers? But you should negotiate as well to see 
that your own identification with the show is kept 
as exclusive as possible, where markets are close. 

Q « Can we get the star to make appearances? 

A. This is subject to individual negotiation with the 
syndicator. Already-established appearance sched- 
ules at the time you buy will be a big factor in 
determining what you can hope for. It's best to try 



indicated film 

m you buy syndicated film 



To gather the questions and answers set forth below, 
SPONSOR went to agencies and advertisers, asking: What are 
the questions you raise before buying a syndicated film 
program?" From a list of 30 or more questions, sponsor 
culled these 14 as most basic and most frequently asked. 
They appear in order of importance. Answers come from 
admen as well as advice offered by syndicators themselves. 



to seek a clear-cut understanding as to what you're 
going to get. But even the best-intentioned syndi- 
cator can't control the situation if the star becomes 
overloaded with commitments. One tip :If you find 
that a market near yours is on the star's schedule, 
you may be able to make an arrangement to pay 
for a tour of your market, provided the star's will- 
ing and doesn't have conflicting prior commitments. 

i Will syndicators make commercials for you 
starring talent in the program? 

i Some will, some won't. Those that do set a low 
price, provided production is underway. If you 
don't need new commercials, you may want to buy 
lead-ins done by the star. Naturally you don't want 
to have the star doing the commercials if you feel 
his personality isn't in keeping with your message. 
This can well be the case even though the audience 
he delivers is entirely suitable to your product. 

Q. How do you know the quality of a show will 
stand up after the first few episodes? 

As You don't. Most buyers screen only a few episodes. 
All may not be in the can at the time of purchase. 
But conditions have changed since the early days of 
film syndication. If you deal with an established 
firm, you have plenty of basis for expecting gener- 
ally even quality. Naturally some episodes will be 
stronger than others. But it isn't likely that several 
shows will be loaded with production values and the 
rest skimpy. Look at story outlines and budget. 

Q. Are you faced with extra traffic problems in 
setting up schedules, shipping film? 

A. The most time-consuming problem is that of nego- 
tiating X number of separate schedules and con- 
tracts with X number of stations. There's the threat 
of time preemptions by network shows particularly. 
But these disadvantages are balanced by greater 
flexibility in choice of markets and stations. Also 
the less expensive time period often bought com- 
pensate for extra cost of man-hours expended in 
getting clearances. Shipping of prints is not a 
major cost factor whether the shipping is handled 
by the syndicator himself or by an outside service. 

Q. What research is available to evaluate the film 
once I have it on the air? 

A» Syndicators are very research-conscious these days. 
They provide potential buyers with various types of 
competitive data, such as studies showing how par- 



ticular program categories have done in various 
markets. The research services themselves have a 
great deal of data to guide buyers: e.g. a Nielsen 
study of shows in various categories which went 
into syndication after network exposure proved 
that there's generally a very minor decline in audi- 
ence even in major markets. Once the program 
is on the air, the client can get an idea of his share 
of audience and other factors from various local re- 
search services like ARB, Nielsen, Pulse, Videodex. 

Q. When are third and fourth reruns a good buy? 

A« With the opening up of new tv markets, reruns are 
becoming an increasingly good buy for areas that 
might not have had tv at the time of the show's 
first and second run. And in top metropolitan mar- 
kets as well such shows can do a good job. No 
show saturates the audience the first time around. 
Pricing of reruns can be less complicated than the 
pricing of a first-run, since the client has a fair 
yardstick for estimating his potential audience on 
basis of its past performance in a specific market. 

Q. Is it best to buy the same film property for all 
the markets in your tv lineup? 

A* Philosophies differ on this. Some admen feel that 
the best way to take advantage of syndicated film 
is to key the program buy to the local taste. In 
that way, they claim, the client is getting maximum 
benefit from the flexibility syndicated film can pro- 
vide. Of course, putting the same series into all 
markets has obvious advantages in terms of promo- 
tion, possible price discounts for bulk purchases, 
unified shipping and traffic. Usually, multi-market 
film buyers in 20 or more markets tend to buy one 
property to get the discount and promotion advan- 
tages. Smaller clients with scattered markets are 
often more confined in programs available to them, 
hence suit programs to each market individually. 

Q. Can I get program rebates if a station pre- 
empts my time? 

A. Usually not. Stations will offer make-goods and 
syndicators are generally willing to extend contracts 
to allow for such make-goods. Problems can de- 
velop if the syndicator has sold the next cycle of 
your show to another sponsor in the market where 
you need a make-good. But adjustments can often 
be worked out even then. * * * 




48 



SPONSOR 



Tower 



low 316,000 watts 



(1685 feet above average terrain) 




Check These Fabulous Facts: 



Population (39 Texas and 3 

Oklahoma Counties) 2,272,600 



Urban 
Rural 



. . . 1,603,900 
. . . 668,700 



Effective Buyin 

Income . . . $3,477,072,000 

Retail Sales . . $2,582,192,000 

(Source: Sales Management Survey Of 
Buying Power, May 10, 1955) 

SET COUNT .... 552,740 



A Television Service of 

The Dallas Morning News 

Ralph Nimmons, Station Manager 

Edward Petry & Co., National Representatives 

mmm 



I 



51 Ft. Taller 

than the 

EMPIRE 
STATE BLDG. 



23 JANUARY 1956 



49 




EVERY 



TV Viewer 



. . in 



EVERY x 



V Home 



. . . in Ed X liR I T V Market 



can enjoy at least one of our 
great film programs EVERY week! 






National Network 



Ford Theatre presented by Ford Motor Company 

Adventures of Rin Tin Tin presented by 
National Biscuit Company 

Father Knows Best presented by Scott Paper Company 

Damon Runyon Theatre presented by Anheuser-Busch 

Tales of the Texas Rangers presented by General Mills 

Captain Midnight presented by Wander Company 



National Syndication 



Celehrity Playhouse 

Jungle Jim 

All Star Theatre 

Top Plays of 1956 

Jet Jackson 

Big Playback 



National Snot 



Falstaff Celebrity Playhouse presented by Falstaff Brewing 
The Patti Page Show presented by Oldsmobile - 



5- 



3r ^ 




E N 




Inc. 



TELEVISION SUBSIDIARY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES CORP. 

233 WEST 49TH STREET NEW YORK 19. N Y 
CIRCLE S-5044- 



50 



SPONSOR 



What admen want 
from film syndicate 

Product's good, plentiful, agencymen say; time 
clearances, film pricing make buying job hard 






m he product's fine, admen agree. 
Never before have so many film prop- 
erties been available to advertisers, 
both proved successes with track rec- 
ords on the networks, and new shows. 
There's a wide range of program types 
available from historical romances to 
Westerns to drama to situation comedv. 
And as budgets have gone up, produc- 
tion values and quality have generally 
improved as well. 

However, after praising svndicators 
for the job they've done, admen tend 




to get to areas in which they feel syndi- 
cators could make it easier for agencies 
and clients to buy their properties. 
Here are four big points admen made: 

Time clearance. The sydicators can 
be very helpful in clearing the tough- 
est hurdle for film buyers — time. And 
agency men cite numerous examples of 
cases where svndicators have done just 
that. The feeling is there's need for 
more effort on part of film sellers to 
come up with availabilities to clients 






before selling the show. It's an impor- 
tant part of creative selling, admen feel. 

A medium-sized agency recently was 
impressed by a syndicator's effort in 
New York, reportedly among the 
toughest markets to clear. The agency 
has a home furnisings client who 
needed a merchandisable vehicle in 
New York where his competitors are 
strongest, a prestige film property that 
client salesmen could use to give their 
product trade stature. 

The agency radio-tv man called four 
major syndicators for a list of avail- 
able properties, while the media de- 
partment went to work on checking 
clearances. After just a few screen- 
ings, agency and client both decided 
on a film property that wasn't in New 
York at the moment. Time clearance 
was another problem. 

At this point the syndicator went to 
work. His salesman found out one of 
the top two stations had an alternate- 
week sponsor on the air during an 
early-evening period and would listen 
to a potential weekly client with a good 
property. Within hours the station 
gave the alternate-week client an ulti- 
matum to go weekly, with the under- 
( Please turn to page 70) 



FILM SELLERS: IMPROVE IN THESE AREAS, ADMEN ASK 



► 



Toughest hurdle for film buyers is time clear- 
ance and feeling is that there's big need for more 
organized effort to aid clients on availabilities. 
Should be closer liaison among syndicator, sta- 
tion and agency on problem to aid early solution. 



Price structure must be standardized, agency- 
men agree. Too much variation between markets 
of comparable size. This type pricing tends to 
undermine whole film price structure. Should 
be less of "what traffic will bear" type thinking. 



Specific promotion on station level should be 
provided, less of the generalized blanket type. 
All agencies need promotion help from syndica- 
tors. This is agreed. But greater creativity should 
be put into the individual promotion campaign. 



Greater research effort would bring greater 
sales, agency people agree. Also, there ought 
to be more specific research in markets where 
client will operate. Research adds credence to 
film seller's claims, helps impress agencymen. 






23 JANUARY 1956 



51 



4 multi-market film case histories 

The station lineups range from 44 markets to six, hut eaeh client gets 
low-cost identification plus top programing, support from dealers 



B he very flexibility of film syndica- 
tion accounts for the fact that every 
advertiser buys it differently. There 
are the national advertisers with huge 
network station lineups who buy a few 
markets via syndicated film for a fill- 
in. There are the strictly local clients 
who take a film show and build the 
weight of an entire campaign around it. 
For some advertisers syndicated film 
is a completely national venture cover- 
ing over 100 markets. But the most 
typical syndicated film clients among 
national and regional advertisers are 
those buying in from four to 40 mar- 
kets. The four case histories assembled 
here concentrate on advertisers in this 
class. It's a class destined to grow. The 
trend is to more multi-market film. 

Phillips Petroleum: Phillips turned 
to syndicated films over four years ago 
I through Lambert and Feasley, New 
York I because its distribution area, 
though geographically huge, comprises 
only some 35% of all U.S. tv sets. Be- 
fore buying a show, the client and 
agency screened over 200 different 
properties. Frank Mace, agency ac- 
count executive, John Bates, radio-tv 
director, and Phillips' Fred Rice, man- 
ager of the oil firm's advertising de- 
partment, agreed on Ziv's / Led Three 
Lives. Today the client has this show 
in 44 markets, another Ziv property, 
Science Fiction Theater, in one mar- 
ket. 

"The fact that we've renewed our 
contract year after year and expanded 
our schedules is one proof that the 
show has been successful for us,'" 
Frank Mace told sponsor. 

Client and agency both applied sev- 
eral criteria to their choice before mak- 
ing a final decision four years ago. 

The best potential Phillips customers 
are adults, of course and proportion- 
ately more men than women, although 
the company wants to reach both. / 
I Please turn to page 76 I 




PHILLIPS PETROLEUM CO. 

Phillips has regional distribution. Firm picked 
/ Led Three Lives for its headline value and broad, 
national appeal. Schedules were improved while 
show was on the air, so that it's now on in prime 
evening time. Alternate week operations cut costs 




GUNTHER BREWING 



Client advertises in five markets only, has small 
budget, seasonal campaigns. Agency overcame this 
hurdle by picking films to suit local taste: Water- 
front along the sea coast. Town and Country for 
inland towns. Ratings have been growing nicely 




NATIONAL BIS CUIT CO. 

Nabisco has many products, each needing individ- 
ual push in different markets. McCann provides 
impact by buying alternate-week sponsorship of films 
on air, when show and time available smts client. 
Nabisco co-sponsors Three Lives in 8 markets 




LIEBMANN BREWERIES 

Rheingold bought Fairbanks Presents from the start 
for star's prestige value, show quality. Brewer gets 
maximum show identification by using star in 
commercials. Agency bu) s station option time 
following strong network lineups for peak audience 




52 



SPONSOR 



catalog of hits 




Rating histories and market availabilities on request. 
Contact your nearest office of 

ABC FILM SYNDICATION, Inc. 

10 East 44-th Street, New York • OXford T-5880 

New York • Chicago • Hollywood • Atlanta • Dallas • San Francisco • New England (Westfield, Mass.) 
23 JANUARY 1 956 53 




for AUDIENCE IMPACT. .. SALESMANSHIP... 

and TOP PRODUCT IDENTIFICATION 

you can't beat . . . 





starring GERTRUDE BERG 
and the famous GOLDBERG FAMILY 

39 NEW half-hour shows 

NEW STORY LINE . . . warmer and more entertaining 
than ever before. 

NEW SETTINGS . . . Molly's new home in the 
heart of Suburban America. 

NEW SITUATIONS . with Molly making friends with 
all her new small town neighbors. 



EVERYBODY LOVES MOLLY 




...and now that same warm affection can be carried 
over to your product when you sponsor this great 
family show. The simple and endearing personality 
that is MOLLY surrounds your sales messages with 
the kind of sincere impact that can't be duplicated 
by any other program ... of any type. Now, after 



GUILD 




twenty-five years of national sponsorship, the show 
has a brand-new title and a bright new format. It's 
ready to go to work for your product immediately 
in just the markets you choose . . . but you'll have to act 
fast, before the cities you want are gone! Write, 
wire or phone today for audition reel and prices. 



FILMS 



COMPANY, INC. 



460 PARK AVENUE • NEW YORK 22, NEW YORK • MUrray Hill 8-5365 
IN CANADA: S. W. CALDWELL, LTD. 





4 MORE GUILD 



CHECK THESE SKYROCKETING 
NEW YORK A. R. B. RATINGS: 




SEPT. 



OCT. 



NOV. 



DEC. 



"QUITE A SALESGIRL, THIS MOLLY..." 

. . . Says Peck Advertising Agency, speaking for its client, Old Dutch 
Coffee, which reports enthusiastic reaction from all its dealers since it 
began sponsoring this program last October. Incidentally, ratings for 
MOLLY's time-slot, which were 1.5 before the show's debut, have now 
climbed to 11.7 . . . bringing the show's cost-per-thousand down to only 
$2.67 per commercial minute. 




I SPY 



Distinguished actor, 
RAYMOND MASSEY, pre- 
sents true and exciting 
stories behind history's 
most famous spies. 39 half- 
hour . . . mystery, intrigue, 
adventure. Sponsored in 
over 60 markets. 



CONFIDENTIAL FILE 



Paul Coates' behind-the- 
scenes report on America 
. . . with penetrating close- 
ups of its people and prob- 
lems. A new and exciting 
concept in dramatized 
journalism. The H-hour 
show all America is talking 
about . . . winning fabulous 
ratings in over 100 markets. 



15 minutes with 

FRANKIE LAINE 




an 



dC 



He 



onnie names 




All the 'star' entertainment 
quality of a Mi-hour show 
packed into 15 fast-moving 
minutes. Ideal choice for 
small advertisers who want 
the impact of a H-hour 
show on a 15-minute 
budget. Top-rated show in 
its time-slot over WCBS- 
TV, New York. 



the LIBER ACE show 



Television's most widely 
acclaimed musical series 
for the third consecutive 
year. Still a few choice 
availabilities, and you're 
in luck if one of them hap- 
pens to be in your market) 




GUILD 




FILMS 



460 PARK AVENUE • NEW YORK 22, NY 
MURRAY HILL 8-5365 
IN CANADA: S. W. CALDWELL, LTD. 



FILM FITS MD FIGURES 



1. Are stations using more or less syndicated firm today? 



Figures at right, taken from sponsor's 1955 
and 1956 "Buyers' Guide," show percent of 
U.S. tv stations using syndicated film. This 
trend indicates, among other things, less reliance 
by stations on local programing since network 
shows are being used more and more, especially 
in small markets. Oddly enough, increase of 
web shows in small markets have helped syndi- 
cators, since web shows strengthen stations, make 
them more desirable for many national clients. 



1955 



1956 




82% 



92% 






2. What percent of U. S. stations program feature fi'm today? 



Trend indicated by figures at right, taken from 
sponsor's 1955 and 1956 "Buyers' Guide," may 
be temporary. Decrease is probably due to fact 
that much feature film has exhausted rerun 
potentialities. However, flood of new features, 
especially those to be released by C & C Super 
and Columbia Pictures, will undoubtedly result 
in more feature film time on stations and may 
affect market for half-hour syndicated films. 
Many new features, however, will replace old. 



1955 



35% 



1956 




87% 



3. Where is there room for more syndicated fifm on the air? 



As interpreted by NBC Film Division, which 
prepared ratings at right, there is room for 
syndicated film during the 10:00-11:00 p.m. 
slots outside Eastern time zone. Because of 
time differential, web shows are not commonly 
run after 10:00 p.m. outside Eastern zone. 
Low ratings in right-hand list of markets, says 
NBC, reflect use of many local shows. This 
gives opportunity for syndicator and national 
spot client to clear time in Midwest, Mountain 
and Pacific Coast markets. (There's some re- 
broadcasting of web shows in West at late hour.) 



AVERAGE 10:00-11:00 p.m. SUN.-SAT. RATINGS 



EASTERN TIME 

Atlanta 

Baltimore 

Boston 

Cincinnati 

Cleveland 

Columbus 

Dayton 

Detroit 

New York 

Philadelphia 

Washington 

Source: ARB, Dec. 



ZONE 

.16.9 

.17.8 

23.6 

18.0 

18.9 

15.9 

.22.3 

12.0 

...... 7.8* 

.17.4 
12.5 

'55 



CENTRAL, MOUNTAIN, 
AND PACIFIC TIME ZONES 

Chicago 10.1 

Los Angeles 6.0* 

Minn.-St. Paul 8.6 

Mobile 9.9 

San Francisco _ 11.7 

Seattle-Tacoma 9.1 

Springfield, Mo. .13.5 
Tucson 15.9 

*Average ratings are unusually 
low in New York and Los An- 
geles becauss the audience is 
split between seven stations. 



56 



SPONSOR 



TOP-RATED FACILITIES. ..TO PRODUCE 
YOUR TOP-RATED TELEVISION FILM! 




OPTICAL EFFECTS 




HAL ROACH Stud**. 

CULVER CITY, CALIFORNIA 

11 All Operations Under One Roof" 

HAL ROACH, Jr., President 

SIDNEY S. VAN KEUREN, Vice President -General Manager 



FILM FACTS AND FIGURES (continued) 






4. How does audience composition vary with the film program type? 



Is the audience of an adventure show confined to kids? 
Do adults watch Westerns? The figures below are your 
answer to these and other questions. They show that even 
with a program which you'd earmark as primarily aimed 
at the younger set, you frequently attain a high percentage 
of adult audience. The audience composition figures shown 
here are from American Research Bureau's November 1955 
reports in six major U. S. markets: New York, Chicago, 
Los Angeles, Dallas-Ft. Worth, St. Louis and Atlanta. 
Figures shown below are the average for as many markets 



as the show listed reaches. While the figures are a good 
general indication of the kind of varied audience you can 
attain with syndicated film shows, they can't be used as a 
buying guide for individual shows. A show with high 
adult audience in the chart below may conceivably pull 
well with children as well — if you slot it at the right 
time. Before buying, check markets where the show is 
aired at a time most suitable for your audience. That 
will tell you approximately how the show will pull for 
you in similar time periods and that's what really counts. 



COMPOSITION OF AUDIENCE 







COMPOSITION OF AUDIENCE 



Westerns 

RANGE RIDER 19 19 61 

ANNIE OAKLEY 20 20 60 

WILD BILL HICKOK 20 25 51 

KIT CARSON 20 22 57 

CISCO KID 22 24 54 

Adventure 

SUPERMAN 18 22 59 

WATERFRONT 31 38 31 

RAMAR OF THE JUNGLE 22 30 48 

HIGHWAY PATROL 49 40 21 

FOREIGN INTRIGUE 41 49 9 

Mystery 

BADGE 714 35 48 16 

I LED THREE LIVES 31 47 21 

RACKET SQUAD . 40 44 16 

CITY DETECTIVE 36 56 8 

MR. DISTRICT ATTORNEY 41 51 8 

ELLERY QUEEN 29 43 28 

58 
















Sir nation Comedy 

ABBOTT & COSTELLO 20 25 55 

AMOS & ANDY 44 37 28 

GREAT GILDERSLEEVE 25 44 31 

MY LITTLE MARGIE 22 35 42 



Drama 

DOUGLAS FAIRBANKS PRESENTS 



51 54 12 



STORIES OF THE CENTURY 


30 36 34 


STUDIO 57 


... 34 57 8 



Children's Shows 

HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSON 



17 20 63 



* LITTLE RASCALS 14 19 66 

Music 

GUYLOMBARDO 31 39 30 

LIBERACE 37 53 10 

GRAND OLE OPRY 24 40 26 

Sports 

CHAMPIONSHIP BOWLING 45 49 6 



SPONSOR 



i iin'Mm 



f ■ ■ ■ "P ■ ■ - ■ h - ----- 

t p a programs are 



t 

Lmj-ui 


op 

UlllflTTTTl 


s 



The Billboard Scoreboard * 



• Syndicated Him Adventure Shows 




• Web Adventure Shows 

1. Lassie, Campbell Soup 
Kellogg (CBS) 

AMONG CHILDREN 

1. Fury, Cen. Foods (NBC) 




and now, climbing overnight, 
t pa 's newest [tjojpj program 

MONTE CRISTO 



co-starring GEORGE DOLENZ and NICK CRAVAT 



The new, exciting "TPA Tops" costume-adventure series, based on the greatest selling novel 
of all time. Racking up top ratings wherever it's playing . . . 

San Francisco 24.1' outrating "$64,000 Question" 

Buffalo 18.5' San Diego 25 3' 



Norfolk 



41. 8 ? 



Albuquerque 20.3' 



•The Billboard, Dec. 17, 1955 

1 November Videodex 

2 November Pulse 



sold in 59 top markets 

for such top advertisers as Montgomery Ward, United Gas, Maison Blanche, Pepsi Cola, 
New England Bakeries, W. P. Fuller & Co., Petri Wine. 
Some choice markets still available. Wire us collect today to have your TPA representative call. 



Television Programs of America, Inc. 



brings you the Top Programs of America 



NEW YORK 477 MADISON AVE. • CHICAGO: 360 N. MICHIGAN AVE . LOS ANGEIES: 5746 SUNSET BIV. 



23 IANUARY 1956 



59 




CRUNCH 



This brand-new series of 39 half-hour films is proving as popular 
with sponsors as the Philip Wylie CRUNCH and DES stories have 
been with readers of the POST for 17 years. And no wonder! 
They're wonderful stories of drama, romance, action, comedy, 
adventure... all realistically filmed on location in colorful Bermuda. 
Everything about this series adds up to a great popular success! 




and DES 



starring 

FORREST TUCKER 



Your markets may still be available, but don't delay. 
Call or wire for an audition print... today. 

BC FILM DIVISION 

SERVING ALL SPONSORS. ..SERVING ALL STATIONS 

30 Rockefeller Plaza, New York 20, N. Y 

Merchandise Mart, Chicago, 111. 

Sunset and Vine Sts., Hollywood, Calif. 

In Canada: RCA Victor, 225 Mutual St., Toronto; 1551 Bishop St., Montreal 



LOT TO KNOW 

(Continued from page 45) 

run in the 120 top markets. This 
covers all costs and yields a neat profit 
beside if sales move briskly and if he 
sells the large metropolitan markets. 

It is important for the syndicator to 
sell the top markets for a number of 
reasons. First of all, the top markets 
account for the lion's share of the 
return and involve less selling cost. 
The syndicator does better when he 
sells the 15 or 20 top markets than if 
he sells 200 small ones which would 
not cover his costs. Secondly, selling 
the top markets is a matter of prestige 
for it is proof his show has appeal in 
the most competitive areas. 

Ideally, the syndicator prices ac- 
cording to the market. The reason is 
obvious. If he must cut his take in 
one market because his film is placed 
on a station with low audiences, it is 
not too easy to shift this loss on to 
other markets since his prices in those 
other markets then might not be com- 
petitive. 

However, the fact remains that svn- 
dicators often find they must take the 
station's rating history into account 
in selling a show to an advertiser. 



One svndicator reports that in pricing 
markets for a multi-station deal, he 
takes into account the "dollar value of 
the market to the advertiser." 

Prices are further complicated by 
reruns. A rough rule-of-thumb is that 
a second run is 759? of the cost of 
the first I Liberace is sold this way) 
while a third run is 50%. However, 
if a show's ratings were better than 
expected during the first run, the syn- 
dicator will tend to keep the price up 
since he then has a good cost-per- 
1,000 story to tell. 

Cost-per-1,000 figures are an im- 
portant factor in all price negotiations, 
especially from the point of view of 
the advertiser. The large advertiser, 
who can avail himself of expert re- 
search advice from his agency, often 
goes deeply into cost-per- 1.000 calcu- 
lations. They are not always the de- 
termining factor, since the merchan- 
dising value and specific audience 
composition appeal of a show have to 
be taken into account, but cost-per- 
1.000 remains important. 

Clearances: Good clearances are 
half the battle in syndication. While 
there is an element of gamble in any 
kind of program buying, there is no 



What's so unusual about 
6000 Sunset Boulevard? 

This: at Song Ad Film-Radio Productions the four prin- 
cipals are not "gentlemen farmers" — farming out mu«ic, 
lyrics, animation. No, sir! Bob, Dan, Del and Larry are 
themselves musicians, ad men, sales experts, and head up 
all key departments. All Song Ad creative work is done at 
6000 Sunset Boulevard. Your radio or TV commercial 
campaign gets the best thought of the top men at Song 
Ads. Just incidentally, the're also top men in the film- 
radio business! 

Production is booming at 6000 Sunset. 
Call us about your upcoming campaigns! 




SONG AD 

FILM-RADIO PRODUCTIONS 
6000 Sunset Blvd. Hollywood 5-6181 

Hollywood 28, Calif. 



question but that when a show is run 
during periods of peak listening it will 
cash in on it to some extent. 

The gleaming target for most syn- 
dicators is thus "A" time. In aiming 
for this they, of cour-e, come up 
against the fact the juiciest periods in 
"A" are network option time. Syndi- 
cators will be the first to admit that 
network option time is one tough bar- 
rier. It is no tougher than it was a 
year ago but it is not any easier, 
either. 

Nevertheless, syndicators and their 
customers have been able to pull off 
excellent clearances as the examples 
below will show: 

Ballantine cleared a list of 24 mar- 
kets for Ziv's Highway Patrol. Of 
these, only two were not in "A" time. 

A recent presentation by ABC Film 
Syndication listed some examples of 
clearances in "tight" markets. Pass- 
port to Danger cleared KDKA, Pitts- 
burgh, at 9:30 p.m. Wednesday while 
Douglas Fairbanks Jr. Presents clear- 
ed the same station on the same day 
an hour earlier. Passport to Danger 
also showed clearances on WAVE-TV, 
Louisville, at 7:30 p.m. Thursday; 
WBTV, Charlotte, N. C, at 8:00 p.m. 
Tuesday, and WFBM-TV, Indianapo- 
lis, at 9:00 p.m. Thursday. The pre- 
sentation also pointed to Racket Squad, 
which had 71% of its clearances be- 
tween 7:30 and 10:30 p.m. 

Lucky Lager cleared a total of 26 
\\ estem markets for NBC Film's 
Crunch and Des. All fell between 
7:00 and 9:30 and in only four mar- 
kets did the show run before 8:00 
p.m. 

ARB and Videodex rating sheets of 
Guild's Confidential File show that 
of 22 markets only one clearance was 
outside "A" time. 

While the burden of clearing time 
usually falls on the agency, the syn- 
dicator stands ready to pitch in and 
help. One advantage the syndicator 
has is that his salesmen are on the 
scene and can help clear time in face- 
to-face discussions with station per- 
sonnel. The syndicator's salesmen are 
also helpful because of their knowl- 
edge of the market, its viewing habits 
and so forth. This means they can 
suggest the best alternative viewing 
periods in the event the period wanted 
is not available. 

Since syndicated sales to advertisers 
often depend on specific clearances, 
the syndicator sometimes takes on the 
major portion of the job. CBS Film 



62 



SPONSOR 




63 



23 JANUARY 1956 



Sales says it can deliver a 100% 
clearance list in three months. Walter 
Schwimmer Co. reports it has often 
cleared time for multi-market clients. 

Besides being on the scene, syndica- 
tors can help clear time by making 
deals with stations. They can offer 
a station a show it has wanted to run 
or make some kind of discount deal in 
selling a group of shows. 

The work of timebuyers is, of course 
vital as well. They are in a position, 
for example, to throw business from 
other clients the station's way. 

Probably the best way to clear time 
is to bring in a good show. 

Despite the excellent clearances snot 
tv films can sometimes get, the clear- 
ance problem is still the syndicator's 
biggest headache. He is anxiously 
awaiting some solution to the tv sta- 
tion allocations problem by the FCC 
for nothing can help him so much as 
a truly competitive tv service. The 
outlook for 1956 is not promising. 
There will probably be some new 
CP's in tight markets to relieve the 
pressure but the number is not ex- 
pected to be great. 

Merchandising: One of TPA's cri- 
teria in picking a show to sell is 
whether it is merchandisable. This will 
not surprise anybody since merchan- 
dising is one of the strongest selling 
points in the syndication business. 
(For details on this subject, see "How 
film sponsors promote their shows," 
sponsor, 12 December 1955.) 

As mentioned in another article in 
this issue (see story beginning page 
29), the syndicator is maturing in his 
approach to merchandising, is no 
longer satisfied with talking an adver- 
tiser into buying as much merchan- 
dising material as he can afford and 
letting it go at that. With a lot of 
experience packed under their belts, 
syndicators can advise the advertiser 
on why the Blank Co.'s merchandising 
didn't work and why the Doe Co.'s 
did. 

There are many angles to mer- 
chandising syndicated film. Walt Scan- 
Ion of CBS Film Sales lists eight basic 
ways in which this is done: (1) per- 
sonal appearances of stars, (2) point- 
of-sale displays, (3) direct mail, (4) 
station program promotion, (5) news- 
paper publicity and advertising, (6) 
magazine stories about program star 
and product advertising using the 
star, (7) radio advertising, (8) mo- 
tion picture theatre advertising. 



64 



In addition, franchised merchan- 
dise has become an important element 
in promoting tv shows, though the 
idea of such merchandise goes back 
to pre-radio days. TPA has a tie-up 
with Stone Associates, which special- 
izes in franchised merchandise and 
promotion. Low-cost franchised mer- 
chandise can be used by the sponsor 
as self-liquidators while the more ex- 
pensive products, sold by franchised 
manufacturers, serves as free adver- 
tising for the sponsor. 

Ziv has been stressing the value of 
promoting the show to employees of 
the sponsor. Employees are not only 
an obvious audience for such shows 
but pass along the word to others if 
the prompting is done properly. How- 
ever, this aspect of show promotion 
is frequently overlooked. 

Probably the most fruitful side of 
syndicated program promotion is that 
aimed at tots. One reason syndica- 
tors are so active in this area is that 
many of their shows run during the 
late afternoon and early evening peri- 
ods, which are, of course, particular- 
ly good for reaching young people. 
The young audience offers innumer- 
able opportunities via membership in 
clubs, comic books, self-liquidating 
premiums, attendance at personal ap- 
pearances, all of which can't help 
but sell the sponsor's product. And 
that, after all, is what this whole busi- 
ness is all about. 

Ratings and audience: The lar<*e 
choice of syndicated film available 
gives advertisers an excellent oppor- 
tunity to pinpoint his audience. Where 
a show is already on the air, he can 
check the rating services for audience 
composition. Where a show is not on 
the air, audience composition aver- 
ages of similar shows can be consult- 
ed. Advertisers would be wise not 
to trust their intuition on guessing 
what the audience composition of a 
show will be. They can sometimes be 
mighty surprised. 

However, it can generally be as- 
sumed that Westerns will have a high 
percentage of young viewers. More 
men than women usually view West- 
erns but not as many more as might be 
expected. As a matter of fact, for 
most show types, Westerns excepted, 
advertisers will find a healthy share 
of women audiences. One reason is 
that women are more consistent as 
viewers. Another reason is that audi- 
ence composition figures cover a lot 



Because*! 



bo much simpler to have your 
show on film! No serious upsets 
then when stars are ill or need 
rest. No cause for worry about i 
"slips" or "fluffs"! Besides, it's I 
the modern way to rehearse an< 
. . . then film and edit for final 
perfection. Know in advance- 
leave nothing to chance . . . 
USE EASTMAN FILM! 
For complete information write to 

Motion Picture Film Department 
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY 

Rochester 4, N. Y. 



or W. J. GERMAN, INC. 

Agents for the sale and distribution of 

Eastman Professional Motion Picture Films 

Fort Lee, N. J. ; Chicago, III.; Hollywood, Calif. 

East Coast Division 

342 Madison Avenue 
New York 17, N. Y. 

Midwest Division 

1 37 North Wabash Avenue 
Chicago 2, Illinois 

West Coast Division 

6706 Santa Monica Bivd 
Hollywood 38, Calif. 



AND BE SURE to film 

IN COLOR . . . 



You 71 be glad you dijs^ 




ktars are human, too... use film 




of daytime shows, which, of course, 
men can't view. 

So far as ratings are concerned, 
they can compare favorably with net- 
work shows of the same type. ABC 
Film Syndication recently compared 
local ratings of three pairs of shows, 
each pair consisting of a syndicated 
show and a network show. Three 
categories were covered, drama-mys- 
tery, situation comedy and western. 
Each pair was compared in a group 
of 10 markets. Rating source was 
ARB, March 1955. 

• A comparison of the syndicated 
Racket Squad vs. the network pro- 
gram, Public Defender, showed seven 
markets in which Racket Squad was 
higher and three markets in which 
Public Defender was higher. The 
former hit a 42.1 in Memphis. 

• Corliss Archer (syndicated) was 
ahead in five markets and / Married 
Joan (network) was higher in five 
markets. 

• Annie Oakley (syndicated) came 
out on top in five markets while Roy 
Rogers (network) was ahead in five. 

The comparison above is a very 
rough one since these programs were 
not necessarily programed at the same 



time or even on the same day. How- 
ever, while this is not a definitive 
study of network vs. spot, it shows 
that syndicated shows can pull audi- 
ences. 

While the quality of feature film 
varies widely, they can attract good 
audiences and capture a major share 
of the sets-in-use. This is just as true 
during the day as at night, which is 
the favorite time for feature films. 

Again, ABC Film Syndication sup- 
plies some facts on the subject. They 
are based on ARB ratings. 

• A Cleveland feature film show, 
Early Bird Theatre, shown Monday 
through Friday from 9:00 to 10:00 
a.m. captured 77.3% share of audi- 
ence last July and August. 

• A Kansas City program, Morn- 
ing Movie, shown Monday through 
Friday from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. cap- 
tured a 40% share of audience last 
July. 

• Another Cleveland feature film 
show, One O'Clock Playhouse, a strip 
shown from 1:00 to 2:30 p.m. copped 
an 81.5% share of audience last July 
and August. 

• An Atlanta Sunday show, Arm- 
chair Theatre, on from 12:30 to 2:30 



p.m., got a 71.9% share of audience 
last January and February and a 
71.6% last July and August. 

• In Houston, Movie Date, stripped 
at 11:45 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., captured 
a 61.1% share last July. 

Color: No syndicator believes color 
is just around the corner and few 
are shooting with color stock. Some 
syndicators are playing around with 
color for experimental purposes, but 
no more. One exception is Ziv, which 
feels that shows shot in color now 
represent a long-range investment. In 
other words, it is felt that shows al- 
ready shown in black-and-white will 
have fresh appeal in color. 

Last year Ziv's output came to 3.7 
million feet of film and 72% of this 
was shot in color. The firm distributes 
b-&-w prints to customers and stores 
the color prints for future use. 

CBS Film Sales has been shooting 
Long John Silver in color but, like 
Ziv, has been storing the color prints 
and distributing b-&-w prints only. 
CBS also has 13 Gene Autry episodes 
in color. 

Fred Mahlstedt, director of opera- 
( Please turn to page 70) 



FIRST 



...IN THIS 
2UTHERN MARKET 



The Ark-La-Tex is a vital, prosperous market 
where 311,235 families own over half as 
many TV sets. They have money to spend 
too . . . over $1,275,069,000! And, first in 
TV in this area is KSLA-TV with . . . 



• FULL 316,000 WATTS POWER 

• 1,195-FOOT TOWER 

• CBS BASIC NETWORK 

• PROVEN AUDIENCE LEADERSHIP 





PAUL H. RAYMER CO. INC. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 



66 



SPONSOR 



How to 




give your TV commercials 

a "COMPETITIVE EDGE" 



■ elevision audiences today are "conditioned" to many of the brilliant motion 
picture techniques now also used in TV productions — and they like it! Take 
away smooth switching — fades, lap dissolves, and transitions they are used to 
watching — and commercials look flat, dull, and jerky. Add these effects and the 
same presentations take on sparkle and dimension. In short, your commercials 
have a ''competitive edge"! 



Are your presentations 
out off date? 

Are your commercials limited to "direct 
switching 1 ' from scene to scene — or simple 
fades to black — because an elementary 
video switcher is used? If so, the sponsor 
is not getting the full benefit of all the pro- 
gramming ingenuity that could be at 
his disposal. 




How to make 

commercials "live" 

Modern video switching with special effects 
is your answer. With it, program directors 
can produce a variety of attention-getting 
effects in an instant; horizontal and vertical 
wipes, horizontal and vertical splits, con- 
trollable inserts, wedges, and other optical 
effects. You push the button for whatever 
you want — and insert the effect wherever 
you want it. Up goes audience interest. 
And up goes sponsor satisfaction. 

Which Switcher 

for you? 

RCA has a video-switching system to meet 
the specific requirement of each and 
every station. 

For example, RCA's TS-5A is ideal for 
small studio operations — provides fades, 
lap dissolves, super-positions — handles 5 
signal inputs. 

Type TS-11A is designed for maximum 
utilization of facilities — for any size opera- 
tion. It provides all facilities — includes a 




TS-5A VIDEO SWITCHER 



program transfer switch for previewing 
fades, lap dissolves, and special effects. 
Studio programs can be rehearsed while 
network or film is "on-air." 

Type TS-20 is a relay switching system for 
the larger installations. It is the ultimate in 
flexibility for modern programming. You 
can begin with as few as 6 inputs and 2 
outputs and build up to a maximum of 
12 inputs and 6 outputs. 



Special effects equipment 

Twelve attention-getting effects at your 
finger-tips . . . You push the button for the 
effect you want. You swing the "control 
stick" and put the selected effect wherever 
you want it. Simple, inexpensive — requires 
no complicated equipment or extra cameras. 
Any one of the above switchers coupled 
with this special effects equipment can give 
you the extra sales "edge" you want. 

For expert help in planning the right video 
switching and special effects system, call 
your RCA Broadcast Sales Representative. 



Ask 



the W 



ineer 



be 



kn o#s 




RADIO CORPORATION 
of AMERICA 

ENGINEERING PRODUCTS DIViSMON -CAMDEN, N.J. 

In Canada: RCA VICTOR Company Limited, Montreal 



LEADING TV STATIONS 
BUY "X": 



KOA 



ZIV's NEW BIG RATING-GETT 



KGNC-T 
KBOI-T> 
KCRI-T> 




MERICA'S 
LLI6ENCE EXPER1 



v/ 



Columbus, 
Dayton, Toledo, South Bend, 
Indianapolis, Bloomington, Grand 
Rapids, Champaign, Louisville, 
Evansville, Ft. Wayne, Kalamazoo, 
Lansing 

l-J^-^^B State of Wisconsin 

plus Duluth-SuDerior area! 



• SAFEWAY S 



ahomo City, Kans 
Rochester, Watertowr 

[Ml] J 

Birmingham 



• BROWN VELVET DAIRY 



* ADVENTURE 

* INTRIGUE 

* SUSPENSE 

Plan your '56 sales strategy to include 
TV's most colorful man of mystery. His 
dramatic impact on TV is certain to 
result in big audiences for your com- 
mercials . . . big demand for your prod- 
uct. Write, wire or phone for a presen- 
tation now. 



• PEVELY DAIRY 

• TEXAS COFI 

• GENESEE BE 

PACKI 



Louis 
Lake Charles 
Rochester 

Montgomer 

Los Angeles 

Pittsburah 

Dallas 

(CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH) 

Bakersfield 

Kansas City 



• MOHR CHEVRO 



HITE CH 



• BILLINGS MOTORS LTD. 



JEWEL 



Savannah 



• MARINE TRUST CO. OF 
WESTERN N. Y. 

PLY 



In H w I 3:*:ll^ ^1 I A 1 
San Francisco, Seattle 



■■% 




Norfolk 



■i 



LIVAN 



'iue 



Analyst, 

pecial Consult- 
<nt to the Joint 
-hiefs of Staff 



•fcThe man who 
penetrated the 
intelligence serv- 
icesofthe World's 
Great Pc 




NEW Y 

CINCINNATI 

CHICAGO 

HOLLYWQO0 



tions and production for CBS Film, 
sums up the attitude of most syndica- 
tors: "Real color production is at least 
two years off. maybe three or four. 
We'll probably begin to shoot in color 
next year but you must remember 
that the number of stations with film 
facilities is not large. It'll take time 
until a substantial number of stations 
Itave such facilities. As for storing 
color prints — well, who knows? May- 
be there'll be new color techniques 
when color tv finally arrives." 

A number of syndicators, especial- 



ly those who don't do their own pro- 
duction, take the point of view that 
it's not necessary for them to prepare 
for color, that, as distributors, they 
are always ready to handle it as soon 
as there's a market for it. 

It may or may not be significant 
but two deals for syndicated shows in 
color on a regular basis were made 
recently. RCA bought two markets 
for Judge Roy Bean, a western dis- 
tributed in color by Screencraft Pic- 
tures. The show will run on KING- 
IV, Seattle, and WNBQ, Chicago. 



it 




all 



+ 273* 

+ 132* 

+ 3* 



The latest ARB report (October, 1955) 

on the Rochester television audrence 
tells a mighty impressive story about 
what Rochesterians think of Channel 10! 




273 

132 

3 



Of the 461 competitive quarter hours 
weekly Channel 10 rates first in 273, 
and ties for first 11 times! 
Daytime, Mondays through Fridays, 
7 AM to 5 PM, Channel 10 rates first 
132 times- better than 2 to 1! 
Three of the four top-rated programs 
are heard on Channel 10! 



SECONDS 

177 

60 

1 



WRITE US TODAY FOR 
CHOICEST AVAILABILITIES 
IN ROCHESTER! 



CHANNEL 1Q 



VHF 



125,000 WATTS 



OPERATED SHARE TIME BY 
WHEC-TV AND WVET-TV 



CBS BASIC 



ABC AFFILIATE 



ROCHESTER, N.Y. 



which is being converted by NBC into 
the "world's first all-color tv station." 

The other buy involves a sale by Ziv 
of Cisco Kid to Foley's department 
store in Houston. The show will run 
on KPRC-TV. 

Despite the greater cost of color 
production there was no specific extra 
charge to the sponsors, although 
Screencraft reported that the fact the 
prints were in color had some effect 
on the price RCA paid. It is quite 
possible this price situation I not 
charging extra for color I may be 
common in the early days of syndi- 
cated film in color since a distributor 
may feel the prestige of a color sale 
may make it worthwhile to forego a 
differential. 

These two sales suggest that when 
color does come to the syndicated film 
business, it will affect the outdoor 
type show first. Whether there will 
be an early demand for color in drama 
or mystery shows is another question. 

• • • 



EVERETT-McKINNEY, INC. • NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES • THE BOILING CO.. INC. 



WHAT ADMEN WANT 

[Continued from page 51) 

standing that if he didn"t. the time 
would go to the home furnishings ad- 
vertiser. 

Other agencies mentioned a number 
of instances when syndicators called 
to tip them off on forthcoming expira- 
tion dates in markets clients might be 
interested in. Syndicators have occa- 
sionally been helpful in getting clients 
with budget problems potential co- 
sponsors or alternate-week sponsors. 
In those instances the burden of clear- 
ing the time generally still rested en- 
tirely with those clients" agencies. 

There should be a way to lock a 
film show into good time slots before 
selling the property, agencymen told 
sponsor. Admen feel syndicators can 
do this since they are close to the 
stations to whom they're trying to 
sell programing directly. An even 
closer tie and better lines of communi- 
cation between syndicators, station 
and agency could bring a flood of new 
clients into syndication, admen say. 

Pinpoint promotion: There's hardlv 
a syndicator today who doesn't pro- 
vide show promotion kits for the sta- 
tions a client buvs. But this general- 
ized, blanket coverage for all stations 



70 



SPONSOR 



THE SENATOR FROM 
SACRAMENTO SPEAKS 



the Senator is absolutely right! 

During its Total Weekly Telecasting Period, 
KCRA-TV has more "firsts" in the quarter- 
hour viewing periods than any other Sacra- 
mento station— 77% more "firsts" than the 
next Sacramento station! * 

2 During the Nighttime Viewing Period, from 
5:00 p.m. to signoff, Monday through Fri- 
day, KCRA-TV has more "firsts" in the 
quarter-hour viewing periods than any other 
Sacramento station— more "firsts" than the 
other two Sacramento stations combined ! * 

3 During the Daytime Viewing Period, from 
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through 
Friday, KCRA-TV has more "firsts" in the 
quarter-hour viewing periods than any other 
Sacramento station— 57% more "firsts" than 
the next Sacramento station ! * 

4 During the Weekend Viewing Hours (Satur- 
day and Sunday when KCRA-TV is on the 
air), KCRA-TV has more "firsts" in the 
quarter-hour viewing periods than any other 
Sacramento station— 21% more "firsts" than 
the next Sacramento station ! * 



*Source: American Research Bureau, Inc. 
A special Report on the 
Sacramento Television Audience 
November 7- 13, 1955 




LOOK AT THE RECORD, CALL PETRY AND BUY KCRA-TV! 



KCRA 



UuuuteE Q 



SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA • 100,000 Watts Maximum Power • BASIC [J|| 

Represented by Edward Pefry & Co. 




AFFILIATE 



23 JANUARY 1956 



71 



regardless of the market it's in doesn't 
do as effective a job as promotion 
keyed to specific local tastes and prob- 
lems, especially those of client. 

Medium-sized and smaller agencies 
would find it particularly helpful to 
work out local promotions for stations 
and local dealers in conjunction with 
the syndicator. But large agencies with 
sizable promotion departments of their 
own also need all the promotion help 
that can be given to build show rat- 
ings and aid clients. 

There are many efforts syndicators 
already include in show kits, and many 



are expanding their promotion. For 
example, national publicity for a show 
pays off in paving the way for local 
telecasts. Most syndicators provide 
point-of-purchase material to their 
clients for product tie-ins in retailer 
outlets. Some send out "tune-in" slides 
and mats for newspapers. Some syndi- 
cators provide recorded announce- 
ments of messages by show stars to be 
played in client offices over the p. a. 
system and at sales conventions. 

The promotion possibilities are in- 
finite, and there are few major syndi- 
cators today who aren't listening to 




lStf>* 



- S 






0^ 
WW** 1 




WSJS-TV 

316.000 WATTS 




AFFILIATE FOR 

WINSTON-SALEM 

GREENSBORO 

HIGH POINT 



I 



CALL 
HEADLEY-REED 

REPRESENTATIVES 



client pressure for more abundant and 
more creative promotion jobs. 

Logical pricing: Admen en masse 
feel there's a need for syndicators to 
justify and standardize their price 
structure. They're not referring to the 
pricing of one property compared with 
another, since there's generally infor- 
mation about the production budget to 
justify such differences. They're talk- 
ing about variations between markets 
and a need for clarifying the basis for 
rating one market above another of 
similar set saturation or population. 

A major stumbling block to buying 
film for a multi-market campaign is 
price. There's considerable feeling 
among buyers that the prices tend to 
be determined too much by "what the 
traffic will bear" rather than intrinsic 
values of the property such as the 
production budget, number of previ- 
ous runs and size of the markets con- 
sidered. Market potential, of course, is 
no set, inflexible yardstick at best. 
Some syndicators figure the market's 
value in terms of sets within the major 
station's coverage area, some figure it 
in terms of adjacent markets for which 
it may be a shopping center. 

Agencymen and clients would like to 
see more standardization and justifica- 
tion for pricing, so that they won't 
stumble upon the same property in a 
market of comparable set saturation 
selling at 20 c /c less than they paid for 
it. No one appreciates that. 

Research depth: There's a strong 
trend among syndicators to back up 
a sales pitch with audience research 
and track records for properties with 
previous runs. Admen would like to 
see film men key this research more 
specifically to the markets a client is 
considering and to his product. 

The syndicator can insure a long- 
term client and a satisfied one if he 
backs up the showing of his film prop- 
erty with figures on the audience com- 
position, for example, during its previ- 
ous runs in comparable markets, with 
studies on viewing habits and competi- 
tive programing within the local mar- 
kets the client is considering. Research 
of this type lends credence to claims 
of film syndicators. 

Admen feel that the very type of re- 
search syndicators need to sell their 
properties creatively to stations within 
each market can help advertisers make 
a sounder choice in programing. *** 



72 



SPONSOR 



DOMINANT 



In Programs 



.... In JPanrer 



In Audience 



250 Hours of Sponsored 

Network Shows in December 

. . . Plus Top Local & Film Features 

100,000 Watts on Channel 6 
Since May, 1954 . . . Penetration 
of Area Already Accomplished 

65% Total Weekly Share in 
26-County Area Telepulse (Sept. '55) 
First in Every Program Period. 



The Powerhouse of the Southwest 



CBS-ABC 




INTERCONNECTED 



KCMC-TV 



TEXARKAI\A 
TEXAS - ARKANSAS 



Represented bj 

Venard, Rintoul and McConnell, Inc. 

Walter M. Windsor, (General Manager) 

CHANNEL 6 



23 JANUARY 1956 



73 






Fastest- moving film in television! 





They don't sit around long on the 
shipping-room shelves at CBS Television 
Film Sales. For here are the stand-out 
shows in the syndicated film field . . . 
the audience-proven programs of the 
sparkling variety and dramatic impact 
that gave CBS Television Film Sales 
the biggest year of its life in 1955. 

Whatever your program choice may be — 
adventure, comedy, drama, Westerns 
or news — here you'll find the big-name, 
top-quality productions . . . every one 
a time-tested audience-winner. 

And there's more to come, because 
expansion is the word for '56. Nearly a 
dozen major new properties are being 
readied. Merchandising and promotion 
departments are being enlarged. Sales 
service and distribution facilities are 
better than ever. There's expansion and 
excitement everywhere you turn, from 
story conference to shipping room ! 

And there's a show for your needs at 
fast-moving CBS Television Film Sales. 
Take a look at the list below, then call 
our nearest office — New York, Chicago, 
Los Angeles, Detroit, Boston, St. Louis, 
San Francisco, Dallas, Atlanta. In Canada: 
S. W. Caldwell, Ltd., Toronto. 

CBS Television 
Film Sales, Inc. 

Distributors of Amos 'n' Andy, The Gene Autry Show, 
Buffalo Bill, Jr., Cases of Eddie Drake, Fabian of Scotland 
Yard, Holiday in Paris, Files of Jeffrey Jones, Life with 
Father, Adventures of Long John Silver, Annie Oakley, 
The Range Rider, San Francisco Beat, The Whistler, 
Red Ryder and Newsfilm — a product of CBS News. 



FILM CASE HISTORIES 

( Continued from page 52 I 

Led Three Lives had a proved adult 
audience in markets where it had 
previously run. Furthermore, the agen- 
cy considered it a prestige vehicle deal- 
ing with contemporary problems of 
subversion which, at the time of the 
initial buy, were particularly in the 
headlines. 

"There was an extra immediacy 
about this program that other possi- 
bly equallv good dramas didn't seem 
to have." John Bates explained. 



It was a show with strong promo- 
tion potentials both to the viewing pub- 
lic and to the trade. The kind of bulk 
buy (27 markets initially) that Phillips 
contracted for made a sizeable promo- 
tion investment plausible. 

Since buying the program, the agen- 
cy and client have been evaluating re- 
sults from a number of indications: 
(. 1 ) ratings, while satisfactory to the 
client from the start, have been im- 
proving as loyal audiences have been 
built in each market and as time sched- 
ules have been improved; (2) the 19 
Phillips division managers who con- 



WICHITA WINDY SCORES 

AGAIN! 




NOVEMBER ARB SHOWS 
KTVH STILL NO. 1 IN THE 
BIG WICHITA AREA 

Again, for the sixth straight survey, KTVH 
Letterman, Wichita Windy, plops 'em in the 
basket, and Channel 12 scores again as the 
dominant TV station in the Wichita area. 
November, 1955, ARB Scoreboard gives KTVH 
eight out of the ten top-rated shows. The 
KTVH Team guards your profits, plays "all 
over the court," carrying the ball for you into 
Wichita and 14 other Kansas communities. 
To Sell In Kansas, Buy KTVH 



VHF 
240,000 
WATTS 



KTVH 

HUTCHINSON 

Kansas 



CBS BASIC 

Represented Nationally by H-R Representatives, Inc. 



CHANNEL 

12 



KTVH, pioneer station in rich Central Kansas, serves more than 14 important communities 
besides Wichita. Main office and studios in Hutchinson; office and studio in Wichita 
(Hotel Lassen). Howard O. Peterson, General Manager. 



tact jobbers and dealers in the show's 
coverage area have gotten good re- 
actions. 

Lambert and Feasley feels that two 
factors have been important in making 
their client's use of syndicated film 
successful: (1) choice of program; 
(2) time clearances. The timebuying 
was handled by Bill Hinman, who 
continued working towards improving 
the schedules throughout the run of 
the show. Today, the program is in 
prime evening time in every single 
market. 

"While we did all the buying, of 
course, we did get tips from Ziv about 
expirations in a market that helped us 
improve our schedule," Hinman told 
SPONSOR. 

He adds that his job was made 
easier by the fact that he was consulted 
about possible clearances be'ore the 
show was actually bought. Also, Phil- 
lips had previously bought football 
games on many of the stations it is still 
using, and certain times were therefore 
automatically open to him. 

"But we're still improving the line- 
up," he says. "In Harlingen, Tex., for 
example, we had put the show on 
KGBT Sundays at 2:00 p.m. Now 
we're on Sundays at 8:30 p.m. follow- 
ing Toast of the Town, and GE 
Theater." 

A few months ago, the client and 
agency decided that they would have 
to make up for the extra cost of mar- 
ket expansion in some way beyond the 
increases in advertising budget which 
Phillips had allocated each year. 

"We decided that we could still get 
weekly exposure if we could make 
good arrangements for alternate-week 
sponsorship on a two-to-ons ratio for 
the commercials," Mace explained. 
"With such a major-minor advertiser 
arrangement, we would get two com- 
mercials one week, one commercial the 
next." 

Here's how Phillips went about look- 
ing for potential alternate-week spon- 
sors: 

1. The agency informed Ziv that 
they wanted this type of arrangement. 

2. Bill Hinman sent out inquiries 
to all the Phillips tv stations, since 
they might know of local or regional 
clients who wouldn't be in touch with 
the syndicator or with a New York 
agency. 

3. Through the radio-tv depart- 
ment, Lambert and Feasley contacted 
radio-tv directors at other agencies 






76 



SPONSOR 




23 JANUARY 1956 



77 



and explained the problem. 

"Our big advantage was that we had 
already secured excellent time clear- 
ances and that we had a proven prop- 
erty," Mace added. 

Today Phillips shares sponsorship 
with some Nabisco products (through 
McCann-Erickson) on eight stations, 
with Thom McCann shoes (through 
Ogilvy, Benson & Mather) in Miami. 

Gunther Brewing: Bryan Houston 
agency began considering syndicated 
films for Gunther Brewing as soon as 



the agency took over the account more 
than a year ago. However, the phi- 
losophy underlying their choice of pro- 
graming was distinctly different from 
Phillips'. 

"We feel that the biggest plus in 
syndicated film is its flexibility," says 
John Marsicano, Gunther account ex- 
ecutive. "By flexibility we don't mean 
in terms of choosing markets and sta- 
tions and time only. We also mean 
suiting the show to the taste of the in- 
dividual market." 

He illustrated this strategy by corn- 




Hill Tower, situated on 
Dallas County's highest 
natural elevation, is 1,521 
feet from base to tip . . . 
1,685 feet above average 
terrain. It is the second 
tallest man-made struc- 
ture in the world. KRLD- 
TV began telecasting 
from its new facilities on 
December 23, 1955. 



Now beams its maximum 
power signal from the 
top of Texas tallest tower** 

TO THE GREAT SOUTHWEST 

Top O' Texas 
Market ! 



42 flourishing Texas and Oklahoma 
counties including CITY GRADE 
COVERAGE TO THE METRO- 
POLITAN AREAS OF BOTH 
DALLAS AND FORT WORTH, 
the greatest concentration of people 
and wealth in the South or South- 
west. 



P7 rn n m s~? \vi The Tim " Heroid s,a,ion 

\ 4\ Q Hi Owners and Operators of KRLD Radio, 50,000 

LjtA J J ' ' —-) -J '_/ The Branhom Company, Exclusive Representativ 



"he BIGGEST buy in the BIGGEST market in the BIGGEST State 



Qmnd 4,VoJHm 

MAXIMUM POWER 



JOHN W. RUNYON CLYDE W. REMBERT 

Chairman of the Board President 




paring two markets in which Gunther 
sponsors two different shows: MCA- 
TV's Waterfront in Baltimore and 
RCA Recorded Programs' Town and 
Country in Lynchburg, Va. 

Since Baltimore is a seaport, the 
agency and client both felt that this 
market would be receptive to stories 
of waterfront problems. Lynchburg, a 
smaller inland market with an entirely 
different temperament, seemed likely 
to seek another form of entertainment. 
Town and Country is a musical variety 
show with a similar format and ap- 
proach to the Tennessee Ernie shows, 
appealing to that type of market. 

Currently, Gunther sponsors MCA- 
TV's Waterfront in Baltimore, Wash- 
ington, D. C, Lancaster, Pa., and 
Richmond; RCA Recording's Town 
and Country in Lynchburg and Rich- 
mond; NBC Films Badge 714 in 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

"When you're planning to go into 
a few selected markets only, show 
availability presents big problems," 
Marsicano explained. 

First-runs of top properties are of- 
fered to the large-budget advertiser 
with a sizeable market list first. Yet 
the client with two markets obviously 
also wants a film starring top names. 

"We prefer first runs and in the 
case of Waterfront, for example, we 
got them," says Marsicano. "But we 
don't object to reruns on principal, as 
long as there's a decent interval be- 
tween the original showing and the 
rerun. The fact that a film was used 
to sell aspirins in a second run, doesn't 
mean it can't sell beer in a third or 
fourth. The main point is that we 
don't want to use a property that has 
already saturated the audience." 

Broadly, the agency had looked for 
predominantly male-appeal properties 
for its clients, since Gunther feels that 
men are the ones who buy beer in its 
distribution area. There is little at- 
tempt to woo women in Gunther 's air 
media advertising. Town and Coun- 
try, of course, tends to get a more 
mixed adult audience than Waterfront. 

"We also wanted a prestige star like 
Preston Foster, who plays the lead in 
Waterfront," says Marsicano. "We 
were fortunate in that his annual tour 
from MCA coincided with our going 
on the air in some of our markets. 
This gave our show promotion a ter- 
rific kick-off." 

While the agency felt that Preston 



78 



SPONSOR 



\ / 



NO MATTER HOW 
YOU IQOk M IT , 

IN PHOENIX... 




KOOL-TV |S THE 

564,000 ANSWER! 



KOOL 



T E L E V 

PHOENIX, 



I S I O N 

ARIZONA 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 
George P. Hollingbery 




© 



64.7% of the quarter-hour firsts belong to KOOL-TV 
according to the most recent Pulse. KOOL-TV walked-off 

with 12 of the top 1 5 programs . . . leaving the other 
three Phoenix stations with only one each. If you plan 

to attack the rich Phoenix market. KOOL-TV is your 
answer. See your Hollingbery representative. 



Percentage of 

Quarter-Hour 

FIRSTS 




KOOL-TV 

STATION B 
STATION C 
STATION D 



TELEPULSE 
Nov. 9- 15, 1955 



SIGN ON 
to NOON 



100.0 



NOON to 
6:00 p.m. 



43.1 

17.8 
27.6 
11.4 



6:00 p.m. 
to Midnight 



65.3 

24.4 
4.6 
4.6 



"TOP 1 5" 
once a week 



12 



23 JANUARY 1956 



79 





independent Life pays approximately $2 million annually to 
its 400 Jaxon employees, has $10 million in mortgage loans 
in its home county, spends $175,000 annually for printin" 
and stationery alone in WMBR-TVs home town 



9 Home Offices and 33 Regional 
Branches Make Jacksonville the 
Insurance Center of the Southeast 

FLORIDA'S tourist-attracting sunshine also warms the gov- 
ernmental atmosphere, adding a friendly climate for business 
and industry. The tax barometer reads "No state income tax " 
!, : a , multl - nillli °n dollar industry with annual home office 
payroll of $13 million for hustling Jacksonville. 

Providing home office employment for more than 3,500 persons 
the insurance business is a stabilizing factor in the Jacksonville 
economy. Home of more than 600 industries, major seaport site 
?^ im £n rtant , Navy installati ons, Jacksonville is a market of 
• ;?£?r£ a £ etp,ace for 700 ' 000 more. You reach most of them 
via WMBR-TV, the oldest, most powerful, most-watched tele- 
vision station in the area. 






h n nr^Vn nnn U n r nn C rF 0mpany °P erates exclusively in Florida, 
nas 300,000,000 life insurance m force, 150 000 policv 
holders, and employs 240 Florida men and women 



The Afro-An,eri«an Life Insurance Company's million-dollar installa- 

^fwSwJJSrt* (S ? . initial assets) start in i9ol Current 

assets. 3.7,874,000. Annual Jaxon payrol: $337,144 Insurance in 
force: $43.000000. Jacksonville's Negro population en oys P rac 
tically full employment. 










'•* 'M*. 



-"*" -- rr % 





Total area covered by WMBR-TV's 
maximum powered signal includes 
a million people — a billion dollar 
market reached exclusively by 
Northern Florida's and Southern 
Georgia's most powerful station. 



WMBR-TV 



Channel 4 • Basic CBS 

Representee/ by CBS Television Spot Sales 



state Farm's Southeastern office employs 363, writes fire and auto 
insurance for Florida, Georgia, North and South Carolina. Pay- 
roll exceeds $1,250,000 annually. 




Electronic computers like this one figure policy dividends, deduct 
them from premiums, establish balances - at the rate of 6,000 
per hour, which is only a bit faster than folks are moving to 
Florida (2,600 people per week). 



Peninsular Life, Florida's oldest chartered life insurance company, 
was founded in 1901 in Jacksonville, now employs 600, one-third 
of whom live here. Construction of new home office on semi- 
suburban site set new standard for commercial building, boosted 
Jacksonville as insurance center. 




CLOWN QUEEN OF TV 



"I MARRIED 

JOAN" 



* 



co-starring 
JIM 
(Mr. Magoo) §4 
BACKUS ^> 

You can tell a girl 
by the company she keeps . . . 

and for the past two years Joan 
kept one of the nation's biggest 
companies dizzy with sales. 
We've just pried her off the 
network to make I MARRIED JOAN 
available to regional and 
local advertisers. No other 

syndicated film series goes to 
work for you so unquestionably 

pre-sold. When you attach your 
product message to Joan Davis in 
I MARRIED JOAN, you hold 
the attention of all age groups, 
all economic levels, all the time. 

98 HALF HOURS 

The happiest, high-rated 
network show. ..now tv's 
smash hit syndicated series. 




Foster would "give authority to our 
commercials," it didn't pay to make 
film commercials for the four markets 
in which the show is running. Gunther 
uses its own local announcers in each 
instance. 

However, the client does try to capi- 
talize on the films by using the star 
in as many point-of-sale posters and 
local promotions as they can. 

Time clearances were a problem the 
agency solved on its own, although it 
frequently worked on tips both from 
the local brewery salesmen and from 
the syndicator. 

"Today syndicators help clients a 
lot more with time clearances than a 
couple of years ago," adds Marsicano. 
"But if you aren't on the air for 52- 
week runs, it's still tough getting the 
best availabilities both in shows and 
in time." 

National Biscuit: Nabisco (through 
McCann-Erickson) uses syndicated 
films to advertise various individual 
products in a number of regions and 
individual markets throughout the 
country in addition to its other net- 
work and spot campaigns. 

"The number of network cut-ins nec- 
essary to plug different products in 
each market would drive up the cost 
out of proportion so we need supple- 
mentary campaigns. With syndicated 
film, each product can get top show 
identification of its own." 

Nabisco has been using syndicated 
film since April 1955 with measurable 
effects on the sale of its products in 
the 14 markets where they're on the 
air. 

"We try to buy the show and the 
time simultaneously if possible," the 
agencyman explained. "Of course, 
there's a batch of headaches when you 
buy market-by-market, but if you don't 
tie yourself down to one starting date 
for several markets, you can afford to 
be a little choosier. There's one thing 
we feel strongly: We don't buy a show 
unless we're sure of the time." 

As a result of this approach, Nabis- 
co products sponsor such different 
shows as Corliss Archer, Badge 714, 
Nabisco Playhouse and, of course, / 
Led Three Lives. The last buy, on an 
alternate-week basis, appealed to the 
client partly because of the show value 
and partly because the established 
sponsor, Phillips, already provided the 
time periods. 

"We like that sort of co-sponsor- 







TELEVISION CORPORATION 
NEW YORK CHICAGO HOLLYWOOD 

445 Park Ave. 1250 S.Wabash 4376 Sunset Drive 
MUrray Hill 8-2545 WAbash 2-7937 NOrmandy 2-9181 



Here's 
Your Man! 

FOR SELLING THE SMALL- 
FRY AUDIENCE IN DENVER 

Sheriff Scotty . . . some of 
his advertisers have been 
with him since KLZ-TV 
went on the air . . . because 
his is Denver's top-rated 
multi weekly program- 
consistently . . . And be- 
cause he's the salesdarndest 
merchandiser with success 
stories to prove it. 

Ask your Katz man for the first 
available time. 

CBS Television in Denver 




Denver's Highest Powered Television Slotion 



SPONSOR 



THE UPPER OHIO VALLEY- 



THE NATION'S 
FASTEST GROWING 



East Liverpool 



INDUSTRIAL AREA! 



Bridgeport 




Powhatan Point 



Sistersville 



In this 70-mile stretch along the Upper Ohio River 
Valley (the prime coverage area of WTRF-TV, 
Wheeling) industry is experiencing an amazing 
growth! 

The Ohio Valley Industrial Corporation estimates 
conservatively that during the past three years in- 
dustries have invested $325,000,000 in new plants 
and expansion. Their conservative estimate of al- 
ready authorized and proposed expenditures for this 
same area for the next three years is $450,000,000 
. . . that's a minimum total of $775,000,000; and 
there are responsible people who believe that this 
figure may reach ONE BILLION DOLLARS before 
the end of this six-year period! 

With the march of Industry come skilled workers 
who reap rich rewards in the form of good pay and 
comfortable living. Current figures show 416,210 
families, owning 307,400 television sets; 1,409,300 
people, with a combined spendable income of 
$1,973,985,000— an average of $4,742. 



Only WTRF-TV, Wheeling, offers SO MUCH! 

*WTRF-TV dominates the Upper Ohio 
Valley . . . Current Telepulse Ratings 
show that: 

13 of the top 15 weekly shows are on 

"WTRF-TV! 

10 of the top 10 multi-weekly shows 

"are on WTRF^TW 

"FOUR important FIRST PRIZES in nationwide 

promotion competition! 

*NBC programming plus excellent local shows! 

: Full-Power 316,000 watts! 

'Network color! 



The best way to reach this rich industrial market is 
to use the dominant medium, WTRF-TV, Wheeling. 
The eyes of the valley are focused on WTRF-TV . . . 
the strongest advertising medium! 

WTRF-TV 



Wheeling 7, West Virginia 



NiC 



For availabilities, call Hollingbery, Bob 
Ferguson, VP and General Manager, or. 
Needham Smith, Sales Manager, Wheeling 
• 1177. 




23 JANUARY 1956 



83 




Quick 
Watson! 

The sure syndication winner, "THE AD- 
VENTURES OF SHERLOCK HOLMES," is 
currently appearing five times weekly, 
Monday through Friday at 11:30 P.M. 
on WMAR - TV. For the sponsor with 
good horse sense who wants immediate 
and continued results from a high-step- 
ping mystery series, this is by all odds 
the best bet. Put this odds-on favorite 
containing all of the story magic of the 
original A. Conan Doyle classic series 
to work for you,- contact your nearest 
Katz agency. You'll be cashing in on the 
biggest thing since Nashua. 



EVERY NIGHT 

(MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY) 

11:30-12:00 P.M. 

Participations available 




SUNPAPERS TELEVISION, BALTIMORE, MD. 

TELEVISION AFFILIATE OF THE 

COLUMBIA BROADCASTING SYSTEM 

Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY, Inc. 

New York. Detroit, Kansas City, San Francisco, 

Chicago, Atlanta, Dallas, Los Angeles 



ship," said the client. "That way, we 
get weekly exposure on a show with 
a proved track record and in good time 
slots." 

Because of the sales increases in 
Nabisco's film markets during the past 
year, the firm is planning to keep in- 
creasing the number of markets and 
products which will be using syndi- 
cated properties. 

?. ; <'l(iii(iiin Braveries: Rheingold 
Beer (through Foote, Cone & Belding) 
is in its fourth complete show cycle of 
Doughs Fairbanks Presents in some 
markets. Currently, Rheingold has the 
following lineup for Fairbanks: 
WRCA-TV, New York, Mondays 
10:30-11:00 p.m.; WNBF-TV, Bing- 
hamton, New York, Thursdays 11:15- 
11:45 p.m.; WNHC-TV, New Haven, 
Conn., Saturdays 11:00-11:30 p.m.; 
KRCA, Los Angeles, Mondays 10:30- 
11:00 p.m.; WKMB-TV, San Diego, 
Mondays 10:00-10:30 p.m. 

Rheingold picked the film because it 
measured up to its criteria of good 
entertainment and production, and 
also because it felt that its star 
(Fairbanks actually appears only in 
about one out of four of the stories), 
had "pergonal prestige and reputation 
equal to the product." Before buy- 
ing the show, the agency approached 
Fairbanks about commercials, ar- 
ranged to star him in them. 

Rheingold has sponsored the series 
all along: the first 39 films (through 
NBC Film Division) ; 78 films through 
Interstate Tv which were taken over 
by ABC Film Division in spring 1955; 
and the new series of 39 which ABC 
Film Division handles. The contract 
for commercials between Rheingold 
and Fairbanks has not been affected 
by these changes, since it was nego- 
tiated between Fairbanks, the agency 
and the brewery. 

"We're constantly working at im- 
proving our ratings by improving the 
schedules," Peter Bardach, FCB time- 
buver for Rheingold, told SPONSOR. 
"Within the past week we've changed 
from Wednesday to Monday night at 
the same hour on WRCA-TV, because 
we felt that Mondays have a stronger 
network lineup for us to follow." 

The aim in timebuying is to reach 
a maximum adult audience. "Late eve- 
ning suits us ideally, because we pre- 
fer a predominantly adult audience," 
Bardach adds. * * * 




"My Little Margie" 

Mondays thru Fridays 
4:00-4:30 P.M. 



Three I -minute spots 
available within the 
show at regular rates 



"Million Dollar Movie" 

Sundays 1:30-3:00 P.M. 

— also — 
Sundays 11:00-12:30 Nite 

Minutes available 
at n d premium . . . 
film and slide com- 
mercials only. 



Write, wire or phone 
WEED or the Station 
for rates and avail- 
abilities. 



i 



Channel 4 



WFBC-TY 

Greenville, S. C. 




NBC NETWORK 

Represented Nationally By 

WEED TELEVISION CORP. 



84 



SPONSOR 




Looking for coverage? ... 

look to wfmy-tv! 

Make increased sales in the Prosperous Piedmont your New Years' 
resolution for 1956. And the best way to keep this resolution is with 
WFMY-TV . . . basic CBS for the entire Prosperous Piedmont section of 
North Carolina and southwest Virginia. 

Telecasting with full 100,000 watts of power to more than 2 million 
people in this 46 county industrial gold-mine, WFMY-TV gives you cover- 
age no other station dares claim. WFMY-TV is the only station that can 
spread your sales message over this entire $2.3 billion market. 

To ring out the old, to bring in newer, even greater profits, call your 
H-R-P man today for the full story of WFMY-TV's coverage of the 
Prosperous Piedmont. 



ujfmij-tv 




GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Represented by 

Harrington, Righter & Parsons, Inc. 

N»w York — Chicago — San Francisco 




Now In Our 
Seventh Year 



23 JANUARY 1956 



85 



WHO WAS THAT LADY 



- "-'^ 



I SEEN 
YOU WITH 



LAST NIGHT? 




from Gulf To Ocean • Gainesville To Okeechobee 



Everybody's talking — so you may as well 

know, that lady was a lady. And not only a 

creature of rare beauly, but brains as well. Besides, 

she happens to buy time for an advertiser with a real hunk of budget 

It was predestined that we meet. She hears about the 
selling job we're doing in our greal market with that tourist 
bonus of $650 million. It's love at first sight. 

It looks like we'll be going steady for a long, long 
while — but do 'phone anyhow. 




Now Something New is Added— "RECALLIT and WIN"— 



Cash Prizes — Every Weekday — On The Hour — $7000 jackpots! 

P.S. Here's a "natural" for national and regional advertisers who want to 
get the most out of their spot radio dollars. It's a 27-County W«GTO-Land 
Quiz, modeled after the high rated KWK (St. Louis) show that has been 
paying off for lisleners — and sponsors — for years. 

SEND FOR FULL DETAILS TODAY 



W°OT(0> 



Eugene D. Hill, Gen. Mgr. 
HAINES CITY, FLA. 
PHONE 6-2621 

owned and operated 

by KWK, St. Louis, Missouri 

Represented by 

WEED & COMPANY 






10,000 WATTS 540 KILOCYCLES 




!§ee: Union uses network radio newscast 

as p.r. aid 

Issue: 22 August 1955, page 76 

SnlJJCOtt Newscaster helps sell union to public 



With the merger of the AFL and CIO. there was a problem as to 
whether either one or both of the network radio news programs 
the two unions had sponsored would be dropped. The AFL had 
sponsored Edward P. Morgan News (Mon.-Fri., 10-10:15 p.m.) and 
the CIO had used John W. Vandercook (Mon.-Fri., 7-7:15 p.m.), 
both over ABC. 

The problem was resolved when the merged union signed a 52- 
week contract for both shows, only reversing their times so that 
Morgan is in the early slot and Vandercook in the later period. 
The general function of the shows will be unchanged, reported the 
union's agency, Furman Feiner & Co., of New York. 

In the words of AFL-CIO President George Meany, "We are glad 
to continue both of these news programs which have built up large 
listening audiences throughout the country. Both Mr. Morgan and 
Mr. Vandercook have distinguished themselves as liberal commen- 
tators. The views they express are entirely their own. The AFL- 
CIO will not try to control their opinions." 




See: 



The two Toigos 



Issue: 7 March 1955, page 31; 21 March 

« ^~~—- 1955, page 34 

»HDJ©CIt Two cousins are executives in rival 
agencies 



What is the latest in the Toigo sweepstakes? With two cousins 
holding executive positions in rival ad agencies, sooner or later 
their agencies would have to be directly competitive on an account 
or campaign. This happened recently when Schlitz Brewing Co. 
moved from Lennen & Newell to Biow-Beirn-Toigo. 

Adolph Toigo is president of Lennen & Newell, while John Toigo 
is executive vice president of Biow-Beirn-Toigo. The former agency 
has the Old Gold account as well as Colgate-Palmolive's Pruf and 
Lustre-Creme. Competitive accounts at Biow are Philip Morris and 
Procter & Gamble's Fluffo, Spic & Span and Shasta. 

When Schlitz joined B-B-T, the agency also had the Buppert ac- 
count, which immediately left. Schlitz billings are about $9 million, 
while Ruppert spent considerably less, below $3 million. The 
Schlitz addition made the scene somewhat rosier for the Biow 
agency. The recent loss of the $8 million Pepsi-Cola account 
brought John Toigo into a controversy when he announced that 
he had a personal contract with the soda company that guaranteed 
him two years more with the account. The dispute seemed to have 
been settled after the new agency, Kenyon & Eckhardt, was chosen. 

No indication has been given that Schlitz ad strategy will be 
changed. The big brewer is the only one in the field to peg its 
main air effort on a network tv dramatic show. Usual procedure 
for the beer makers has been emphasis on sports, but Schlitz suc- 
cessfully bucks the tide with Schlitz Playhouse of Stars (Friday, 
CBS TV, 9-9:30 p.m.), though some sports coverage is obtained. 

John may have another headache developing. Whitehall Pharma- 
cal Co. moved Anacin, Preparation H and most of the other products 
in its $8 million account to Ted Bates, effective 1 April. This will 
leave B-B-T about $5 million in the hole, compared to the day before 
Pepsi bubbled off. * * * 




Stars of 

Dinner Theatre 

6:00 to 6:30 Monday-Friday 

Stars Sell on 
Alabama's 

greatest TV station 




Birmingham 



Every night a different star, on his own 
program. They average over twice as 
many viewers as Birmingham's second 
station. 

WABT No. 2 

Mon. Jungle Jim 30.0 10.3 

Tues. Rin Tin Tin 27.8 16.0 

Wed. Superman 29.8 12.8 

Thurs. Lone Ranger 27.3 15.8 

Fri. Wild Bill Hickok 28.8 14.5 
(December Telepulse of Birmingham) 

You can SELL 

Your Products 
to Alabama folks 
If you TELL 

them on programs 
they enjoy seeing 

Represented by 

BLAIR-TV 



23 JANUARY 1956 



87 



ininjj Co. • Loft Cand/ Corp. • Quaker Oats Co. • Gen. Retail Corp . • Mogen David Wine Corp. • Calif. Prune Adv. Board • Calo Dog Food Co. '• Hershel Calif. Fruit Prods. • SI 
Is. • Dad's Root Beer « Doehla Greeting Cards • Harnm Brewing Co. • Hunt Foods, Inc. • Jacuzzi Bros., Inc. • Kathryn Kuhlman • Latter & Sons • Lenos, Inc. • Loma Lin 
or, Inc. • Standard Oil of Calif. • Star Import Co. • World Church • Amer. Cyanamid Co. • John W. Black • Drug Research Corp. • Eastern Airlines, Inc. • Grolier Society • 
: ood Co. • Webster's Unified, Inc. ♦ Amer. Scientific, Inc. * Books Abridged, Inc. • Famous Artists Schools • I.B.M. • Rootes Motors. Inc. • Keystone Paint & Varnish • Am 
'bide & Carbon Chem. Co. ♦ Chap Stick Co. • Empire State Pickling Co. • Musterole Co. • Package Machinery Co. • Stewart-Warner Corp. . Watt Pub. Co. • Amer. Grease St 
irowers, Inc. • Amer. Tobacco Co. • Colgate Palmolive Peet Co. • Ex-Lax,. Inc. • Doan's Pills • Harian Pub. Co. • Hudnut Sales Co. - Internat. Nickel Co. • Internat. Salt Co 
Corrugated Roofing* F. Ad Richter • Waverly Fabrics • Pertussin • Slenderella Systems, Inc. • Stern's Nurseries • Glasskleer • Wildroot Co. • Crowell Collier Pub. Co. . 
hem. Co. • Link Aviation, Inc. • RCA Victor • Sun Oil Co. • Underwood Corp. • Carter's Little Liver Pills • Rex Fruit Syrups • G. Washington Coffee • Acrilan • E. States I 
I & Son • Lever Bros. • Scott- Mitch e Oouse » Kendell Mills « D uff Ba king Mix Co rp. »_St u debak er Corp. • Arfr r. Mea t Institute • Dr. He ss & C l ark. Inc. • Facts Forum, I 
Carhartt • Criban Wine Co. • rt^ ^s^i SP*^^ fc"^^u[BWfc'^^Cj^fflltatf!!IBW^««p. ^wpWigric. Ass*^' PBITfenMPou 

BrarmBic. ^A^^MaiHta^. * An f rLJili 
jitorproB PiML. m>rug fjj^e^p Corp. •^epsBol 
anneffTraomWRaleSTor* • NeSlWssociat 
Top Value Enterprises • Wilbert's Wax Co. • Wilkining Co. • Amer. Toy Promotion • Christmas Club Corp. 
Green Giant • Dickinson. Popcorn • Wishbone Co. • Calo Dog Food Co. • Sawyers, Inc. • Instant Milk Co 



rprises • Woodman of World Life 
ulp & Paper Co. • G. Krueger Bre 
acuum Oil Co. • Arnold Bakers, 
• Charles Gulden, Inc. • Ideal Toys 
3o. • Mitchell Mfg. Co. • D-Con Co. 





effer Sewing CJ 
BttfW&rry Ctffl 
Federal Nut • Amer. Dai] 
"42" Products Ltd. . wj 
ey Mfg. Co. ♦ Helene Curtis, Inc. • Morrel-Felin • Standard Knitting Mill • Southern Biscuit Co. • Van Camp Sea Food Co. • Instant Grip Cement • Petrie of Calif. • Lance fj 
nes • May po, Inc. • S. A. Schenbrumm & Co. '• Shillcraft Rug Co. • Shwayder Bros., Inc. • Seabrook Farms • Stegmaier Brewing Co. • Amer. Molasses Co. • Burry Biscuit i 
;ar Company • Manchester Hosiery Mills • Mary Chess, Inc. • Albert Ehler • . Pharmacraft • Hagen, Inc. • Hudson, Paper Company • Ludens, Inc. • OlinMathiesonChem.il 
Ritchie •' Kiwi Shoe Polish • All • Neechi Distrs. • Purex Liquid Bleach • Self Skin • Hubinger Starch Co. • Libby Food Co. • C. H. Masland • Morton's • Warfield Theat r 
aint Co. • Bardahal Mfg. Co. • Internat. Shoe Co. • Cracker Jack Co. • Rug Sheen • Hollywood Brands • Household Finance • Radex • Zonite Prod. • Ocoma Foods • MJ 
ermador • Birds Eye • Bolens Prods. • Rose's Lime Juice • Vic Tanny ♦ Loma Linda Foods • Norbest Canning Co. • Doughboy Plastic Pools • Bisceglia Bros. • WestlakeF| 
rite • Union Pharmaceutical • Allen Rug Cleaning Co. • James Austin Co. • Dr. Baum • Braun Baking Co. • Budget Laundry • Central Drug Co. • Dair>""~~'- "- ~> <mes As I 
osiery Shops • Fulton Theatre • Gluck, Martin Distributing Co. • Golomb Paint & Glass Co. • Jiffy Steak Co. • Koolvent Metal Awning Co. • Me- 
: urniture Co. ♦ Peoples First Nat. Bank & Trust • Pgh. Brewing Co. • C. J. Rober Co. • Roberts Jewelry Co. • C. R. Rogers Corp. • Roth Re 
tate Oil Co. • Union Dairy Farmers Co-op • Breyer Ice Cream Co. • Goldman Theatres • Phila. Gas Works • Pi o, inc. • Randolph Theat>- 
s Prods. • Lassiter Corp. • Mrs. Schlorer's Inc. • Fairless Hills Homes ♦ King Steaks • Joy Foot Pads • Phila. Motor Co. • Phila. Seed 
etherill & Co. • Denny Building Co. ♦ Mastbaum Theatre • Milk Distrib. • Pitman Labs. • Rex Trailer • Willow Grove Park, Inc. •/ 
mat. Home Show • Mary Ellen- Distributors • Eureka Fed. Savings & Loan Assoc. ♦ Farmers Ins. • Don Gilmore • Hollywood Wild 
n'ng • Lewis & Lewis'* Lynn & Brooks Inc. • Macy's • Mayflower Warehouse * Maytag West Coast Co. • Pacific Grey Hound • 
! Distributing • Denco Sales • Albany Carpet Cleaning Co. • Amer. Radiator & Standard San. • Amer. Theaters Corp. • Boston 
gs Co. • John E. Cain Co. • S. C. Clayton Co. • DeMambro Radio Supply Co. • Eastern Co. • Electric Co. Adv. Pgm • Wm. File 

• Glenwood Range Co. • Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. • H. P. Hood & Sons • Howard Johnson Co. • C. M. Kimball Co. • IS 
ivan, Inc. • Sweetheart Cosmetic Co. • Table Talk Pastry Co. • Town & Country Homes • D. C. S. A. *• Dr. Enuf Vitamin Bev. • 
ids • Second Fed. Savings & Loan • George Heid Productions • Service Publishing Co. • Fernwood Sales Co. • Home Co. • Kep 
> Enterprises— Ice Capades.* Beneficial Saving Fund Soc. • Budget Uniform Center • Export-Import Clothing Co. • George Gorson 
r and Sons • Shapiro Shoe Stores • Strawbridge and Clothier. • Modern Sewing Machine Co. • Arthur Murray • Rosenthal's East 

• Delaware Steeplechase & Race Assn. • Denny Building Corp. • King's Men Ltd. ♦ Randolph Theater • Certified Automotive Serv 
salty Co. • Allen Floor Coverings • Berne Hi-Way Hatchery • Kenneth L. Bowton • Bueter Chevrolet • Bursley & Co. ♦ Childress P. 
ft Shop • Gerber Furniture Co. • Harges-Mills Candy Shop • J. C. Hirschman Co. • I MO Distributors • Indiana Farm Bureau Co-Op 
Camera Shop • Parrot Packing Co. • Peoples Trust & Savings Co. • Pioneer of Indiana • Pontiac Cities Service • Proctor Dress 
ihoe Store • Brink & Erb • Cooper Distributing Co. • General Dredging • Honegger's & Co. • Bueter Distributing Co. • Ellison 
ic • Alpenrose Dairy • Amato's Supper Club • Appliance Wholesalers • Arden Farms • Arlen's Electric Shaver Specialists 
alker Business College • Bell Potato Chip Co. • Benjamin Franklin Savings & Loan • Berko Electric Mfg. Co. • The Bip ' 
Graham Buick Co. • Broadway De Luxe Cab Co. • Byron's Home Furnishings • Cal Spray Dealers Assoc. • Calif. Pla' 
Packing Co. • Columbia River Packers Assoc. • Lee Cosart Motors • Davidson's Bakery ♦ Del Monte Meat Co. • D< 
Vest Coast • Equitable Savings & Loan • Fairview Farms • John Felker Co. • Fields Chevrolet Co. • Fitzgibbon Glas 
una • Spear & Co. • Stanley Warner Management Corp. • Williams, J. A. Co. • Amer. Beauty Sleep Prods. • Cox's D 
irpet Cleaning Co. • Nu-Life, Inc. • William T. Corbett • Independent Republicans • Harry Alan Sherman • Dairy Que 
ler Booster Club. • Repub. Exec. Comm. of Allegh. Co. • Dave Scharf Associates • Beverly Farms • Buhl Optical & Jewelry „„. 
lin & Go, Inc. • Friehofer Baking Co. • A. C. Mangels Ind., Inc. • Wilkening Mfg. Co. • Acme Packing Co. • Arden Farm Co. 
igandCo. • Craig Movie Supply Co. • Downtown Center Garage • Eggo Products • Flex Straw • Folgers Coffee Co. • Frying Chicken Rest. • r^- 
ne Circus • Ladies Choice • Listen &,Learn with Phonics • Leopard Cafe • Leslie Salt Co. • Latham Foundation • Luchetti Meats • Pacific Gas & j 
s Manor • Cecil Whitebone • United Vinters • Kahns Dept. Store • Allied Appliance Co. • The Barcolene Co. • Nissen Baking Corp. • Seiler Foods* 8 
sh Co., Inc. • Boston Consolidated Gas Co. ♦ Tupper Home Parties, Inc. • Clinton Clothing Mfg. Co. • Elm Farm Food Co. • Groveton Papers Co. • Whfl 
House Planter • Vimco Macaroni Prods. • Buckingham Village • Bucks County Dressed Poultry Co. • Geyelin, Inc. • Home Builders Assoc, of Phila. • HyS 
affner Paint Co. • Ellenberger Brothers • Ft. Wayne Jr. Chamber of Comm. • Grand Leader • McKinley Truck & Races • Cletus Miller Seeds • MontpeliM tone Co. • 'Afjg 
rewing • Hosier & Pearson ♦ Earl Zimmerman • Meyers & McCarthy ♦ Baade Floral Shop • Frankenmuth Brewing Co. • Fritz Electric Store • D. 0. McComb Funeral Homi 
;ate Fair • J. Homer Studebaker • Rye Agency • Appliance Merchandise, Inc. • Avco Mfg. Co. • Place, Inc. ♦ No. Ind. Shorthorn Breeders Assn. • Organic Soil Builders 

Lutheran Publicity Committee • Anderson Mattress ♦ Ft. Wayne Motors • House of Organs • Maurice Yoder • State Street Hardware • Boston Filter Co. • Boston Five, 
Fairbanks Exposition • Continental Upholstering Co. • Corcoran's, Inc. • Deerfield Fair Assoc. • First Nat. Bank of Boston • Franconir ssoc. • Gentles Baking Co. 

Sons, Inc. • Fidelity Phila. Trust • Ideal Mfg. Co. • Kasser Distillers • Keystone Auto Club • H. F. Ortlieb Brewing • Penn Jersey A M es * t>u '^- Distributors, 
nin's Sons • Twentieth Cent. Storm Sash Co. • Beetem & Brorby, Inc. • Downy-Flake Waffle Co. • Borge-Warner Corp. • Silf Skin . M. listen & S «. • Cullig 

it Toiletries ♦ Metro. Lincoln Mercury • Berlo Vending Co. • Custom Paint & Chem. • Di Paola Men's Clothes • Arcadia Theatre • Maico of Penne. Atmentha, 
is •. Calif. State Fair • Calso Co. • H. C. Capwell • Clearo Co. • Jes Cortez • Denalan Packing • Fireside Thrift Co. • W. P. Full r Gateway Chevrolet • Ge 
sh • Hillsdale Gardens • Ladies Choice Foods • Langedorf Bakeries • Mins Travel Center • Montgomery Ward • Pauson & Co. • » Producers of Calif, 

ler Fr.ey Co. • Stonestown • Thompson-Holmes • Union Furniture Co. • United Vintners • Les Vogel Chevrolet • W. J. Weinert L ^0. • William L. Piatt 
Ipapef Co. • Beacon Plastics Corp. • Bigelow-Kennard Co. • Bird & Sons, Inc. • Bonded TV Service • Brigham's, Inc. • Christian Science Church • First NaJ 
pitai' Service • MKM Knitting Mills ♦ Sands, Taylor & Wood Co. • Shreve, Crump & Lowe • Simmonds Upholstering Co. • Star Market C ||ate Televisiq 
laster Alsco ♦ James 0. Welch Co. • West Paint & Varnish Co. • Foster Sporting Goods • Francis Ford Motors • Wilson Line • Furniture .trig House 
lookie Co. • Granning & Treece • Gresham Auto Dealers • P. G. Gross Furniture Co. • Gunderson Bros. Engineering Corp. • Hamilton Furs • Helen Day Mu^ 
ales Corp. • Hogg Bros. • Hollywood Ford Motors • Hollywood Furniture • Homemakers Supply Co. • House of Nine • R. Hoyt Co. • Irish Linen Shop 
smobile • Mack's Dress Shop • Marks Furniture & Appliance • Met-AII Products • Meier & Frank Co. • Fred Meyer, Inc. • Mike De Cicco & Son • Mode 
ry Appliance Co. • Nalleys, Inc. • Frank Nau Pharmacy • Neuman's Radio & Electric • J. J. Newberry Co. • Niagara of Portland • Niklas & Son, Florist 
fie Supply • Nudelman Bros. • Copa Club • Pennzoil Co. • W. Homestead Distributing Co. • Atom-Otive Mfg. Corp. • Fairall Wallpaper Co. • Forbes Sert| 
ers Assn. of W. Pa. • Savage— Haldeman— Chrysler— Plymouth • F. A. Blum & Sons, Inc. • Motorola • Independent Wallpaper Co. • Lomakin Music • McC 
irms, Inc. • Beck's Charter Oaks • Dealers' Radio Svce. • Thompson— Haldeman— Chrysler— Plymouth • Willow Grove • H. W. Given Co. • Landis Motors, I m| 
ic. • American Preserve • Newburger & Co. • Phila. National Bank • Phillips Packing Co. • Pitman Labs. • Seaboard Seed Co. • Phila. Arena Corp. • Bee 
i & Robbins • Allied] Mills Inc. • Bluff ton Grocery Co. • Christian Science Comm. on Publ. for State of Indiana • First Missionary Church • Gospel Temple • HI 
j Center • Troy Laundry Co. • Weisser Patk U. Miss. Church • Wolf & Dessauer • Cliff Ayers Enterprises • Mr. Gerald Bowers • City Glass Specialty • Deluxe^ 
Ammonia Dealers • Cloverleaf Creamery' • Collins Motor Co. • Martins Nursery • Means-Buhl Co. • Rhoads-Morgan Paint Co. • Acme Quality Co. • Bowser Inc* 
ales Co. • Quality Furniture & Drapery • Ellenberger Bros. • Marks Camera Shops • One Hour Martinizing • Guy S. Means Co. • Russel Kruse • Pagoda Inn 
ons • Mass. Horticultural Society ♦ Mutual Savings Bank Assoc. • Nat. Cranberry Assoc. • N. E. Coke Co. • N. H. Recreation • N. H. State Planning & Developing 
er Co. • Whipple Co. • Whiting Milk Co. • Apex Tile Co. • Best Feeds & Farm Supplies, Inc. • Brookline Savings & Trust Co. • Capitol Contracting Co. • Crown R' 
rewing Co. • Fort Pitt Tomato Co. • Jot • Insured Savings & Loan Council • Keystone Floors, Inc. • Klein, Henry B. • Mabro Co. • May Stern, Inc. • Miller 
ber Co. • Re-Ly-On Prods. • Savage-Haldeman Co. • Star Upholstering Co. • Steiner Drapery Shop • Sub-O-Pane Mfg. Co. • Sun Drug Co. • Tom Tucker Be\% 
Der Co. • B. Thorpe Realtor • Gaudio Bros., Inc. • Proctor Electric • Becker Mills • Atlantic Refining Co. • Polar Cub Assoc. • Tasty Kake Co. • Dem. Campaignlrumm. of PTf 
0. • Ever Kleen Co. • Fashion Sewing Center • Flex Straw Co. • Flotill Prods. • Fosters Lunch Svce. • Golden Gate Kennel Club • Lucky Lager Brewing Co. • Mission CoupoflB 
Inc. • SF Auto Show • Thrifty Car Co. • Tuxedo Candy Co. • Weltner Pontiac Co. • Crocker Bank • Dr. Campbell • Calif. Spray Chem. • Foremost Dairies • Nat. Lead Co. • 
Baking Co. • Kleber's Luggage • Real Pie Bakers • Sanford Motors • United Baking Co. • Turnway Inn • Potter-McCune Co. • Camelot Farms • Assemblies of God • Allen 
erama Corp. • Phila. Transportation Co. • Arthur A. Shaw • Shedaker Kitchens • Temple Time • Tradesmen's Land Title Bank and Trust Co. • Walnut Street Fed. Savings ar 
Dairy Prods. • Roselli's Pure Foods • Garden State Racing Assoc. • Girard Trust Corn Exchange Bank • Knit King • Penna. Refining Co. • Phila. Inquirer • Apex Terminal W? 

• Howards Camera Shop • Alwin Color & Chemical Co. • Hydroponic Gardens • Pilgrim Theatre • Craine, Inc. • Anthony's Hawthorne • Gaymont's Specialities, Inc. • Mara 
Products, Inc. • Pendale Nurseries • Mrs. Roth's Noodles • Stylebrook Clothes • Tem-Te Steak Co. • Amstan Supply Co. • Broadloom Carpet Mart • Brown & Vaughan Deve 
its Sales • Wilmerding Bottling Co. • The Clean Sales Co. • Kaufmann's • Robert Morgan Dance Studio • T. K. Roofing Co. • Savage-Haldeman Co. • Best Feeds & Farm SupB 

4 Candy Co. • Foss-Hughes Co. . A. C. Kissling Co. ♦ Knot Mfg. Co. • Liberty Real Estate & Trust Co. • William S. Scull Co. • H. E. Snyder Cigar Co. • Zippy Prods . Girard M 
>ls ♦ Thompson Porcelite Paint • Food Fair Stores. Inc. • Mrs. Schlorer's. Inc. • Del. Vallev Corn. • Jackson & Mover • Raymond Rosen DisL • Serodv & Serodv Bldrs. • Com 





■j. Richards BercutPkg. • Del. State Poultry Com rru • Gorton-Pew Fisheries Co. • Keystone Macaroni Mfg. Co. • McGraw-Hill Book Co. • Science Mechanics • Cudahy Packin 
rttjverhail Co. • Italian Swiss Colony • Amer. Tractor Co. • Barbasol Co. • Book-of-the-Month Club • Chemicals, Inc. • Calavo Growers of Calif. • Coca Cola • Goodyfcar Batt 
ewigCo. • Minn. Mining & Mfg. Co. • MJ.8. Co. • Nocona Boot Co. • Norwegian Canners Assoc. • Northwest Airlines ♦ Pacific Tel&Tel Co. • Parks-Barnes, Inc. •."Union Oi 
Re II Drug Stores • C. F. Mueller Co. • Music Treasures of World • Norwich Pharmacal Co. • Paine, Webber, Jackson & Curtis • Phila. & Reading Coal & Iron Co. • Wrieatena I 
id. Inc. • John J. Crawley • Mohawk Air Lines, Inc. • N. Y. Central System • Amer. Machine & Foundry • Amer. Airlines.* Jos. Martinson & Com. • T.W.A. • Goebe! Brewm, 
Mric. • Myzon, Inc. • The Pinex Co. • Gospel Broadcasting Assoc. • Penrod Drilling Co. ♦ Fruit Industries, Inc. • Oregon-Wash.-Calif. Pear Bureau • Gen. Controls • Dolcin I 
get& Myers Tobacco Co. • Loew's Theaters, Inc. • Marine Sardine Ind. • Mentholatum Co. • Eveready Battery • N. Amer. Accident Ins. Co. • Golden Med. Disc. • Reader's D 
uenc. • Tintex • S. African Rock Lobster Assn., Inc. • Canada Dry Ginger Ale, Inc. • Catholic Digest • Food Specialties Co. • Golden Gift, Inc. • Laco Prods., Inc. • Prentice 




Appalachian Apple Service • Black Drought • Curtus Circulation Co. • Feen-A-Mint 
Kasco Mi lls, In c. • Silos • Rox Mason ry Prods. » Y ager Dr ug Co 

sdViiigs • G 
BVa^rrjMaknyrfCo. -I 

mc. • Ml!!! Wad ley 

Art Instruction Inc. 



Fabulon 




S. F. Whitman & Son, 
Chicks. 



Cat 

borrremis, 
cjio. • Nat. Brush Co. • Reed Candy Co. • Roto-Rooter • Wander Co. 
Jfeal Fast" • Gen. Retail Corp. • Honorbilt Prods. • Miller Brewing • 
A • Weather Proof • Mexana Heat Powder • Sarasota Terrace Hotel 
fcla. Distrib. • Proctor Electric • Endust Co. • V. Arena & Sons, Inc. 
i ; Tobacco • Bock Drug Co. • Scott Paper Co. '« Falstaff Brewing Co. 




•Avon • Sea pa k Frozen Foods • Turn 

ifeCo. • Hollingshead Corp. ♦ Richfielc* 

/clniks • Fradelis Foods > Lawry's Sala 

me Light Co. • Farm Bureau Ins. • Ka 

Jijrniture Co. * Reick Dairy Co. • Rhea 

jjq. • Thorofare Markets, Inc. • Thri 

Bird • Penna. Water Equip. • Pruyn I 

Perma-Stone Co. • Bon Bon Corp. • . 

Chetz Famous Food ♦ First Savh 

ikes Market « Kilpatricks Bakeries • 

I Co. • Adams & Swett Co. • Boston 

Cott Bottling Co. • Craftsman Ins 

Martin L. Hall • N. E. Gas & Elec 

| • Serta White Cross Co. • Whitir 

Pgh. Brewing Co. • Shadyside Pres 

j)airy Prods. • Pgh. Racing Assn. • Art 

^naire Corp. • Ritter Finance Co. • W 

cher Longstreth for Mayor • Cherry & 

Atlantic City Racing Assoc. • Trans I 

Dairy Co. • Fairway • Habegger Fu 

Co. • Lipkeys Speedways • Seyfei 

.'atter Hardware Co. ♦ Three Rivers Be 

alue Hat & Shoe Shop • Assoc. Gen. ( 

Chevrolet Co. • Bedell Store • Blacl 

Pies, Inc. • Bun 'N Burger ♦ Bres 

Cliff Gate Homes • Clow Roofing • 

ks Furniture • Electrical Distributors ♦ 

i ss Wallpaper & Paint Co. • Hagan Ice 

1 Farm Products Co. • A & B Smitl 

Co. • Edw3rd C. Boyle • Silo Ap 

ring Co. • Robert Curly • D 

rt « Burgermeister Beer • Davi 

'. ds. • Harvey Nash • King Beau 

s • Rancho Soup Co. • 

i Airlines, Inc. • Bryant ai 

rtps « Polack Bros. Sh 

er Chevrolet • 

Festival Musi 

grs • Hay 



A- Bed • 



ess • El V 

Co. • Mc( 

Essb Standard Oi 

Co: • Taylor-Reed I 

king Co. • Drewi 

urTfngfon Mills • Pressman 

Chun King Sales, Inc. • Wisconsin Agric. Dept. • Perkins Prods. • Kitchen of Sari 

Mysrik Adv. • Rath Packing Co. • Rival Packing Co. • Trenton Foods, Inc. • Waxed Paper Inst. • Piel 

United Vintners, Inc. • Nat. Aircraft Show • B. C. Remedy Co. • Briggs Cough Drops • Charles E. Hire 

i Fred Fear Co. • Snag Pruf. Zipper • C. M. Couglan • Westfield Mfg. Co. • Atlanta Sales • Chock Full 0' 

> Thorn McAn Shoes • Oscar Mayer Co. • Parsons Ammonia Co. • O'Henry ♦ Artloom Carpet Co. • Kr 



Hazel Bishop • Western Airlines • Mobilgas •. Janes Industries • Shulton, Inc. • A.C. Spark Plugs 



r. *;__ 



Brown & Haley Cand 
*" i Seal I 




What a year! Over 2500 advertisers bought WBC in 1955. 

Big advertisers bought WBC — 94 of America's 100 largest 
advertisers; 25 of the 28 companies doing a billion dollars 
worth of business, or more, a year. 

Local advertisers bought WBC — over 2200 of them. And 
these advertisers use the toughest of all yardsticks in choosing 
a station — sales. 

You should buy WBC. You'll get the audience coverage, 
the power and programs that sell. Check on WBC's 50,000- 
watt stations in the big markets where % of America shops. 
Call Eldon Campbell, WBC National Sales Manager, MUrray 
Hill 7-0808, New York, or your WBC station. 

*P. S. — He got a raise ! 

No selling campaign is complete 
without the WBC Stations 





WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING 
COMPANY, INC. 



RADIO 
BOSTON — WBZ+WBZ A 
PHILADELPHIA— KYW 
PITTSBURGH— KDK A 
FORT WAYNE— WOWO 
PORTLAND— KEX 

KPIX REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY, INC. 
ALL OTHER WBC STATIONS REPRESENTED BY FREE ft PETERS. 



TELEVISION 
BOSTON— WBZ-TV 
PHILADELPHIA— WPTZ 
PITTSBURGH— KDKA-TV 
SAN FRANCISCO— KPIX 



INC. 



■s Assoc. • uanr. wine Assoc. • unoinei oanay uo. • unzens reo. savings s toan • un ax uo. • uuDuque racking uo 
Van Camp • Trude of Calif. • Wesley Distrib. Co. • Craig Movie Supply • Gen. Beverages • Golden Grain Macaroni • Nurseryman's Exc 
Ciub « Connolly Buick Co. • Corcoran Co. • Pa. Railroad . E. M. Ryan, Inc. . Double H. Breakfast Orange Juice Co. ♦ Jamestown Upholste 
(Bros ♦ Liebman's Dept. Store . Linton's Rest. • Lit Bros. • Meg's Macaroni Co. . Ortlieb Brewing Co. . Phila. Electric Co. • Provident. Tn 
motion Olds • Wurts Dulles and Co. . Zippy Prods. . Phila. Nat. League • Repub. State Comm. . Ironees Company . Wm. Montgomery Co. . Everwe 
e Fair Assn • chard Ridge Country Club . A. H. Heine Co. . Holiday Lake . Noel's Service Center . Dean Nellans . Bob Berry-Ford . Central Lyons Club • Jerry Swanso 
p otarr Chip Co. • ftesseH Burnett • Charles Pontiac . Rustcraft Card Co. . West End Chevrolet . Adley Express Co., Inc. • Morrison & Schiff . Brockton Fair . Raytheon M 
* Springs . Graham Mfg. Co • Hamburg Bros. . Harmony Dairy . Lawrence Paint Co. . Proie Bros. . Pro- Kleen Industries, Inc. . Edgar Silver Food Broker . Sleepwell Prod: 
J'.Sons . Pitt Storm Window . U. S. Steel Workers Union . Business Training College • Nat. Record Mart . Thompson-Haldeman Co. • York Chem. Corp. . 



*- c « c« 



. ^unnlpp Wilk \nnt"i m Rprln Venriino C.n 



C. Schmidt & Son 
Phila. Inmnrer • Marsh man Pror 




ch. 



■PBH ■ i 



WISCONSIN 

M 





Where two more Agency Test Studies are under way! 







HAYDN R. EVANS, Gen. Mgr. Rep. WEED TELEVISION 



90 



SPONSOR 






1111 A 


ITHAn 


JULY TO 


in tlex \ III 


\ 


VI K swomi hull', volume O 


DECEMBER 
19 5 5 


131 "j 


l\\J\JKl> 


Issued every 6 months 



Advertising Agencies 

Ted Grunewald, Hicks & Greist, profile 

Norman Strouse, J. Walter Thompson, profile 

Harry Bennett, Bryan Houston, profile 

Walter Craig, Norman, Craig & Kummel, profile 

Lloyd Whitebrook, Kastor, Chesley & Clifford, 

profile 

Rosser Reeves, Ted Bates, profile 

Terence Clyne, McCann Erickson, profile 

Wm. Philip Smith, Charles W. Hoyt, profile 

Tv responsible for agency switching: Csida 

Myron P. Kirk, Kudner advertising, profile 

John Sheehan, Cunningham and Walsh, profile 

Ferment underlying shifting of accounts 

Norman Mathews, Dancer-Fitzgerald-Sample, pro- 
file 



Is "marketing" the newest ad agency tool? — 

The top 20 air agencies _. _ — 

Wm. R. Hillenbrand, Bryan Houston, profile- 
Arthur Duram, Fuller & Smith & Ross, profile. 

Automotive 



Radio helps make Boston top Nash territory- _ 

Radio helps build the biggest Buick agency 

Dealers use all-night telecasts to sell cars 



11 July 

25 July 
8 Aug. 

22 Aug. 

5 Sept. 
19 Sept. 

3 Oct. 
17 Oct. 
31 Oct. 
31 Oct. 
14 Nov. 
28 Nov. 
28 Nov. 

12 Dec. 
12 Dec. 
12 Dec. 

26 Dec. 



p. 34 

p. 70 

p. 68 

p. 84 



84 
62 
72 
78 
26 
66 
62 
28 
62 



p. 29 

p. 36 

p. 63 

p. 72 



25 July p. 
19 Sept. p. 
31 Oct. p. 



Broadcast Advertising Problems and 
Developments 

Let's bring spot spending out in the open 

Has radio done enough in updating its methods? 

Should Hollywood get it for free? 

Are you up on all ways you can buy net radio? 

Fall tv network lineup 

How daylight saving snarls clearances 

The radio disk jockey today as a salesman 

Are sponsors dropping the axe too fast? 

Does NARTB television code need more teeth?—. 
RCA's color tv drive like push for 45 rpm: Csida 

Does Monitor sales strategy help, hurt radio? 

Is the iron curtain on spot tv $ lifting? 

How to get "tear sheets" in radio 

How would publication of spot radio and tv $ 

figures be useful to sponsors, agencies? 

Why spot business is booming-— 

Are package goods in back seat in night tv?. ._ 

The industry's personnel pool . 

Spot radio fights back 

One down, one to go (spot spending problems) 

What would you advise sponsors whose products 

you sell in your store? 

Getting maximum visual impact from package on 

color tv and store shelf 

How to keep an eye and ear on the competition 

How can sponsors best use closed-circuit tv? 

Why today's timebuyers need two heads .._. 

The great debate on network show control 

Today's account executive: funnel for expand- 
ing services _.. 

Profit is a many-splendored thing: Csida 

A broadcaster-turned-sponsor looks at air media.... 

Biggest ad manager headaches 

So you think you've got headaches (re: reps) 

Are you neglecting talent research? 

Many print ads now come from tv: Foreman 

1955's most important tv-radio developments 

The psychiatrist and the account executive 

What makes the radio-tv director run? 

Major tv and radio trends for 1956 — 



Clothing and Accessories 

Robert Hall continues promotion with radio-tv 

"There's no sale like wholesale" (Ripley Stores) 



34 

44 
56 



25 July 


P- 


25 


25 July 


P- 


64 


8 Aug. 


P- 


31 


8 Aug. 


P. 


36 


8 Aug. 


P- 


40 


8 Aug. 


P. 


42 


8 Aug. 


P- 


62 


22 Aug. 


p. 


44 


22 Aug. 


P- 


82 


5 Sept. 


I'- 


34 


5 Sept. 


ll- 


39 


5 Sept. 


p. 


42 


5 Sept. 


P- 


52 


5 Sept. 


p. 


78 


19 Sept. 


p. 


29 


19 Sept. 


P- 


34 


19 Sept. 


P- 


42 


3 Oct. 


p. 


31 


3 Oct. 


P- 


38 


3 Oct. 


P- 


48 


3 Oct. 


P- 


56 


17 Oct. 


P- 


46 


17 Oct. 


P- 


70 


31 Oct. 


P- 


31 


31 Oct. 


P. 


38 


14 Nov. 


P- 


34 


28 Nov. 


P- 


24 


28 Nov. 


P- 


32 


28 Nov. 


p. 


40 


12 Dec. 


P- 


40 


12 Dec. 


I'- 


46 


26 Dec. 


ll • 


8 


26 Dec. 


p. 


25 


26 Dec. 


P- 


32 


26 Dec. 


P- 


36 


26 Dec. 


P- 


70 


S 

25 July 


P- 


62 


8 Aug. 


P- 


44 



Commercials ami Sales Aids 



Can commercials entertain and sell? _ 

Are you up on the ways you can buy net radio? 

How long before a radio jingle jangles? 

How to get "tear sheets" in radio .... 

How would publication of spot radio and tv $ 

figures be useful to sponsors, agencies? 

Admen don't know their women 

Radio commercials, too, can entertain 

How to sell tv when you can't show the package ... 
Getting maximum visual impact from package on 

color tv and store shelf 

Commercials in spectaculars misfire: Foreman 

Tv can carry ball for established products, too: 

Foreman 

Top radio commercials of 1955 

Don't let fear of glare dull tv commercials 

Pluses if you add radio to a tv campaign 

How would you advise handling show-drawn 

mail? 

Listing of Radio and Television Results: 



Radio results 



Television results 



92 ways to make radio work 



25 July 


P- 


30 


8 Aug. 


P- 


36 


22 Aug. 


P- 


42 


5 Sept. 


P- 


52 


5 Sept. 


P- 


78 


3 Oct. 


P- 


34 


3 Oct. 


P- 


44 


3 Oct. 


P- 


46 


3 Oct. 


P- 


56 


17 Oct. 


P- 


11 


31 Oct. 


P- 


9 


31 Oct. 


P- 


40 


14 Nov. 


P- 


41 


28 Nov. 


P- 


37 


12 Dec. 


P- 


70 


25 July 


P- 


63 


22 Aug. 


P- 


64 


19 Sept. 


P- 


54 


17 Oct. 


p. 


53 


14 Nov. 


P- 


56 


12 Dec. 


P- 


64 


8 Aug. 


P- 


64 


5 Sept 


P- 


64 


3 Oct. 


P- 


52 


31 Oct. 


P- 


56 


28 Nov. 


P- 


52 


26 Dec. 


P- 


78 


26 Dec. 


p. 


39 



Costs 

Is the iron curtain on spot tv $ lifting 

Net tv show costs: this fall 13 top $100,000 ...... 

Are you nonchalant about net tv's lost production 
dollars? 



Drugs and Cosmetics 

Summer selling — drug firm keeps Lucy on 

Madame Rubinstein woos mass audience 

Edward Gellert, Sofskin Products, profile 



5 Sept, p. 42 
5 Sept. p. 49 

28 Nov. p. 38 



25 July 


p. 62 


8 Aug. 


p. 34 


12 Dec. 


p. 18 



Fall Facts: 1955 



The top 20 trends this fall 

My advice to admen on fall buying.. 
My advice on fall timebuying.. 



Are you planning a media test for fall? 

Fall trends and predictions: 

Network and spot tv — 

Tv basics 

Film basics 

Spot and network radio 

Timebuying basics 



11 July p. 44 

11 July p. 46 

11 July p. 52 

11 July p. 56 

11 July p. 63 

11 July p. 113 

11 July p. 153 

11 July p. 209 



Farm Radio and Tv 

Farm radio helps up insurance sales 275% — 
Farm radio and tv 



Are admen provincial about farm radio-tv? — 

A buyer and seller look at farm air media 

Why farm director sells more per ad dollar — 

Farm radio-tv results 

Farm radio-tv stations 



3 Oct. 
31 Oct. 
31 Oct. 
31 Oct. 
31 Oct. 
31 Oct. 
31 Oct. 



23 JANUARY 1956 



40 
43 
44 
46 
48 
50 
.103 



91 



Foods and Beverages 

B & M results, 25th week 25 July p. 32 

B & M results, final week-— 8 Aug. p. 28 

Chunky goes national on 100% tv diet 22 Aug. p. 48 

Arthur E. Goldman, Gunther Brewing, profile 5 Sept. p. 24 

How B & M views its tv test one month after final 

results 5 Sept. p. 46 

How to enthuse salesmen over your campaign 19 Sept. p. 32 

Malcolm P. Taylor, Reed Co., profile 3 Oct. p. 42 

"Man, oh Manischewitz" — what a spot campaign .. 31 Oct. p. 34 

Aborn stretches radio coverage at low cost 28 Nov. p. 35 

Tea Council's use of spot tv ._ 12 Dec. p. 50 

Jerold Hoffberger, National Brewing, profile 26 Dec. p. 18 

Three months after tv: B & M sales up 107% 26 Dec. p. 38 

Foreign and International 

Canadian radio and tv: 1955 — _ 22 Aug. p. 51 

Canada: the boom resumes 22 Aug. p. 52 

Canadian radio: daytime is hot 22 Aug. p. 54 

Canadian tv: 50% saturation by end of '55 22 Aug. p. 56 

Canadian radio facts 22 Aug. p. 58 

Canadian television facts 22 Aug. p. 60 

U. S. advertisers in foreign markets __ 19 Sept. p. 52 



Miscellaneous Products & Services 



Robert Strumpen-Darrie, Berlitz School, profile. 

Lawrence L. Mack, Slenderella, profile 

James Hays Cobb, American Airlines, profile... 
Union uses net radio newscast as p.r. aid. 



Sandran commercials make impact with tiny bud- 
gets and giant stunts 

Bruce Enderwood, Gruen Watch Co., profile _ 

Spot used to build ball points 

Farm radio helps up insurance sales 275% 

Spot radio rescues a bumper prune crop 

Schick bids for razor supremacy 

Spot radio-tv made Old Spice largest seller 

Henry R. Geyelin, Metropolitan Life, profile... 

Robert A. Seidel, RCA Consumer Products, pro- 
file 

Radio-print break sales records for Bon Marche.... 

Alcoa enters "get-out-and-sell" era 

Benjamin Abrams, Emerson, profile 

Will Pepsodent be spot radio's biggest client in 
1956? _ 



25 July 


P- 


20 


8 Aug. 


P- 


24 


22 Aug. 


P- 


24 


22 Aug. 


P- 


76 


5 Sept. 


P- 


44 


19 Sept. 


P- 


22 


19 Sept. 


P- 


52 


3 Oct. 


P- 


40 


17 Oct. 


P- 


41 


17 Oct. 


P- 


44 


17 Oct. 


P- 


76 


31 Oct. 


P- 


24 


14 Nov. 


P- 


22 


14 Nov. 


P- 


36 


14 Nov. 


P- 


38 


28 Nov. 


P- 


22 



26 Dec. p. 30 



Negro Radio Section 



Negro Radio Section 



Hit-and-miss sales pattern 

Birth of a sale 

Over 600 stations strong today 

Negro radio results 

Basic facts about Negro radio's size . 



19 Sept. 
19 Sept. 
19 Sept. 
19 Sept. 
19 Sept. 
19 Sept. 



p. 107 
p. 108 
p. 110 
p. 112 
p. 114 
p. 117 



Programing 

Fall programing highlights: Foreman 11 July p. 16 

Big shows bigger: Csida 11 July p. 30 

Has radio gone far enough in updating methods? 25 July p. 64 

Mickey Mouse may up sets-in-use: Foreman 8 Aug. p. 9 

It's the golden age in tv programing: Csida 22 Aug. p. 34 

Animal soap opera and Puss'n Boots prospects..- 22 Aug. p. 46 
Does the Monitor sales strategy help or hurt 

radio? 5 Sept. p. 39 

Can big money alone build audiences for shows? 19 Sept. p. 58 

Five big $64,000,000 tv questions 17 Oct. p. 31 

ABC Radio turns to capsule programing 17 Oct. p. 37 

Is radio overdoing music-and-news programing?.... 14 Nov. p. 32 
It's not what you play, it's how you program: 

Csida 12 Dec. p. 26 

Radio giveaways: fastest, cheapest sales tool 12 Dec. p. 38 



Research 

The twenty top trends this fall 

Everyone's planning tv set and coverage studies 

Industry need for authentic tv set count 

One down, one to go (spot spending problem) 

Videotown 1955: the longer they own, the more 

they watch 

Eight big needs in radio-tv research 

Top radio commercials of 1955 

Will tv's buying-blind era end in 1956? 

Tv's effect on a previously unexposed market. 



Retail 

Radio-tv helped Vim add 41 stores in 7 years 

Use of tv by department store.. 

A symphony sells for a supermarket 

Tv usage by department stores. 



11 July 


P- 


44 


22 Aug. 


P- 


39 


5 Sept. 


P- 


81 


3 Oct. 


P- 


38 


17 Oct. 


P- 


34 


17 Oct. 


P- 


42 


31 Oct. 


P- 


40 


14 Nov. 


P. 


29 


12 Dec. 


P- 


50 



5 Sept. p. 54 

5 Sept. p. 81 

12 Dec. p. 44 

26 Dec. p. 66 



Television 

Tv basics 

Tv studios need air conditioning: Csida 

Is the iron curtain on spot tv $ lifting? 

Net tv show costs: this fall 13 top $100,000 

Can big money prizes alone build audiences? . 

Electronicam: how fast? how much? how good? 

Stations equipped to transmit color 

What advantages do Hollywood and New York 

each offer for television production? 

How is the public reacting to color tv at the re- 
tail level? 

Beauty, brains — what a combination! 



11 July 


p. 


113 


8 Aug. 


P- 


26 


5 Sept. 


P- 


42 


5 Sept. 


p. 


49 


19 Sept. 


P. 


58 


31 Oct. 


P- 


54 


14 Nov. 


P. 


48 


14 Nov. 


P- 


58 


28 Nov. 


P- 


64 


12 Dec. 


P- 


35 



Television Film 

Film basics _ 

How film sponsors promote their shows 



11 July 


p. 


133 


12 Dec. 


P- 


42 


[25 July 


P- 


50 


22 Aug. 


P- 


72 


3 Oct. 


P. 


64 


17 Oct. 


P- 


54 


14 Nov. 


P- 


50 


1 12 Dec. 


P- 


52 


f 11 July 


p. 


36 


8 Aug. 


P- 


58 


5 Sept. 


p. 


60 


3 Oct. 


P- 


50 


31 Oct. 


P- 


58 


28 Nov. 


P« 


44 


{ 26 Dec. 


P- 


68 



Tv film shows recently made available for syndi- 
cation 



SPONSOR-Tele-Pulse ratings of top spot film shows 



Time Buying 

My advice on fall timebuying 11 July p. 52 

Timebuyers of the U.S., part I . 11 July p. 57 

Timebuying basics 11 July p. 209 

Timebuyers of the U.S., part II 25 July p. 35 

Timebuyers of the U.S., part III 8 Aug. p. 45 

Why today's timebuyers need two heads 31 Oct. p. 31 

Timebuyers of the U.S. (supplement) 14 Nov. p. 42 

Which one is you? baby portraits 28 Nov. p. 30 

Timesavers for timebuyers 28 Nov. p. 42 



Tobacco 

Roger M. Greene, Philip Morris, profile 11 July p. 28 

Fastest-growing filter tip (Marlboro) 25 July p. 28 

There are savvy agencies everywhere: Csida 19 Sept. p. 26 



BINDERS accommodating a six-month supply of issues, $4.00 each; two tor $7.00 
BOUND VOLUMES (two volumes) per year, $15.00 



92 



SPONSOR 



'•1! 




YOMJ MIGHT PIT THE SHOT W2 



" * 



BIT. 



AMERICAN RESEARCH BUREAU 
February, 1955 Report 

GRAND RAPIDS— KALAMAZOO 





Number of Quarter Hours 
With Higher Rating 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
7 a.m. — 5 p.m. 
5 p.m. — 1 1 p.m. 


WKZO-TV 

144 
83 


Station B 
56 
37 


SATURDAY & SUNDAY 
10 a.m. — 1 1 p.m. 


80 


24 



NOTE: Survey based on sampling in the following propor- 
tions — Grand Rapids (45%), Kalamazoo (19%), 
Battle Creek (19%), Muskegon (17%). 



^ TV -'* 




WKZO-TV — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOO-BATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO — GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM — GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
KOLN-TV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD RADIO — PEORIA, ILLINOIS 



YOU NEED WKZO-TV 
TO PUT SALES ACROSS 
IN WESTERN MICHIGAN! 

American Research Bureau figures for Grand Rapids-Kala- 
mazoo show that WKZO-TV is almost a 3-to-l favorite over 
the next station, morning, afternoon and night! 

WKZO-TV is the Official Basic CBS Television Outlet for 
Kalamazoo-Grand Rapids. Telecasts on Channel 3 with 
100,000 watts from a 1000' tower. Serves one of America's 
top-20 TV markets — almost 600,000 television homes in 
29 Western Michigan and Northern Indiana counties! Ask 
Avery-Knodel about availabilities. 

100,000 WATTS • CHANNEL 3 • 1000' TOWER 

YfKIOTV 

Kalamazoo - Grand Rapids 

and Greater Western Michigan 

Avery-Knodel, Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



* Parry O'Brien set this world's record on June 5, 1953, at Compton, California. 



Famous on the local scene . . . 








> 









national prominence without first achieving greatness at h< 

So with the group known collectively as Storer stations. 
Look at each one individually. You will fin 
the church, the school, the hoi 
— working together to impro 








4 
I 



/ V* 



has made Storer stations national institutio 



A Storer station is a local station. 



"J^UiiV 




• 1 



&HF 



•> : » 




^ 




M 



%>\ \ 




- 



yet known throughout the nation. 




Utter 1-8689 



HD 



.1 LU LUiJj JJ IJJ JU 



ft 



m warn ii 











Chart 


covers half -hour syndicated film J' 






Top 10 shows in 10 or more markets 
Period 1-7 November 7955 

TITLE, SYNDICATOR. PRODUCER, SHOW TYPE 


Average 
ratings 


7-STATION 
MARKETS 


5-STATION 
MARKETS 


4-STATION MARKETS 


J-8T/ J 

MAR a 


R»nk Past" 
M rank 


N.Y L.A. 


Boston Mnpls. S. Fran. 


Seattle. 
Atlanta Chicago Detroit Tacoma Wash. 


1 
Bait. Btl f". 


I 


2 


Mr. District Attorney, Ziv (M) 


20.0 


9.9 

knxt 
10:00pm 


24.5 7 7.8 76.0 

wnac-tv kstp-tv kron-tv 
10:30pm 10:30pm 10:30pm 


20.5 75.8 78.2 

waga-tv wwj-tv klng-tv 
10:30pm 8:30pm 9:00pm 


76.2 2; 

wbal-tv wl s- 
10: '30pm 7:{ ,,i 


2 


1 


I Led Three Lives, Ziv (M) 


18.8 


2.2 72.7 

wpix kttv 
10:00pm 8:30pm 


23.5 78.2 77.2 

wnac-tv kstp-tv kron-tv 
7:00pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 


76.2 7 7.9 78.2 76.7 73.0 

wsb-tv wgn-tv wjbk-tv ktnt-tv wrc-tv 
7:00pm 9:30pm 10:30pm 10:00pm 10:30pm 


. !. 

76.4 2l»| 

wbal-tv wil 
10:30pm 10:1 'T 


3 


7 


Waterfront, MCA Roland Reed (A) 


18.1 


7.3 74.3 

wabd kttv 
7:30pm 7:30pm 


73.9 7.2 22.5 

wnac-tv keyd-tv kron-tv 
7:00pm 8:00pm 8:30pm 


77.2 8.5 75.4 78.6 22.8 

waga-tv wgn-tv wjw-tv komo wtop-tv 
7:00pm 9:00pm 10:30pm 8:30pm 10:30pm 


73.7 7<i| 

wmar-tv wg < «] 
10:30pm T:lJ 


4 


4 


Man Behind the Badge, MCA-TV Film (M) 


17.8 




22.7 3.0 75.0 

wnac-tv kstp-tv kron-tv 
10:30pm 5:30pm 10:30pm 


73.5 70.5 

wjbk-tv wmal-tv 
10:30pm 10:30pm 


we 


5 


6 


Badge 714, NBC Film (D) 


17.1 


4.7 78.8 

wpix kttv 
8:30pm 7:30pm 


77.7 22.0 24.5 

wnac-tv kstp-tv kpix 
6:30pm 9:30pm 9:00pm 


76.9 7 7.9 78.8 75.4 

wgn-tv wwj-tv king-tv wrc-tv 
8:00pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 


72.2 

wbal-tv 
10:30pm 


5 




Highway Patrol, Ziv (A) 


17.1 


7.9 8.2 

wrca-tv kttv 
7:00pm 9:00pm 


73.0 72.4 8.2 

wbz-tv wcco-tv kron-tv 
4:15pm 10:00pm 11:00pm 


74.5 6.9 76.0 72.5 72.9 

waga-tv wbkb wjbk-tv komo wtop-tv 
7:30pm 9:00pm 10:30pm 7:00pm 7:30pm 


4 


7 


8 


Amos 'n' Andy, CBS Film (C) 


16.7 


3.4 73.7 

wcbs-tv knxt 
2:00pm 5:30pm 


72.9 

wnac-tv 
2:30pm 


75.9 8.7 12.0 72.2 

waga-tv wbkb wwj-tv wtop-tv 
7:00pm 9:30pm 7:00pm 7:30pm 


72.4 7C | 

wbal-tv wbe r ■ 
7:00pm 1:3' il_ 


8 




Superman (Flamingo) (K) 


15.5 


70.4 72.2 

wrca-tv kttv 
6:00pm 7:00pm 


20.5 70.5 72.9 

wnac-tv wtcn-tv kgo-tv 
6:30pm 6:30pm 6:30pm 


27.2 75.5 73.7 74.4 74.5 

wsb-tv wbkb wxyz-tv king-tv wrc-tv 
7:00pm 5:00pm 6:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pra 


72.7 2C[f 

wbal-tv wbe 1 
7:00pm 7:0i ■__ 


9 




Cisco Kid, Ziv (W) 


15.4 


3.9 5.3 

wabe-tv kabc-tv 
6:00pm 6:00pm 


74.8 22.4 74.7 

wnac-tv wcco-tv kron-tv 
9:00pm 4:30pm 6:30pm 


74.9 78.4 76.2 73.0 74.9 

waga-tv wbkb wxyz-tv komo wtop-tv 
5:30pm 5:00pm 6:30pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 


77.2 27 f 

wbal-tv wbe' 1 
7:00pm 7:01 K 


10 




Range Rider, CBS Film (W) 


14.4 




23.4 6.9 

ubm-tv kpix 
7:00pm 5:00pm 


7.9 72.7 73.8 

wbbm-tv ktnt-tv wtop-tv 
12:00N 7:00pm 6:00pm 


Ut! 
















Rank Past* 
nw rank 


Top 70 shows in 4 to 9 markets 




I 




Eddie Cantor, Ziv (C) 


19.3 


7.9 

kttv 
10:00pm 


7.0 75.2 

wtcn-tv kron-tv 
9:30pra 10:00pm 


75.4 9.0 77.7 

wnbq wjbk-tv king-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 10:00pm 


9.5 

wbal-tv 
10:30pm 


2 




Passport to Danger, ABC Film, Hal Roach (A) 


18.8 


6.0 

kcop 
7:30pm 


4.7 17.2 

kcvd-tv kpix 
7:30pm 7:00pm 






3 


1 


Doug. Fairbanks Presents. ABC Films (D) 


17.3 




8.7 

kstp-tv 
6:00pm 


7.9 7.2 

wbkb wxvz-tv 
10:00pm 7:00pm 


78 

wber 
10:3 


4 




I Search for Adventure, Bagnall (A) 


13.6 


7.8 73.8 

wpix kcop 
7:30pm 7:30pm 


22.4 

kovr-tv 
7:30pm 


7.7 22.7 

wxvz-tv king-tv 
10:30pm 7:00pm 




5 




Count of Monte Cristo, TPA, (A) 


13.3 


9.2 

kttv 
8:00pm 


70.9 75.2 

wcco-tv wpix 
7:30pm 10:00pm 


9.9 

waga-tv 
7:00pm 


78. 

when 

7:30- 


e 


7 


Mayor of the Town, MCA-TV Film, Gross 

Krasne (D) 


12.3 




5.2 

kevd-tv 
7:30pm 


7.2 76.2 73.5 73.0 

wsb-tv wnbq wwj-tv komo 
3:30pm 10:00pm 7:00pm 6:00pm 


75 

wgr- *, 
7 :00 ' 


7 




Meet Corliss Archer, Ziv (C) 


12.2 




.9 

wmur 
8:00pm 


7.5 

wjbk-tv 
7:00pm 


70.9 73. 

wbal-tv wben- 
6:00pm 7:00p 


8 


8 


Dr. Hudson's Secret Journal, MCA-TV 

Film (D) 


11.6 


70.9 

kttv 
9:00pm 


74.7 

wcco-tv 
9:30pm 


75.0 5.5 8.7 

waga-tv wwj-tv king-tv 
10:30pm 7:00pm 9:30pm 


78. 

ngr- 

10:30 


9 




Gene Autry, CBS Film (W) 


11.5 


4.0 3.7 

wabc-tv kcop 
6:00pra 9:00pm 


70.4 

wnac-tv 
6:00pm 


7 7.2 

wlw-a 
7:30pm 


72. 

wben 
5:30i 


10 




Playhouse, The, MCA-TV Film (D) 


10.9 


3.2 

wabd 
10:30pm 




74.7 

wbkb 
9:30 am 





Show typo symbols: (A) adventure; (C) comedy; (D) drama; (Doc) documentary; (K) kids; 
(M) mystery; (Mu) musical: (SF) Science Fiction: (W) Western. Films listed are syndicated. 
half-hour length, telecast in four or more markets. The average rating is an unweighted average 
*< Individual market ratings listed above. Blank space indicates film not broadcast in this 



market 1-7 November. While network shows are fairly stable from one month to another tt» 
markets in which they are shown, this is true to much lesser extent with syndicated show TO 
should be borne In mind when analyzing rating trends from one month to another in thinijt 
•Refers to last month's chart. If blank, show was not rated at all in last chart or was t,J><» 



December ratings will appear in next issue 



■jistaws 

! (; t |r mac/e for tv 

LJI 



c^TION MARKETS 



ius Ml!*. Phila. St. L. 



» 14.2 9.7 24.7 



Jtv wtmj-tv 
lm 11:00pm 



wptz 
10:30pm 



ksd-tv 
10:00pm 



i<l 16.2 7 7.9 20.9 



£ wtmj-tv 
;m 10:30pm 



wcau-tv 
7:00pm 



ksd-tv 
10:00pm 



78.0 74.9 76.5 



wtmj-tv 
10:00pm 



wcau-tv 
6:30pm 



kwk-tv 
10:00pm 



26.5 

'-tv wtmj-tv 
n 7:30pm 



75.2 

ksd-tv 
10:00pm 



7 7.4 26.2 



wcau-tv 
7:00pm 



ksd-tv 
9:30pra 



72.9 8.2 78.9 



-tv wtml-tv 
pm 10:30pm 



wfll-tv 
10:30pm 



kwk-tv 
9:30pm 



77.4 77.7 70.0 

i-tv wtan-tv wcau-tv ksd-tv 
6:30pm 7:00pm 5:30pm 



.0 72.9 

wlsn-tv 
pm 6:00pm 



72.4 

ksd-tv 
3:00pm 



70.4 

ksd-tv 
11:30am 



2-STATION MARKETS 



Birm. Charlotte Dayton New. Or. 



S4.3 76.8 34.0 



wbtv wlw-d 
8:00pm 10:30pm 



wdsu-tv 
10:30pm 



24.0 59.0 27.3 



wabt 
9 :30pm 



wbtv wlw-d 
9:00pm 9:30pm 



79.8 57.5 20.8 



wabt 
9:30pm 



wbtv whio-tv 
8:30pm 7:00pm 



25.0 

wbrc-tv 
9 :30pm 



29.3 

whlo-tv 
9 :30pm 



30.0 

wbrc-tv 
10 :00pm 



25.3 

whlo-tv 
10:80pm 



26.0 35.3 32.3 38.5 



wbrc-tv 

10:00pm 



wbtv whlo-tv 

10:30pm 9:00pm 



wdsu-tv 
10:00pm 



22.8 26.3 



wbrc-tv 
10:00pm 



wbtv 
1:00pm 



57.8 

wdsu-tv 
9 :30pra 



30.8 

wbtv 
8 :30pm 



25.8 

wdsu-tv 
5:00pm 



73.8 

wbrc-tv 
12:30pm 



25.8 

wd»u-tv 
5:30pm 



73.6 30.8 



wlw-d 
6:00pm 



wdsu-tv 
5:30pm 



0.9 30.2 7 7.0 

ns-tv wtra]-tT wcau-tv 
30pm 8:00pm 10:30pm 



8.2 74.9 

ns-tv wxlx 
30pm 10:00pm 



'7.5 

bns-tv 
:30pm 



24.7 6.5 

wtmj-tv wpte 
9:30pm 6:00pm 



57.3 

wbtv 
9:30pm 



35.3 

wdsu-tv 
10:00pm 



30.0 

wbrc-tv 
9:30pm 



7 7.8 50.8 

wlw-d wdsu-tv 
7:00pm 9:00pm 



75.8 

wbrc-tv 
6:00pm 



27.3 

wbtv 
12:30pm 





f0.7 


73.7 






ins-tv 
:30pm 


ksd-tv 
9 :30pm 










27.3 






whio-tv 
7:00pm 






36.3 6.3 






wbtv wlw-d 
6:45pm 2:00pm 



} 10. Classification as to number of stations in market Is Pulse's 
k e ,^ etermlne s number by measuring which stations are actually 
by homes In the metropolitan area of a Riven market even though 

itself may be outside metropolitan area of the market. 



r ■ 






. . . FOR GIVING SOUTH BEND-ELKHART 
TELEVISION VIEWERS THE TYPE OF 
PROGRAMS THEY PREFER. THE TOP 26 
NETWORK TV PROGRAMS IN THIS AREA 
ARE CBS SHOWS- WSBT-TV CARRIES 
THEM ALL, EXCLUSIVELY. 




; The television audience surveys of the South Bend Market 
all tell about the same story. WSBT-TV DOMINATES 
the market. The latest survey, made by the American 
Research Bureau (Nov., 1955) gives further proof. It 
reveals that in the South Bend-Elkhart market . . . 

• The top 26 network TV programs in this area are CBS shows — 
carried by WSBT-TV exclusivel y! 

• The 31 most popular TV programs, both local and network — (37 
of the top 40, and 42 of the top-rated 50!) are carried by WSBT-TV. 

• During the prime evening viewing hours (6:00 to 10:30) almost 
3 times as many people watch WSBT-TV as any other single station — 
the WSBT-TV audience is greater than the combined total of all other 
stations which can be seen in this area! 

• When the same program was carried by all three local stations at 
the same time (President Eisenhower, Nov. 11), WSBT-TV enjoyed 
a viewing audience 14 times greater than the next closest station. 

Get all the facts on WSBT-TV and its prosperous 14- 
county coverage area. Learn more about this remarkable 
market where 95% of the TV homes are UHF equipped 
to receive WSBT-TV. Write for free market data book. 



FIVE TOP-RATED SHOWS OF EACH OF THE SOUTH BEND- 
ELKHART STATIONS— AND THE RATINGS OF EACH SHOW 



WSBT-TV 

Program Rating 

1. $64,000 Question 57.0 
1. 1 Love Lucy 56.6 

3. Ed Sullivan 51.8 

4. I've Got A Secret 48.1 

5. Climax 47.9 



STATION "A" 



Program 
Lux Theatre 
Hit Parade 
Perry Como 
Roy Rogers 
George Gobel 



Rating 
24.2 
23.5 
20.2 
18.1 
18.0 



STATION "B" 



Program 
Pro Football 
Disney land 
Lawrence Welk 
Rin Tin Tin 
Dollar A Second 



Rating 
21.4 
19.6 
18.0 
13.7 
10.9 



WSBT 



TV 



CHANNEL 



CBS... A CBS BASIC OPTIONAL STATION 



ASK PAUL H. RAYMER COMPANY 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 





MAKE-UP KIT 






APPLIANCES 


SPONSOR: Charles Antell AGENCY: Joseph Katz, Baltimore 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Although a price tag of $5 
is generally considered high for a mail order item on tv, 
the Charles Antell Co. sold a total of 6,317 items at this 
price in 10 days. A make-up kit was advertised on a 
quarter-hour participation in the Bill Ballance show and 
the Dick Garton movie, both daytime programs as well as 
in a half hour evening movie. The high ratio of phone 
orders (4,834) to mail orders (1,483) indicates that the 
viewers were forcefully sold by the tv advertising. Cost of 
the campaign: $5,171 or about 82c per order. 

KCOP, Los Angeles PROGRAMS: Participations 




SPONSOR: National Appliance AGENCY: Ad- Video Productions 
and Television 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The sponsor has two tv 
shows on WREX-TV, Talent Parade {Sundays at 4:00 
p.m. for $216 per week) and a late night movie strip. The 
former program is of the type where viewers vote for the 
talent on the show. One Sunday show drew 4,800 votes, a 
total which the agency reports "completely astounded the 
manufacturer my client represents." The agency asserts 
that Whirlpool ivashers are on back order at the factory 
"because of the great amount of sales due to National's 
program schedule on WREX-TV" 

WREX-TV, Rockford. 111. PROGRAM: Talent Parade 






MAIL PREMIUM ASSER 


I 
1 

1 
1 


TV 

results 




SPONSOR: Ralston Purina AGENCY: Guild, Bascom & 

Bonfigli, S.F. 
CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: A single one-minute an- 
nouncement on WFBM-TV's Market Reports program 
brought 2,606 requests. Free mail box flags were offered 
to the 100 viewers whose letters or post cards had the 
earliest postmark. The winning mail was all postmarked 
less than two hours after the offer was made, in the 
10-rninute noontime show. The response was so great to 
the initial offer that Purina scrapped plans to make the 
same offer later in the week. Cost of the daily Market 
Reports is $94.50 per show. 
WFBM-TV, Indianapolis PROGRAM: Market Reports 


MACARONI PRODUCTS 




POUSHHUTS 


! 

SPONSOR: American Beauty AGENCY: Rogers & Smith, 
Macaroni Co. Potts-Turnbull 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Three participations per week 
on KAKE-TVs Deputy Dusty kept sales of American 
Beauty Chili-Roni from slumping during "an abnormally 
hot summer tvhich could seriously affect the sales of a 
chili and macroni packaged dinner." These are the words 
of the agency tvhich began the tv campaign for the prod- 
ucts, and they report that sales were "brisk" despite the 
adverse weather. The campaign began in February 1955 
and is credited by the agency with "the continued high 
sales . . . in the market." Cost per participation: $45. 

KAKE-TV, Wichita PROGRAM: Deputy Dusty, Participations 




SPONSOR: Krispy Krene Doughnut Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: After three weeks of tv ad- 
vertising with one-minute participations the client's two 
stores tripled their business. These results were obtained 
with tv, though other media had been explored with little 
success. A soft copy approach on the Harry Smith Show 
made people who had previously seen the shows but never 
tried the product aware of the stores. The firm also 
reports many repeat orders have been coming in as the 
campaign progresses. The total cost of each of the par- 
ticipations was $32. 

WSUN-TV, St. Petersburg PROGRAM: Harry Smith Show, 

Participations 


JEWELRY 


CANDY C©0HTER 




SPONSOR: Lippa & Co., Inc. AGENCY: Dire 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: After six months of tv usag 
one-minute live announcements at 10:30 p.m. in tl 
Thursday Late Show, the sponsor renewed his contrac 
He wrote, "Over the past years, we have used every at 
vertising medium available to acouaint the public wit 
our store and the type of merchandise we handle, Nevt 
have we had the direct response and results which we hai 
experienced since we became a WIRI sponsor." Cost t 
the six-month campaign: $747.50. 

WIRI, Plattsburg, N.Y. PROGRAM: Late Show. Announcemen 


3t 
2) 

e 
t. 
1- 
h 
'i 
e 
>/ 

!- 




SPONSOR: F. W. Woolworth Co. AGENCY: Direct 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The first attempt at tv ad- 
vertising worked out quite well for a local Woolworth 
store. Manager D. Moore bought a five-minute participa- 
tion on Tv Showcase to advertise his candy counter before 
Christmas. The segment was televised at 6:25 on 13 
December and sold out the candy counter three times 
before the holiday. Mcore reported he was "more than 
pleased with the proved results of the first tv participa- s 
tion." Cost of the five-minute segment: $16. 

CKSO-TV, Sudbury. Ont. PROGRAM: TV Showcase. 

Participation i 






; * 



which tv\radio trade magazine 
should top your list in 1956 f 



A BRIEF AND USEFUL SPONSOR ANALYSIS 



FOR BUSY STATION EXECUTIVES 







The 



I v 



At the right are 10 key points 

which will help you evaluate SPONSOR 

in your 1956 trade paper plans 



PONSOR ADVERTISING FACT SHEET 

EDITORIALLY, SPONSOR IS TOTALLY BEAMED TOWARD NATIONAL 
jvERTISERS AND AGENCIES. OUR MISSION IS TO GIVE "THE MEN 
HO FOOT THE BILLS" GUIDANCE IN THE EVALUATION AND PURCHASE 
t TV AND RADIO TIME AND PROGRAMS. 

SPONSOR'S CIRCULATION IS THE PUREST FOR YOUR PURPOSES IN THE 
'/RADIO TRADE PAPER FIELD. OF 10,000 CIRCULATION, ABOUT 
000 GO TO NATIONAL AND REGIONAL AGENCIES AND ADVERTISERS; 
650 TO ADVERTISERS, 3,300 TO AGENCIES. THAT'S 7 OUT OF 10 
-A REMARKABLY PINPOINTED CIRCULATION. 

t SPONSOR IS THE USE MAGAZINE OF THE INDUSTRY. TV BASICS, RADIO 
ICS, TV RESULTS, RADIO RESULTS, FILM BASICS, TV DICTIONARY, 
MEBUYING BASICS, TV AND RADIO STATION BUYERS' GUIDE, TIME- 
JYERS OF THE U. S., AND MANY, MANY MORE PROJECTS ARE EXAMPLES 
? SPONSOR USE VALUE. SPONSOR AVERAGES 250 INFORMATION REQUESTS 
ONTHLY FROM ADVERTISERS AND AGENCIES. 

', ALL IMPARTIAL AGENCY-AND-ADVERTISER-TRADE-PAPER-READERSHIP-STUDIES 
ADE DURING THE PAST TWO YEARS PROVE SPONSOR'S DECIDED 
EADERSHIP IN ITS FIELD (DETAILS ON REQUEST). 



|. SPONSOR AVERAGES NEARLY 20 PAID SUBSCRIPTIONS (AT ITS QUALITY PRICE 
F $8 PER YEAR) AT THE 33 TOP TIMEBUYING AGENCIES. AT JWT, 
8DO, Y&R, AND M-E SPONSOR HAS FROM 40 TO 60 PAID SUBSCRIPTIONS. 
GENCY LIBRARIANS REPORTED, IN A TRADE PAPER STUDY, THAT SPONSOR 
! KEPT ONE YEAR OR LONGER AS A REFERENCE SOURCE, THE AVERAGE 
UBLICATION SIX MONTHS OR LESS. 





about SPONSOR 






), RECENTLY, SRDS COMPLETED A STUDY OF ADVERTISING GAINS OR LOSSES 

iMONG THE TRADE PUBLICATIONS OF OUR FIELD. OF THOSE LISTED ONLY 

TWO SHOWED GAINS — SPONSOR AND SRDS. SPONSOR'S GAIN WAS OVER 250 PAGES. 

/. ALTHOUGH TRADE PAPERS ARE FREQUENTLY REGARDED AS INTANGIBLES, 
iPONSOR IS ABLE TO SHOW SPECIFIC RESULTS (FOLDER 
JF EXAMPLES ON REQUEST). 

3, SPONSOR IS A PRESTIGE PUBLICATION. YOUR PRESTIGE MESSAGE GETS 
THE ADVANTAGE OF SPONSOR'S EXCELLENT STANDING IN ITS FIELD. 



the magazine 
tv and radio 
advertisers USE 



9 



SPONSOR FIGHTS FOR WORTHWHILE INDUSTRY IMPROVEMENTS, PROJECTS, 
AND REFORMS. IT IS REGARDED AS THE FOREMOST ADVERTISING MAGAZINE 
IN THIS RESPECT. THIS HELPS PRODUCE A HEALTHY, ACTIVE 
CLIMATE FOR YOUR MESSAGE. 



10. 



t, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES LIKE SPONSOR. THEY KNOW HOW 
THOROUGHLY IT'S READ AND USED. ASK YOURS WHAT HE THINKS OF SPONSOR. 
HE'LL BE GLAD TO TELL YOU. HE KNOWS SPONSOR. 



THE INFORMATIVE BROCHURE 

"HOW MUCH SHOULD A STATION INVEST 

IN TRADE PAPER ADVERTISING" 

IS YOURS FOR THE ASKING. 



IN GEORGIA... 



you can have your cake 
and eat it, too! 

The 

GEORGIA BIG 










Buy the GEORGIA BIG 5- 
get the added sales power of 
local merchandising support! 

The vile you Mart with \our spot 
is ( lint hed by the point of sale 
merchandising support supplied 
bj each Georgia Big 5 station. In 
addition you can count on a full 
array of selling aids: trade calls 
bj station personnel who are your 
dealers' neighbors . . . trade mail- 
ings and tune-in announcements. 
Your Avery-Knodel man will give 

yOU lull details! 

CHECK these important 
FACTS ABOUT GEORGIA 

In the t*o year period ending 1954: 

n Ceorgia radio homes UP 22°o 

Georgia population UP 17% 

Ceorgia automotive sales . UP 43% 

D Ceorgia retail sales UP 13% 

i ir good reasons \sh\ Georgia 
deserves deeper penetration than 
ever before . . . deeper penetration 
than one-station coverage «..m 

all the facts about 
the big new growth ol I 



the station group that gives you all 
the practical advantages of a 
network... plus all the local 
impact of home-town programming! 

You know the intense listener loyalty that stations command locally. You 
know the strong dealer influence that stations wield locally. Now you can 
have these local advantages of five long-established stations. ..PLUS time- 
saving network economies— with the GEORGIA BIG 5! Five leading 
stations in one buy . . . involving only one bill. 

The 

GEORGIA BIG 5 

is your big Georgia buy... 
more Georgia homes 
at less cost per minute! 

The Georgia Big 5 delivers 83' ; — 
yes 839* —of all Georgia radio 
homes! More Georgia homes— at 
less cost per minute— make the 
Georgia Big 5 your big buy— your 
best buy— in the nearly $3 billion 
Georgia market. 



WGST 

Atlanta 
5.000VV ABC 



WGAC 

Augusta 
S.OOOW ABC 




WTOC 

Savannah 
S.OOOW CBS 



y*J RBL Columbus 5.00OW CBS 

AVERY-KNODEL, Inc. 



102 



National Representatives 

SPONSOR 



iry 1956 







RADIO COMPARAGRAPH OF NETW 

; D A Y I WEDNESDAY 



dfrey* 90 mln 
lUlk: Gardnr 

U 

dn 10 10:1! 
unpuna Sales 
• F-H alt das 
day Mfg: R&R 
19-30 alt daa 

- linlne 
rnatl in. ea 1 f 
10:30- 45 

■9S in." - . 
10:4V 



~ecll Brt»wn newt 

CO op 

tt m-f L 

Footnotes to Med 

History 

b-op 10:15 10:25 

Carl Warren's 

Guest Time 

10:25-10:30 



. Slngiser News 

Kraft Fdi 

S70N 10:30-35 L 

«L4VB__ _ » f 

Johaoy Oltan 
Si aw 

If tV. . 



Mary Margaret 

M. Bride 

O-Tlp Sale* 

Gumblnner 

Q-10 :t6 m A t 

N. V. Peale 
Doeskin Prods 
IXIN lu-f L 
;rey 10.05-13 

Weekday 
Mention- -Grey 

l'lullip Jones — 

Grey 

ssoe Prod— Grey 

Itandard Brands 

— TB 



My Hue >lory 
Socman Bros 
u, tli in 10:30 
Welntraub 



Vhen qii i marries 

i m-f T 

Dromedary 

tokely-VanCamp 

pat lie 

U t.tli T 



Whlsnr'g streets 
120N m-f L 
10:30-45 



■eufrey" 10-1 
Pet Mlk: Gardnr 
BBDO 
0-10:15 alt daa 
Lawli liuwu 
BAB 
Campana Sales 
iV-F-H alt das 
Jteley Mfg: R&R 
10:1 5-30 alt das 

Com I'roducts 
Miller 

tu 
FCAR 

.Minn Mining 
3BOO 
lu. U> 10:15-11 



i Cecil Brown news Mary Margaret 
co-op MeBrlde 

m-f L l Q-Tlp Sales 

■ootnotes to Med ' G " nb , ,nn A r 



H istory 



10-10:05 m.t 

n r. in 25 Co op N. V. Peale 

Doeskin Prods 

I00N m-f 1. 

Srey 10:05-15 



Carl Warren's 

Guest Time 

10 i 1 0:30 

F Slnalser news 

Kraft Fds 

m-f 10:30-35 

HL AB 

Johnny Olsta 

Show 



» 



■t 



I My true story 
I Sterling Drug 

Jn.w.f in in 30 
(see moni 



P-F-S 



Weekday 

Tar. LAT 

see mon 



»ark & Tllfonl 
Jtokely-YanCamp 

partic 
1 m-w-f T 



Whlipr'g streets 
1:30-15 



iedfrey 1011:30 
et Milk: Gardnr 
10-10:15 alt das 
Lowls Howe HAH 
seo t 

Campana Bales 
W-F-H alt das 
Jtaley Mfg: R&R 
10:1 5-30 alt das 
Kasy Wash. 
Machine 
BBD O 10:3 0-45 

Bristol-Myers 
DCSS m.w 
10:45-11 



Cosll Brawn new* 

co-op 
N m-f L 



r ootnotes to Med 

History 
0:15-10:28 Co-op 



Carl Warren's 
Guest Time 
10 25 I" 30 



Mary Marfarat 

MeBrlde 
N 10-10:05 I 

Bur-Klst 
Rho ade* A D avli 

N. V. Peale 

Doeskin Proda 

200N m-f L 

Gray 10:05-15 



Singlier news 
Kraft Fds 
m-f 10:30-35 

NLAB 

Johnny OlseD 
Shaw 






My true 
Seeman I 

I. tli 
Welntraub 



»Yhen girl m 
Stokely-Vam 

Dartlc 
H t.tli 



Weekday 
[Var. L&T 



WhUpr't s 
S25N m-f 



Ifroy i roast' a") 
rer: aeoiiWent 

avw. aMf 
Canavjriskson 
llllbury Mills 

Lb 11:15-30 
i Burnett 
a* us yr Mnd 
isatnenlal Blag 
f L 



H Engle news 

Kraft Fda 

11-11:05 

1LAB m-f 

oo-op_ 

Storytlme 

11:05-11:30 

Grove Labs 

Norwich Pharm 

3&B Quaker 

•uiulti-uiossage 



Weekday 



Magic Kingdom 



News 

Aero-Maytltmer 
B 11:30-11:35 



TEA 

11:30-13 



ward Miller 

Show 
I Wrlgley Jr 
C m-f L 

■ 



lueen for a day 
r Lerlllard: 
old gold clgs 

iWH m-f T 
aw 11:45-12 
I II aaaai 



Badfrsy (cont'd) 

Kellogg 
-'.in ii. it 

i 11-11:1 5 

Plllshury Mill* 

in in 11:15-30 

-M Burnett 

Make a^f Mnd 

tonune.7i.jl BlLg 

m-f (see monj 

Bawja 



H Engl* m»i 
Kraft Fds 
_ m-f 11-11:05 Weekday 

NL&.B |ar. L&T 

co-op 
I Storytime*• \ . 

riirwlrli Quaker Phraa* that pays 
. Florida Citrus I Colgate 
a Grove Labs m-f (g«* moo) 

B&B Esty 



Magic Kingdom 



News 
Aero Mayflower 

TB 11:30-11:3." 



TBA 

11:30-45 



Fibber McGee 

& Molly 

Miles Labs 

61N m-f T 

'-■"- 1 



Inner Circle 



— R 



Howard Miller 

Show 

Wrlgley Jr 
58C m-f L 



sady Warren 
hop. Spector 
(J-L 



Kraft 5 Star 

News 

Les Highie 

mf 12-12:05 



Weekday 
far. L&T 



Valentine 
m-f L 

Sust 



Wendy Warren 
Bishop. Spector 



Queen far a day Fibber McGee 
Lettuce Inc & Molly 

660H tu.th T Miles Labs 

Coha n ahr K m-f T 

P Lorlllard: Wad « 
sic] golds 

: m-f ism mon) 

LAN 

Kraft Star 



Inner Circle 



w 






Newt 
m-f see 



ID 



ckstage Wife 



?eie 



Trent 
North 
irmaco DC SS 
' gal Sunday 



. 



ere's Hollywood 
uaker WBT 

12:05-12:10 

S L 

Jean Shepherd 
Show 
f 12:10-12:30 
L 



Luncheon with Backstage Wife 
Frank rarr.ll j,- m . f L 

N m-f L J 

_ '_ Helen Trent 

Sunshine Boys J Pharmaco 
Gen Fds: fc css 

Minute Kice 
12:20-12:30 



(Here's Hollywd 

E uaker. Wherry, 
Baker, Tilden 
-f partic t.th 
12:05-12:10 
L 



3edfrsy (cont'd) 
l.cver : pepsodent 

m.w. all f 
McC ann-Erlc kseo 
Dow w MJA 
1'illsbury Mills 
Im-th 11:15-30 
Leo Burnett 

Make up yr Mas) 

Continental Bkg 

m-f (sm mon) 

Bate* 

"Howard Miller 

Show 
RVm Wrlgley Jr 
B58G m-f L 
RAH — "^w^— 



at Engle new* 

Kraft Fda 

11-11:05 

co-op 

LAB 

Starytlme 

m-f 11-11:05 

'multi-message 



Magic Kinc 



News 

I) 30 11 



fiueen for a day 
• P Lorlllard: 
old golds 
m-f (see mon) 
) sp 11:45 11 

LaVM 

I Pearson Pharm 
Oensshtre A Oe» 



Weekday 

IVar. LAT 



TBA 

11:30-1 



Valentin* 
m-f 

Sust 



Luneheea with 

Frank Farrell 

X m-f L 

12:15-12:25 



Weekday 
Tar. L&T 



No network 
serv4« 



lead ef Life 

Bishop 
(tor 



Cedrlt Feater 

lews co-op 

Boot m-f L 



No uelvvurk 
service 



Our tal Sunday 



'aul Harvey news 
eo -up 

m-f L 



Ka Perkins 
HO: •avdol 
N m-f L 

■•S 



Road et life 
PAG: Ivory soap 
Bishop 
pector 



no Or Malone 
Sleep -Eze 
1 m.w.f L 
i Id I n g light 
O: duz. ivory 
V m-f L 
lpton 



Mutual Music 

Box 

1:15-1:30 



Ted Maione 

co-op 

153N mi L 



Weekday 



No network 

set V lee 

m-f 



Ma 


Perkins 


P&O. onyooi 


m-f 


Isee mou) 


D-F-S 


Voung 


Dr Malone 




Tonl 


North 




23 N 


tu.th L 



■ 



Guiding light 
PoiO: dui. Ivy fl 

m-f isee mon) 
Compton 



1 Mrs Burton 



Irighter Day 
Pund's 

T 



Luncheon With 

Lopez 

1:30-2 

S* m-f I 



No network 

service 

m-f 



■ era Drake: 
rlstol-Mvers. 
)CSS: Tonl 

th 



News 
2-2:05 
Kraft 



A Letter to Lee 
Graham 
m-f T 



Weekday 
Var L&T 



Tighter day 



r 



America's 
Front Door 



Martin Block 

Show 
m-f 2:30-4 

L&T 



Jean Shepherd 
Show 
m-f 
I 12:10-12:30 

N L 

r No network 
service m-f 

C Feater news 

co-op 
Bott m-f L 



Sunshine Boys 
Gen Fds : 
Minute Eice 
12:25-12:30 



No network 
service 

m-r 



W*ndy Warren 
Bishop, Spector 
Gen. Fds. YAR 

Backstage Wife 
I Lever Bros. 
08N m.w.f L 

Helen Trent 
oni North 

pharmaco DCSS 
?8»N-L m.w.alt f 
Our gal Sunday 
jGF: Y&R. m.w 

Lever Bros. 



Kraft Star 

News 

KV m-f see m L 



VaUntlr 
m-f 
Sust 



. Here's Hollywd 
IN m-w see m L 



Jean Shepherd 

Show 

12:10-12:30 

N L 



Weekday 
\Vu. LAT 



Luneheea • 
Frank Fas 
N m-f 

12:13-12: 

Sunshine E 

Gen Fdi 

Minute K 

12:25-12: 



No network 
service m-f 



2nd Mrs Burto" 

Pharmaco 
m-f (see mon) 
DCSS 



Luneheon Witl 

Lopez 

1:30-2 

N m-f L 



Brighter Day 
Ponds 
JWT 



Nora Drake 
Toni Co. North 



Aunt Jenny 
Lever 
FCB 



A 


Letter 


to 


Lee 




Grah 


im 




iN 


in- 


f 


T 



Mutual Music 

Box 

1:15 1:30 



News 
Kraft 
Kraft 
2-2:05 



America's 

Front Deor 

2:30-3 

tf Bf £ 



+ 



No natwi 
s*rvlc* 



Paul Harvey news 
co-op 
m-r l 



Read af life 

Bishop 

Spector 



C Feater ntws 

co-op 

Boat m-f L 



Paul Harvay 
co-op 
O m-f 



Ted Malone 



Weekday 
I'ar. L&T 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Ma 


Perkins 


, PAG 


: orydtti 


m-f (see mon) 


D-F-8 




Yeuna 


Dr Malone 


)' mil - 


JWT 


18K 


m.w.f L 



< t Mutual Music 
Box 

i -i s i .'»n 



Weekday 
Var. L&T 



Ted Mali 

co-op 

153N m-f 



Guiding light 
S-&G: dua. IVy fl 
1 m-f (see mnn) 
C em a tao.^B.^Ba 



No network 

service 

m-f 



2nd Mrs Burton 
Lever Bros. 



Weekday 
Var. L&T 



Brighter Day 
Pond's JWT 



Martin Block 

Shew 

m-f 2:30 4 

N LAT 



Nora Drake 
Tonl Co 
m-f (tee mon) 
North 



No netw 
service 
m-f 



Luncheon With 
Loi 



.opez 



X 



m-f 
News 
2-2:05 



No netw 
serrlo) 
m-f 



Brighter day 
see mon 



A Letter To 

Lee Graham 

I m-f T 



America's 

Front Doer 

2:30 3 



Pearson Pharm 
Donahue A Coe 



Martin B 

Shew 

in f 2:31 



louse party 
>ver: surf 
H 3-3:15 1 
DO m-w.f 



lsburv: flour 
3:15-30 T 
m-th 



Mutual Reports 

the News 

3-3:05 

m-f 



Weekday 



House party 
Campana 
W F H 

194H tu.th L 
m-th 3:15-30 seg 
LB (see mon) 



Mutual Reports 

the News 

3-3:05 

m-f 



Weekday 
Var. L&T 



ed Rohbins' 
)isk Derby 
B m-f L 



Ruby Mercer 

Show 

m-r 

J 3-4 T&L 



Hotel for Pets 

"I Puss'n Boots L 

Lynn Baker 

The Dnetor's 

Wife 

Ti 



Martin Block Fred Bobbins' 
(cont'd) Disk Derby 

N m-f L&T 206N m-f L 

5-min seg 



Brown & Wmsn 

Bates 

t 8:30-9:15 

5 mtn segs 



Hotel for Pets 

L 



Ruby Meroer 

Show Ju , t pf a | n B ||| 

3 ; 4 mt, I * I1Ie ' i-*ot 
TAL | m -r (see mon) 



House Party 
! Lever: surf 
to.w.th Isee mon) 
BB DO 

Plllshurv Mtlln 
B-th 3:15-30 seg 

(see mon) 
L Burnett 



Mutual Reports 

the News 

3-3:05 



IMlli 
m-f ( 
fade, 
it te 



Martin Block 

(cont'd) 

N m-f LAT 



Fred Robblns' 

Disk Derby 

!06N m-f L 

see mon 



Weekday 
Var. L&T 



Ruby Mercer 

Show 

3:05-4 

N m-f T&L 



Hotel for Pets 

N U 



Martin B 

(cont'd 
N m-f 



Just Plain Bill 

Miles Labs 
m-f (see mon) 
Wade 



lalen Drake 

Show 
er Heme Prod 
Y&R 

• network 

service 

a f 



Mutual Reports 

the News 

4-4:05 

m-f 



It to Haoplness 
.t-O: ilreft.tidet 
B8N m-f L 
F-S 



Mutual Reports 

the News 

4-4:05 

m-f 



Bruce & Dan 

4:05-4:30 



Stella DnMa< 
<5Urline Tf»a* 
T1V m.w.f L 
F-S 



Manhattan 
Matinee 
m-r L 



Mutual Matinee 

■ i th Bruce & Dan 

4:05-4:30 



t te happiness 
PAG: dreft. Duet 

m-f (see mon) 
D-F-S 



U.S. Military 
Band 

4:30-5 



WMrtcr Prnwn 
Sterling Dmc* 
T4N m.w.f I 
D-F-S 



sews 4:55-5 .. 
m-f L 



Pepper Young 

P&O 
«N m-f L 



Treasury 
Bandstand 

LAT 



No Network 
Programing 



Bandstand U.S.A. 
4:30-5 



Stella 


Dallas 


| Sterling 


Drug 


kn.w.f (see mom 


O-F-S 




Wldder 


Brown 


Tonl 


Co. 


I174N tu.th L 


Burnett 





Manhattan 

Matinee 

N m-f L 



Mutual Reports 
the News 

1-4 IT, 

m-r 



Rt t* happiness 
P&G : dreft. tide! 
m-r (see mon) 
D-F-S 



Mutual Matinee 

itti Bruce & Dan 

1:05-4:30 



Stella Dallas 
Sterling Drug 
m.w.f (see mon) 
D-F-S 



Manhatti 

M.ltlnf 
N m-f 



No Network 

Programinc 



Pepper Young 
P&G 

m-r (see mon) 



Treasury 
Bandstand 

L&T 



Richard Hayes 
Show 



Wldder Brown 
Sterling Drug 

m.w.f 
D-F-S 



Peppi-r Young 

PAO: ramay. duzt 

m-f (see mon) 



Treatur 
Bandstar 



Stand By With 

Bob & Ray 

5-5:45 m-f 

N- T&L 



Woman in House 
Miles I.abs 
K3H m-r L 
Wade 



Musical Express 
N m-f T 

Sust 



Stand By With 

Bob & Ray 

5-5:45 

N m-r T&L 



No network 

service 

m-r 



I es Paul & 

Mary Ford 
Warner Lambert 

Lambert & 
N Feasley T 
Gen. Ssperts Tlnte l,., n<tn ^„ 
Wen. Tire 5:50-55| Gen Mills 

lE^y ReynoIds r Amer ***<^ 



Presenting 

Claude Rains 

186N m-r L 



Rex Koury 
T m-r T 

Sust 



Gloria Parker 

V r*-f L 

Sust 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Les Paul & 

Mary Ford 

Warner Lambert 

Lambert A 
N Feasley T 
Gen Snorts Time 
Gen. Tire & Bub 
N m-f 5:50-55 L 
D'Arey 
Reynolds Esty 



Woman in House 
Miles Labs 
_m-f (see mon) 
Wade 



Musical Express 
N m-r T 

Sust 



Stand By with 

Bob & Ray 

5-5:45 

k\ T&L 



Lorenzo Jones 

Colgate 
m-r (see mon) 
Etty 



Bobby Hammack 
A His What Four 
ajBT m-w-tb-r Tl 



Lone Ranger 
Gen Mills 
D-F-S 

Amer Bakeries 
41N m-r L 
Tucker Wayne 



" 



Gloria Parker 
m-f L 

Sust 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Les Paul &. 
Mary Ford 
Warner Lambert 
Lambert & 
_Feasley T E 
Gen Sports Time 
Gen Tire & Rut 
IN m-r 5:50-55 L •> 
D'Arey 



Woman in House M 

Mile- 

m .f ispp mon) 



usleal E 
m-r 
Sust 



LSTtittu Juno* 
Colgate 
r Isee mon) 
sty 



Bobby Har 
His Wha- 

m-"-th 



Cnil Brawn a*w* 
HLAB 



Lone Ranger 

Gen Mills 
i-F-S 

Amer Bakeries 
Tuck er Way ne 

■■■ 



Gloria P; 
c m-r 



Vincent 1 

Sj-t 



OGRAMS 



- 



Daytime 23 January 1956 



HURSDAY 



ttery 

!ros 
10:30 



arrles 
2amp 
ry 



treets 
L 



dom 



Godfrey" 10-11:30 

HarU 
m.t.th & f 
Pet Mlk: Gardnr Footnotes to Med 



N 



10-1 0:15 «lt das 

Campana Sales 
W-F-H 10:15-30 
Staley Mfg: R&R 
10:15-30 alt dai 



American 

y&r 

FC&B 



Homes 



Cecil Brown m » 
co-op 
m-f 



L N 



H istory 
10:15-25 Co-op 



Kellogg Co 

tu.th 10:45-11 

Lee Burnett 



Carl Warren's 

Guest Time 

10:2 5-1 0:30 

F. Slnglser newt 

Kraft Fds 

m-f 10:30-35 

NL &B 

Johnny Olsen 

10:35-11 

N T II 



Godfrey (cont'd) 

Kellogg 
McM.J&A th 



wer piuabury Mlllf 

£2 Ini-th 11:15-30 

Lee Burnett 



Make up yr Mud 

* Continental Bkg 

|m-f (aee mon) 

Bates 

Howard Miller 
cle Show 

IWm Wrlgley Jr 
fc m-f L 

R&rT 

t 

L Wendy Warren 
■Bishop, Specter 

;nir ICoraPrd: Miller 

rtM Of. tu. th Y &R 

L Backstage Wife 

25 fJ m-f L 

toys i 



ice 
30 



Mutual Morning" 
H Engle newt 

Kraft Fds 
m-f 11-11:05 

NL&B 

Storytime 

11:05-11:30 

multi-mess age 

Queen for • day 

Lettuce lnc 
( tu.th (see tu) 
John Cohan 

P. Lorlllard 

old golds 

j m-f (see moo) 

LAN .^ mmmm _ 



W 



Kraft Star 
News 
12-1:205 
m-f J- 



Helen Trent 
piiarmaco DCSS 

Our gal Sunday 
I Lever Bros. 
Murray 



Quaker Oats 

Wherry. Baker, 

Tilden 

Storytime 

Here's Hllywd 

n-f 12:05-12:10 



I Road of life 
L Bishop 
Spector 



Jean Shepherd 

Show 
p-f 12:10-12:30 

No network 
Berrloe m-f 



F R I D A 



Mary Margaret 
McBride 
10-10:05 I 

Gen fds Y&R 

N. V. Peale 
Doeskin Prods 
200N m-f L 
Grey 10:05-15 



Weekday 
Var. L&T 



When a Girl 

Marries 

Park & Tilford 

Stokely VanCamp 

partic 

|H m-f T 



ui- 



Var. 



Weekday 



L&T 



My true story 

Sterling Drue 

ll,w,f 10-10:30 

(see mon) 

D-F-S 



Godfrey 10-11:80 
Pet Mlk: Gardnr Cecil Brown 
10-10:15 alt f 
Hartz 

m.t.th.f 

Lewis Howe 

ev ery 4th f 
Brs-Myrs: DCSS 
Glamorene: H&G 
10:15-30 ev 4th f 
Corn Prd: Miller 
Minn Mining 

Dow Ohem 
10:30-45 ev 4th f 



Whlspr'g streets 



mm-in 



AEST 
A, E. 



Magic Kingdom 



News 
Aero-Mayflower 
11:30-11:35 
TB 



TBA 

11:30-45 



Inner Circle 



Weekday 



C Foster news 

co-op 

Boat m-f L 



Ma Perkins 
Li P&G: oxydol 
— I m-f (see mon) 

Jd-f-s 



Young Or Malone 

Toni 

|23N tu.th L 



Guiding light 
jPA-G: dii7.. Ivy fl 
m-f (see mon) 
Compten 

;2nd Mrs Burton 

Pharmaco 
DCSS 
m-f (see mon) 



)-4 

L&T 



Mutual Music 

Box 

1:15-1:30 



Luncheon with 
Lopez 
1:30-2 



Brighter Day 
Pond's 
JWT 



News 
Kraft 
2-2:05 



Nora Drake 

Toni 
North 



A Letter to Lee 

Graham 

IN m-f 1 



Weekday 



Weekday 



Aunt Jenny 
Lever 



' 



America's 

Front Door 

N 2:30-3 T 



Valentine 
m-f 

SuSt 



Luncheon with 

Frank Farrell 

JN m-t L 

_J2:15-12:25 

"Sunshine Boys 

Gen Fds: 

Minute Kice 

12:25-12:30 




SATURD 



Footnotes to Med 

H istory 
10:15-25 Co-op 



alt f 

Staley 



Godfrey (cont'd) 

L*ver McE 

Campana 

Sellogg Burnett 

alt f 



Carl Warren's 
Guest Time 
10:25-10:30 



Mary Margaret No school touay Allan Jackson 
McBride Srable Prods Co I Chevrolet Dlrs 

10-10.05 L beverly pnut otr 195N 10-10:05 L 

en Fds Y&R B4Clnc L C-E 

N. V. Peale *°«I e r r ' ° letBrlch c Galen Drake 

Doeskin Prods & Brow " 
:00N m-f L | 
rey 10:05-15 



Johnny Olsen 

Show 

N m-f L 



Make up yr Mnd 

Continental Bkg 
m-f (see mon) 
Bates 



Howard Miller 

Show 

TVm Wrigley Jr 

1580 m-f L 



Wendy Warren 
31shop, Spector 
DornPrd: Miller 
Ben Fds, Y&R 



Backstage Wile 

Lever Bros. 

I 8N m.w.f L 

Helen Trent 

oni North 

'harmaco DCSS 



Vlutoaf Morning" 
H Engle news 
Kraft Fds 
I m-f 11:25-30 

NL&B 

Storytime 
JFlorida Citrus 
| Grove Labs 

Norwich 
I 11:05-11:30 
B&B 

|**multl- messa ge 
fcueen for a day 

Sleep -Eze 
fccot t 11:3 0-45 
I P Lorlllard 
I m-f (see mon) 
so 11:40-11 
L&N 

Kraft Star 

News 

A\ see m L 

Here's Hllywd 

n-f 12:05-12:10 



. I General Fds 
lY&R 10:05-10 




-Breakfast Club 

Review 

Ball Bros 

Cli T 

Applegate 



Galen Drake 
Father John's 

Medicine 

■I. W. Stevens 

10:45-55 seg 

K L 

Allan Jackson 

Sleep-Eze 
Stbbn's 10:55-11 



Moppets & 
Melodies 

T 

Sust 



Weekday 
r ar. L&T 



No network 
service 



'Our gal Sunday 
J Whltenall Puar 

m-f 
Murray -aoH 



Paul Harvey news 

(U-OP 

m-f (see uiuii) 



Ted Malone 
co-op 
153N m-f 



U (JClViUIR 

service 
m-f 



Road of life 

Bishop 
Spector 



Ma Perkins 
P&G: uxydil 
m-f (see mon) 
D-F-S 



Young Dr Malons 

Pond's 
JWT 



Guiding light 
P&G: duz. Ivy ti 
t (see muui 



npton 

No network -„.. _„ „ 

service 2n * Mrs. Burton 

m . Lever Bros. 

Bishop Spector 



Martin Block 

Show 

m-f 2:30-4 

N L&f 



Brighter Day 
Pond's 
JWT 



Nora Drake 

Toni 
North 



Brlohter day 

Lever 



Weekday 

';u. L&T 



No network 
service m-f 



C Foster news 

co-op 

Bust m-f 1 



Mutual Music 

Box 

115-1:30 



■t— »" 



Luncheon with 
Lopez 

1:30-2 
1 m-f L 



Kraft 

News 



2-2:05 



Letter to Lee 
Graham 

N m-f T 

America's 

Front Door 

N 2:30-3 T 



It's Time 

pT 11:30-11:35 L 

All-league 
•lubhouse 

T 



How to Fix It 

12:05-10 

IV L 

Sust 

01 Ranch Boys 

^master, 
l'o L 



Good News 

10:30-10:45 

Sust 



Monitor 

Var L 

am Sat thru 

12 midn Sun 

See Sun 



Conference 
N 



Call 
L 



News 
11-11:05 



The Lucky 

Pierre Show 

N L 



Rob t Q Le wis 
i Milner Prods 
Best 11:55-12 

89N L 

V. hr 



Phonorama 

Time 

Phllco Corp 

11:30-55 

685N L 

Hute hliw 

Musical Wheel 

of Chance 

11:30-11:55 

Sust 



Allan Jackson 
Chevrolet Dlrs 
95N 12-12:05 L 
>-E 



It's Time 
S 12:30-12:35 L 

Sust 

American farmer «.,__j,. 

C.We.h L JAa Sm m 

203H T 

CAW 



li e !£l2n 



Monitor 



Teenagers U.S.A. 

12n-l 

Sust 



National farm 4 

home hour 
I Allls-Chalmers: 

farm equipment 
J»eC.Wash L 

seg of Monitor 

Glttlne 



Navy hour 
Wash 



I Allan Jackson 
Chevrolet 
Campbell-Ewald 
1-1:05 



, City Hospital 



Weekday 
Var. L& 



T 



Shake the 

Maracas 

If T 

Sust 



Kathy Godfrey 
Show 
Sust 



News 

2-2:05 



Var. 



Weekday 



Festival 

(with Milton 

Cross) 

2-4 

L&T 

It's Time 

N 2:30-2:35 L 



Adventures 
in Sound 
2:05-2:15 



String Serenade 

2:15-2:30 



Dance Orch 



Fifth Army 
Band 



Monitor 



Magic of Music 

1-1:30 
Sust 



Symphonies | 
Youth 
1:30-2:30 
Am i 



Var 



Fifth Army 
Band 
2:30-3 

Sust 



Monitor 
Var L 



Monitor 



L&1 



House party 

Sunsweet Co ■ 
Long tu.thl 

195 H 3-3:15 T.I 
L Burnett tu.thj 
m-th 3:15-30 seg{ 

(see mon) 
L Burnett 



Mutual Reports 

the News 

3-3:05 



Fred Robblns' 



No Network 
Programing 



id 
L&T 



imack 

Four 
-f T 



No network 

service 

m-f 



.opez 



Ruby Mercer 
Show 

3:05-4 
f m-f T&L 



Hotel for Pets 

N L 



nartlr 8">c> 
(coot d) 
m-r la 1 



House party 
Lever: surf 

m.w.f (see mom 

BBUO 



Mutual Reports 
the News 

3-3:05 



Weekday 

Var. L&T 



s-so- 



News 
3-3:05 



Hawaiian 

Pineapple 

180H dole T 

Ayer f oni 



Mutual Reports 

the News 

4-4:05 

m-f 



Mutual Matinee 
nth Bruce & Dan 

4:05-4:30 



Dick & Diane 

4:30-5 



Stella Da'ias 
Sterling l)rm> 
m.w.f (see mon) 
D-F-S 


WIHnVr Brown 

Toni Co. 

tu, th 

Burnett 



S'and By with 

Bob & Ray 

5-5:45 

N^ T&L 

I es Paul & 

M ary F or* 

Warner Lambert 

Lambert & 
N Feasley 1 



Gen Sports Tim 
<!en Tire & But 
\' m-f 5:50-55 1 
D'Arcy Reynold: 



Just Plain Bill 

Miles Labs 
m-f (see mon) ? 
Wade ^m^ 

Rt to happiness 
P&0:rireft tide 
m-f (see moni 
D-F-S 



N 



Fred Robbins' 

Disk Derby 

20bN m-f L 



Pp(in»T Youno 

P&O: eamay. rtu^t 
m-f (see mon) 



Woman In House 

Miles Labs 
m-f (see mon) 
Wade 



Lorenzo 


Jones 


Colgate 


m-f (see 


mon) 


Esty 





eell Br 

: Kraft 



Lone Ranger 
Gen Mills 
D-F-S 

Amer Bakeries 
s newt Tuc ker W ayne 
NL&B Daniel Boon* 



Mutual Matinee Rt to happiness 
with Bruee & Dan P&G: dreft. tide 



Manhattan 
Matinee 
m-f L 



No Network 
Programing 



Treasury 
Bandstand 

L&T 



Musical Express 

N m-f T 

Sust 



Bobby Hammack 
& His What Four 
H m-w-th-f T 



Gloria Parker 
N m-f 

Sust 
Vincent Lonez 



No network 

service 

m-f 



Ruby Mercer 
Show 

3:05-4 
m-f T&L 



Richard Hayes 
Army Show 



Hotel 

N 



for 



Pets 
L 



Just Plain Bill 

Allies Labs 

m-f (see mon) 

Wade «hhs 



Festival 

(cont'd) 

1-4 



Treasury Show 



County Jamboree 

3-3:30 

Sust 



Sports Parade 

3:30-4 

Sust 



Salute to the 
Nation 

4:30-5 



Stand By with 

Bob & Ray 

5-5:45 



m-f (se< 
D-F-S 


mon) 


Stella Dallas 
Sterling Drug 
frn.w.f (see mon) 
{D-F-S 


Wldder 
■ sterling 
m.w 
D-F-S 


Brown 
Drug 
.f 



K 



Band Concert 
Promenade 



It's Time 

4:30-4:35 



News 
4-4:05 



Pepper Young 
.v<J camay, duzt 
ui f (see mon) 



Les Paul & 
Mary Ford 

Warner Lamtjert 
Lambert & 

N Feasley T 



The World 
Tourist 



Richard Hayes 
Army Show 



Make Way for 
Youth 



Woman in House 

Miles Labs 
-f (see mon) 
Wade 



Lorenzo Jones 

Colgate 
m-f (see mon) 



Gen Sports Time: 

Gen Tire & Rub IJW 

N m-f 5:50-55 L, Lone Ranger 

Reynolds Esty Gen Mills 

D'Arcy D-F-S 



Dinner at the 

Green Room 
(Henry Jerome) 
N h 



News 
5-5:05 



Dance Orch 



Bandstand USA 
4-5 
Sust 



Stand by Sports 
5-5:55 



Saturday 



Amer Bakeries 
NL&B Tuc ker Wayn e 
B:ia-« Daniel Boone 



Cecil Brown news 

Kraft: 
m-f 



Les Paul & 
Mary Ford 

5:55-6 

John Flynn 
News 



Hanltui 



Monitor 




WCPO 

CINCINNATI 

and 

WNOX 

KNOXVILLE 
announce the appointment of 



JOHN 
BLAIR 

£ COMPANY 




as national representative 
effective January 1, 1956 for WCPO 
effective March 1, 1956 for WNOX 




WCPO 

Mutual Network 

250 w. at 1230 Ice. 

CINCINNATI 6, OHIO 




WNOX 

CBS Radio Network 

10,000 w. at 990 kc. 

KNOXVILLE 17, TENN. 



SCRIPPS-HOWARD RADIO, INC. 



23 JANUARY 1956 




a forum on questions of current interest 
to air advertisers and their agencies 



What would you advise radio and television sponsors 
whose products you sell in your store 



ASKED 

OF RETAIL 

(rROCERS 



OFFER A FA'R PROFIT MARGIN 

• Whether you like or dislike ad- 
vertising all depends on the margin 
of profit that a national advertiser al- 
lows. I was a grocery salesman for 
twenty years; so I know the feelings 
on both sides of the fence. 

You see, we have an overhead we 
have to meet. When certain goods 
like soap flakes offer a 4 or 5% profit 
margin, it's impossible to maintain 
that overhead. 

But if we're allowed 15% or over 
on a nationally advertised product, 
it's a good product for us to carry 
and we're happy to have the producer 
behind us. 

A while ago, Borden's ran a two- 
for-one instant coffee sale, which al- 
lowed us 22% profit. They backed 
it with a lot of radio and tv adver- 
tising. We would have been glad to 
see them keep it up because in two 
months we sold 75 cases. Now, with- 
out the campaign, we're lucky if we 
sell a case a month. 

Of course, there are products that 
you think will do well when they're 
introduced on radio or tv; you stock 
up on them. But somehow people just 
don't buy them, and you're left with 
the stock. I'm thinking now of Fluffo 
and Miracle Cloth. 

We get enough notice on coming 
campaigns; we have plenty of time to 
stock up; but I think that both the 
independent store-keeper and the su- 
permarket are more willing to co- 
operate on promoting nationally ad- 
vertised products if a fair margin of 
profit is offered and continues to be 
offered. 

Mickey Edelman, owner 

Associated Food Store 

Jackson Heights, N.Y. 

SERVICE PREMIUM OFFERS 

• I'd like to give three suggestions 
to the industry. Although a mer- 



chandising consultant now, I was a 
grocery man for nrny years and I 
want to give this advice as such. 

First, I think the retailer deserves 
consideration from the national adver- 
tiser on two-for-one or penny sales. 
This consideration should be in the 
form of sufficient notice for the re- 
tailer to clear out his present stock 
before the campaign begins. The re- 
tailer feels that he merits more profit 
because twice the handling and shelf 
space are now necessary. This point 
should also be considered. 

Secondly, there is the matter of of- 
fers whereby the retailer must keep 
coupons handy for customers entering 
national contests and the like. I'd 
suggest that the sponsor make ade- 
quate service arrangements so that 
coupon pads may be replenished. 
Should they be depleted, both retailer 
and customer become antagonized. 

Lastly, a local advertiser will get 
more effect from his advertising with 
less time and space than a national 
advertiser because local people will 
come to look and listen for his mes- 
sage. This effect added to the nation- 



al effort would move sales all the 
more. Perhaps this seems like advice 
to the grocers; but it may be a pro- 
motional idea for sponsors. 

Stanford Cohen 

The Stanford Co. 

Long Meadow, Mass. 

LET VS KNOW ABOUT CAMPAIGNS 

© Our main concern at the point of 
sale is making things easier for the 
customer. I feel that those gimmicks 
used by national radio and television 
advertisers impede a great deal of the 
progress we have made in that direc- 
tion. 

We usually feel the impact of com- 
mercials on goods where gimmicks 
have been used. For instance, a wo- 
man may come into a store to buy 
X cereal so that her little Joey can 
tear off the box-top and send it back 
to the company. The whole family 
has to go through a lot of bother for 
whatever Joey will get from the com- 
pany. Chances are that the woman 
won't buy X cereal again until the 
company offers another premium. 




ADVERTISING CRITICISM FROM THE MEN WHO SELL 

• SPONSOR wanted to know how the man behind the counter feels 
about campaigns built to move goods off his shelves. So four grocers 
were asked for answers to the question above. Their feelings are 
not as much in agreement as we would have liked, but in daily contact 
with the consumer, they give thought provoking advice to advertisers 



110 



SPONSOR 



So, X company has made a lot of 
noise, has made things difficult for 
Joey, and has caused the woman to 
question shopping ease and conve- 
nience at the store that carries X 
cereal. 

I can't tell very much how goods 
move as a result of commercials be- 
cause I'm left in the dark about when 
they go on radio or tv. It seems to 
me that if they're going to put so 
much dough into advertising, they 
might let the people who sell their 
goods know about their plans. But 
our advertising department might 
know even if we sales people never 
hear from them. 

That's my main criticism ... I just 
don't think that using those compli- 
cated gimmicks is the proper way to 
sell. But, as I said, the gimmicks are 
about the only way we come in con- 
tact with radio and tv advertising. 

Sales Manager 

Supermarket chain 

New York and New Jersey 

CARTOONS AND JINGLES SELL 

• First and most important, televi- 
sion is a forceful medium which has 
the potential to sell countless quanti- 
ties of goods. But the corny canned 
commercial detracts from its possi- 
bilities. 

Now, I think that if I had the bud- 
get, I'd advertise with those cute jin- 
gles and cartoons. That's the kind of 
thing that makes people want to stay 
through a commercial and buy. When 
/ see them I'm so convinced that I'd 
almost like to buy products I'd never 
dreamed of having. 

Going along with this, I feel that 
advertisers would be better off with 
cartoons and jingles than with high- 
pressure premium offers — so would 
retailers. 

From our point of view, premium 
offers present a stock problem. When 
premiums come out, it's necessary for 
us to set aside non-premium items on 
hand, letting them bide their time un- 
til the offer is over. 

In addition, we consider cash most 
valuable in exchange; but these offers 
reduce actual cash intake. 

So I'd say that sponsors would be 
doing their retailers and their audi- 
ences a favor if they got away from 
hard-punching commercials. 

Abe Dilbert, v. p. 

Dilbert Supermarket 

New York City 



gJIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!lllllllll|!lllll!llllllll!llllllllllllll!ll|ll!llll!lll||||H||||||||||||||||m| 



v° 



c ^ oN "» *h t 







1 



if r _^ Ve^ciaHtv 
is your TARGET- 
aim FOR ^**lL*>/% WITH 




rV© 



John E. Pearson Co., National Representatives 



GREATER CLEVELAND'S NUMBER 1 STATION 



MORE THAN EVER 

Stocfafott'a 7ft*4t *£i4te*ted to Station 
HOOPER RADIO AUDIENCE INDEX 

STOCKTON, CALIF. OCTOBER THRU DECEMBER, 1955 



MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
7:00 A.M. -12:00 NOON 


RADIO 

SETS 

IN USE 


C 


N 


KSTN 


A 


M 


OTHER 
AM & FM 


SAMPLE 
SIZE 


15.7 


2^.9 


6.V 


37.6 


1^.9 


9.3 


7.0 


9,933 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 
12:00 N00N-6:00 P.M. 


RADIO 
SETS 
IN USE 


c . 


Sv. 


KSTN 


A 


M 


OTHER 
AM & FM 


SAMPLE 
SIZE 


12. :y 


'l.l 


8.2 


34.1 


lW.l 


8.7 


7.2 


11,892 




Fall 1955 Hooperatings show 
KSTN increases dominance of 
*Stockton Radio Audience. 

*America's 92nd Market 



7/fccdcc • Ttecte • 'PenAOH€Uitie& 

Represented by Hollingbery 



23 JANUARY 1956 



111 



POINTER 
FOR 1956 




OVER 1,000,000 

LISTENERS WILL 

LISTEN TO 

WLOL 



That's a lot of consumers— 

but their reason for listening is 

just one. They know that 

WLOL gives Twin City Listeners 

the best in Music, News and 

Sports— 24 hours a day. 

Yes, the "1330 Habit" is really 

goin' strong right around the 

clock. In Minneapolis & St. Paul 

WLOL is the top-rated 

independent station, leading all 

other independents and three 

out of four networks. 

THE TOPPER IN 
INDEPENDENT RADIO 

MINNEAPOLIS -ST. PAUL 

5000 watts — 1330 on your dial 

LARRY BENTSON. Pres. 

Wayne "Red" Williams, Mgr. 

Joe Floyd, Vice-Pres. 

AM RADIO SALES 




Continued 

front 

page 11 



(freshness!), size of audience, timeliness (or lack of it) all 
affect the wearability of a given property. What holds for one 
may have no bearing on another. 

Oddly enough the initial success of a program can have a 
direct bearing on how long it will last. If it came in like a 
lion (as against a slow build) it may well go out like a jet- 
propelled lamb. Success tends to sow the seeds of its own 
destruction. Every novel twist, every gimmick, every catch 
phrase or device that wows 'em today and hence gets repeated 
by the teen agers and bandied about, suddenly is turned 
against. It becomes corny. Now only creeps and squares 
are found using it. Those devices which were spontaneously 
acceptable now appear forced and phoney and distasteful. 

What causes this turnabout? Well, in the first place, peo- 
ple are fickle. They seek out the familiar at first, feel more 
comfortable in familiar surroundings. When a person comes 
to from a faint his first question is not, "What happened?" 
but "Where am I?" However, once the audience gets to 
count on its familiar friends, then it starts to take them for 
granted and next comes the disenchantment. The big reason 
for television's dramatic way of losing appeal is that tv itself 
is a sensation. Nothing is done mildly via tv. Stars row with 
their cast, cobblers win big money, Como takes Gleason, and 
even competitive advertising media see fit to reserve page one 
for the story. So naturally when the ruling powers fall, 
they plummet. 

What to do about it? Well, Jack Webb is adding a love 
interest. Burns and Allen have a son in the plot. Phil Silvers, 
I hear tell, has also discovered girls. A new note is certainly 
smart. A new focal point. A fresh slant can come from new 
writers. New characters can be developed or concentrated 
upon if they were there (dormant) all along. Anything to 
bring back an element of the unexpected. Don't let 'em take 
you for granted. 

Look closely at your gimmicks. Are they starting to annoy 
people? Redo your musical bridges. Pep up that main title. 
Lead in to that middle break with something different. Get 
a new stooge with a new funny line. 

Same things go for your commercials. Revise 'em. Insert 
a few feet of animation. Change your announcer. You know 
the same gent swallowing the same pill and walking over to 
the blackboard where he takes you on a trip through the 
esophagus can get kind of boring even if your head does ache. 
That boredom causes a prospective customer to question what- 
ever the commercial says. Disbelief sets in. Not a good thing 
for a sales climate. 

And one more thought. Consider those summer reruns 
seriously. Maybe the audience would like a little relief dur- 
ing the eight hottest weeks. Maybe it would welcome you 
back just that much more fondly in the fall. 



• • • 



112 



SPONSOR 



I 



IN LOUISVILLE, WAVE RADIO IS 

ycwtp r%zce4 and ^oma Tfotafi/ 




DIAL 970 



WAVE'S Dynamic New Radio Service 
For A Dynamic New Louisville! 

WAVE's own exciting version of Monitor and Weekday — a co- 
ordinated group of programs that's heard nine sparkling hours 
daily. Hours filled with music, news, weather, sports, traffic reports, 
interviews and household tips. Hours skillfully blended with 
Monitor and Weekday to provide good fun, good company, good 
listening — from dawn till midnight! 






IVIONI1 

The NBC Weekend Radio Service! 




NBC Radio's versatile, weekend-long listening post that goes any- 
where and everywhere for news, interviews, music, sports and 
entertainment. 

•r a 

W III t*m. IJP#% lr 

NBC's New Radio Companion! 

NBC Radio's new Weekday follow-up to Monitor — a fascinating 
flow of entertainment, service and news features ... a personal, 
daily companion to the nation's housewives. 

^Special Pulse Study in September, 1955 credited MONITOR (and 
WAVE) with the largest audience of the entire weekend in Louisville. 



WAVE 



LOUISVILLE 

5000 WATTS • NBC AFFILIATE 



SPOT SAI,F,S 

Exclusive National Representatives 





THOMAS 
VISCARDI 
Time Buyer 
Kenyon & 
Eckhardt 



tij 



"Carefully examining the 
Southern New England 
television market, I came 
across an important fact 
indicating WNHC-TV's 
dominance in the market. 
91* daily and weekly 
newspapers and magazines 
publish the Station's pro- 
gram listings in Connecticut, 
Long Island, and Massachu- 
setts. This represents a 
readership of 2,492,000 
New Englanders. It's ob- 
vious, a newspaper will 
only publish a station's 
programs when it is satis- 
fied there is sufficient 
reader interest and station 
penetration." 

•Names of publications and ABC 
figures on request. 



COVERS CONNECTICUT COMPLETEIY 

316.000 WATTS MAXIMUM POWER 

Pop. Served 3,564,150 • TV Homes 948,702 




Channel 8 • Television 




agency profile 



Dr. Wallace H. Wulfeck 

Chairman of the Executive Committee 
Wm. Esty Co., New York 



"Motivational research has had few applications in radio and tv 
to date," Dr. Wulfeck, Wm. Esty Co.'s chairman of the Executive 
Committee, told sponsor. 

"However, it's one form of research which could probably shed 
light on a number of problems. Last night, for example, a man 
complained to me that he's a creature of habit and that the amount 
of programing reshuffling on the tv networks upsets him. This is 
an area the networks might do well to explore." 

In his capacity at the agency, Dr. Wulfeck actually concerns him- 
self with agency organization and management problems, but adds 
that his interest in research continues. It's an interest, incidentally, 
which may well be hereditary in the Wulfeck family: Dr. Wulfeck's 
son is a professor of psychology at Tufts College. 

"It's obvious that agencies can use motivational research to 
evaluate commercial effectiveness," Dr. Wulfeck went on to explain. 
"But it would be 'after-the-fact' research, once the commercials 
are finished, and could only be a guide for the future." 

He feels, too, that while this science has already been applied 
successfully to product development, it's grossly overlooked by such 
potential beneficiaries as the radio networks. 

"Agencies and clients would be interested in knowing such things 
as tuning habits while driving, degree of distraction in traffic and 
other elements affecting listening factors." 

Dr. Wulfeck added, "Research during the past five years about 
learning during sleep points to another field radio might exploit." 

Trained as a psychopathologist with a Ph.D. from Yale, Dr. 
Wulfeck tends to use professional jargon. As he puts the case for 
radio advertising: 

"As new experience occurs in the brain, nerves are myelenized 
(impacted). When experience is repeated, myelenization increases, 
and the nerve pathways are reinforced. Radio commercials appeal 
to one sense mode (hearing). When you increase the number of 
sense modes, you intensify impression, as in the case of hearing and 
seeing tv. But radio is non-directional, in that sound pervades every- 
thing. This fact seems to be a neglected advantage. After all," 
getting back to Madison Avenue, "the housewife can knit and listen 
at the same time." * * * 



114 



SPONSOR 




UNPADDED SELL 

Amarillo is the "capital" of 
the Texas Panhandle. 230 miles 
from the nearest larger city, it 
is the retail center for over 30 
Texas, Oklahoma and New 
Mexico counties. KGNC-TV's 
0.1 mv line includes 19 of them. 
As a distribution center, Am- 
arillo serves parts of five 
states; total sales average 
more than $250,000,000 annual- 
ly. Marketplace for Panhandle 
agriculture, headquarters for 
oil, gas and other industry, 
Amarillo is an active commer- 
cial center. For three consecu- 
tive years it has been No. 1 for 
the nation in retail sales per 
household. 

If this suggests that KGNC- 
TV is worth an advertising in- 
vestment, it's no coincidence. 

KGNC-TV Channel 4 

Amarillo, Texas 100,000 watts 

NBC Affiliate 

National Representatives : 
The Katz Agency 



23 JANUARY 1956 



115 



In looking 
over the 

OBVIOUS 

Don t 

overlook 
the 

POSITIVE! 




It's this simple! 

In only 114 days of commercial opera 

tion WNDU-TV has achieved the Number 2 

position* oi audience dominance in the 

South Bend-Elkhart market. This impressive 

showing expresses eloquently the accep- 
tance of WNDU-TV by the more than 200,000 

families it serves and the confidence 
shown this station by its advertisers both 
local and national. We are proud and thank 

ful for this auspicious beginning. In only 

^114 days, we couldn't ask for more. 

Wtp. * Total "Firsts" by quarter-hour seg- 
jffiT merits according to ARB Nov. 6-72. 

w 



Represented Nationally 
by MEEKER TV 



WNDU-TV 

CHANNEL 46 



Continued 

from 

page 25 




Eugene D. Hill, General Manager of the Florida 10,000 
watter W-GTO has developed at least one sound formula 
for interesting pop music programing. And since he was 
nice enough to send along an outline of the approach with 
his letter, I assume he won't mind my passing it along to 
other broadcasters, notwithstanding the last, humorous para- 
graph of his letter. Here's Gene's note and format: 

Dear Joe: 

We here at GTO greatly enjoyed your recent piece about the 
importance of music selection. 

Following principles laid down by one of the old timers in 
the music programing field, KWK, our "daddy," and adapt- 
ed to fit the particular needs of Peninsular Florida, we have 
set up programing procedures outlined on the enclosed d.j. 
policy sheet. 

Response to "Formatted" music in the area has been great! 
Careful adherence to a three to-one music-to-talk ratio has 
also impressed folks favorable hereabouts. Daily skull ses- 
sions with each d.j. going over air checks of his previous 
day's work round out a controlled d.j. operation which we 
think is the ONLY way to program music and news. 
Your comments, if heeded, should do a lot to clear up the 
aii lanes, but frankly we'd just as soon, from a competitive 
standpoint, everybody else ignored them! 

Sincerely 

RADIO STATION W-GTO 
Eugene D. Hill 
General Manager 
P.S. The Format sheet doesn't mention it, but d.j.'s here 
do NOT select or pull their wax. Two librarians have ab- 
solute and final say so and list everything 24 hours in ad- 
vance save the current top hit tunes which are picked by 
telephone calls from seven leading record stores every after- 
noon, featured on the FIRST FIVE SHOW, then listed for 
the next day's shows and placed in the d.j. shows where 
balance and pace best let them fit. 

The heart of the W-GTO format, which has worked so 
successfully, is that in a one hour show (with same ratios 
maintained for shows running longer) jockeys must play 
one record in the current top five list; one record in the 
current six to ten list; four records from any of the first five 
list for the past eight years; six standards and three new 
releases. This, as anyone who follows music programing. 
will testify cannot fail to produce a well-balanced pop show, 
and still is not overloaded with current top ten material. 
More about all this anon. * • * 



116 



SPONSOR 



Advertisement 



Marketing Gold Mine! 

By John Pepper and Bert Ferguson 




There's not a sales manager alive 
who wouldn't be glad to give his eye- 
teeth for a brand new market. Well, 
we've got one. Not simply brand new. 
But brand new and heavily populated. 
Brand new and free spending. Brand 
new and sold 100 percent on one 
medium ! 

Try and find a market like it — we'll 
bet you can't! This single market is 
bigger than New York City. Bigger 
than Los Angeles. Bigger than St. 
Louis — Cleveland — Philadelphia. 

And it's been right under the nose of 
everybody in Memphis for a long time. 
But until our radio station WDIA be- 
came the first to program exclusively 
for Negro listeners here, this great new 
market remained undiscovered. 
10% of USA: For WDIA commands 
the Negro market in this area. And 
right here are close to 10 percent of all 
the Negroes in the entire United States! 
We call it the "Golden Market." It 
numbers 1,230,724 Negroes. 
Spend 80% : These folks make money. 
What is even more important to sales 
managers, they spend most of it. 

It is a fact that these folks spend, on 
the average, 80 percent of the money 
they earn. They spend it on consumer 
goods and services. 

And here's something else. As has 
been recently pointed out in SPONSOR, 
these folks are not to be classified as 
"buyers from a low income group." 
Quality Buyers: They buy, if any- 
thing, the better quality items for sale. 
They buy plenty of matches and baking 
soda and soft drinks. But they're also 
eager customers for big items. Big cars. 
Nice houses. Fancy suites of furniture. 

What we're getting at is this. These 



folks buy for the same reasons that 
other folks buy. But they have addi- 
tional reasons, peculiar to their own 
group. 

The Memphis market is 40 percent 
Negro — an important fact to think 
about in its own right. But add to it 
these facts. 

That Negroes buy 64.8 percent of all 
flour sold in Memphis. 

Negroes buy 56.6 percent of all laun- 
dry bleaches sold in Memphis. 

Negroes buy 50.3 percent of all may- 
onnaise sold in Memphis. 

Negroes buy 60 percent of all chest 
rubs sold in Memphis. 

Negroes buy 60 percent of all deo- 
dorants sold in Memphis. 

That is not "low income" buying. 
That is what we might call "special 
group" buying. For special reasons. 

And one of those reasons is that Ne- 
groes in the South use their homes for 
a great part of their social life. They 
spend money on things for their homes. 

They have larger than average fam- 
ilies. They spend money on things for 
their children. 

The point is that they are willing — 
far more willing than the average man 
— to spend their money. They have 
been spending it, and are continuing 
to spend it. 

In our WDIA area, their wages will 
amount to $278,152,551.00 this year. 
That's over a quarter billion dollars. 

And remember that 80 percent of it 
is going to be spent on things for home 
and family — consumer goods. 
Their own Station: Now here is 
where we can tell you how you can 
reach this market — positively. 

You can reach it with WDIA. 

For WDIA was the first station to 
talk to these folks in accents they know 
and understand, in the Southern city 
that ranks first in Negro population. 

WDIA uses Negro music. Turn the 
dial idly — you can't mistake it. 

WDIA uses Negro voices. Willa 
Monroe, star of "The Tan Town Home- 
maker show," was the first Negro wo- 
man broadcaster in America. Ford 
Nelson, star of "Glory Train," "High- 
way to Heaven" and "Tan Town Jubi- 
lee," is known to every Negro for miles 
and miles around. 



Tremendous Response: No wonder 
these folks regard WDIA so proudly as 
the only station — their station! No 
wonder they keep WDIA tuned in — 
morning, noon and night. 

No wonder this keen appreciation — 
this fierce devotion — has swept WDIA 
from 250 watts to 50,000 watts of pow- 
er — in just one big step! 

No wonder this feeling has put 
WDIA at the top of both Hooper and 
Pulse tabulations. And this, in a field 
of 8 stations, some of which had been 
on the air in Memphis for more than 
25 years! 

Does this combination of heavy 
spending, concentration of customers 
and direct contact through a single 
medium of unmatched acceptance get 
results? 

You bet it gets results. 

Here are just a few of the nationally 
famous advertisers who came to WDIA 
and got results — whopping results: 

Crisco, Halo, Kool Ciga- 
rettes, Super Suds, Drano, 
Folger's Coffee, Hunt's To- 
mato Sauce, Kellogg's Corn 
Flakes, Sivansdousn Cake 
Mixes, Pet Milk, Wildroot 
Cream Oil, Gold Medal 
Flour, Wrigley. 

We could add a list of many more. 

But we'd like to talk about the kind 
of product and sales problem that es- 
pecially interest you. No matter what 
ihe product, we'll have some pertinent 
information. No matter how the prob- 
lem of making sales in the South has 
looked to you until now, this is a new 
slant. 

You write us a note, and tell us what 
product you're working with. We'll 
send you back promptly the hot — not 
cold — figures on our "Golden Market." 

WDIA is represented nationally by 
John E. Pearson Company. 




-2&? 



JOHN~PEPPER, President 



\uM V- 



BERT FERGUSON, General Manager 



Jt*^^-f 



HAROLD WALKER, Commercial Manager 



23 JANUARY 1956 



117 




Viewers petition FCC for revival of deceased I III station 



The plight of uhf stations is well 
known in the industry, but it is seldom 
brought to the attention of the public 
as strikingly as was done in the case 
of KTVQ, Oklahoma City. The chan- 
nel 25 outlet had been in difficulty 
competing with two vhf stations in the 
market, finally ending in bankruptcy. 
After the bankruptcy proceedings, a 
federal court ordered the station to 
curtail operations unless it could 
switch to a vhf channel. 

The station applied for the tempo- 
rary use of channel 11, an allocated 
educational channel for which there is 
monetary appropration by Oklahoma. 
Because there can be no appropriation 
until 1957, Governor Raymond Gary 
approved the use of channel 11 until 
KTVQ could be granted a vhf. Al- 
though the FCC was said to be con- 
sidering the allocation of a third vhf 

Heavy merchandising plan 
tied to Mennen spot film 

Mennen's sponsorship of Passport 
to Danger in 30 markets is being 
backed by promotions that are plan- 
ned to reach 50% of the total food 
and drug retailers in the country. The 
mailing is designed to establish con- 
tact between the show's star, Cesar 
Romero, and the dealers. Romero is 
featured in the tv commercials as well 
as in the point-of-sale material, for 
the ABC Film Syndication show. 

Passport to Danger is Mennen's 
first spot tv film show and it was 
bought through McCann-Erickson after 
dozens of properties were screened. 
One of the factors that decided agency 
and sponsor on the show was the suit- 
ability of the star to the Mennen for 
Men line, which is advertised on the 
program. 

Other major Mennen tv properties 
include the Wednesday night fights 
on ABC TV and the Saturday after- 
noon basketball games on NBC TV. 

Passport to Danger reaches a wider 
male audience. * * * 



channel to the market, it did not allow 
the requested channel-borrowing. The 
Oklahoma Educational Tv Authority 
and its national counterpart both op- 
posed the move. 

Newspapers, radio stations and the 
two competitive vhf stations in the 
market carried stories urging viewers 
favoring the continuance of the sta- 
tion's programing to write or wire the 
FCC. The station ceased broadcasting 
on 15 December, and went out in a 
burst of protest. A five-and-a-half- 
hour protest telethon was conducted 
with various civic leaders and average 
citizens joining in the appeal for view- 
er letters to be sent to the FCC. The 
station was still off the air when 
sponsor went to press, though the 
station management hoped the FCC 
might \et rule favorably on the temp- 
orary use of channel 11. * * * 

Tv sells imaginary beer, 
hut sponsor is pleased 

What started out to be a gag by an 
early morning radio announcer turned 
into a profitable campaign on tv for 
the Pittsburgh Brewing Co. Rege 
Cordic, the announcer, joked about a 
brew he labeled Olde Frothingslosh 
Pale Stale Ale. 

The brewing company saw a good 
merchandising possibility in the idea 
and packaged their regular Tech beer 
with Old Frothingslosh labels. Car- 
toons explained that the label was in 
fun, but that the beer was of the best 
quality. Tv was the most adaptable 
medium for the humorous qualities 
attributed to the beer. For example, 
its lightness was demonstrated by hav- 
ing it float away into the air, the fact 
that the foam was on the bottom was 
shown with an inverted camera image. 

Buyers evidently liked the light 
touch during the holiday season, be- 
cause the brewery was sold out of Old 
Frothingslosh, without its other sales 
suffering. Steady demand may keep 
the brand on the market. * * * 



Kansas stations bring 
'Christmas to the \««-«jo.s* 

A combined eight-day radio and tv 
drive brought home to Kansans the 
unhappy plight of the Navajo Indians 
at Fort Defiance, Arizona. With the 
holiday season approaching, a sound- 
on-film record of the conditions under 
which the Indians live was made by 
the station and presented to the Kan- 
sas audience. 

Donations of toys and wearing ap- 
parel poured in, merchants loaned 
their personnel to sort the garments 
according to size and their trucks to 
make pick-ups of donations. Canned 
foods were given and $2,300 in cash 
as well. 




Navajos unload Christmas gifts from Kansas 

By the end of the collection period, 
mounds of gifts were ready for dis- 
tribution. Two trailer trucks were 
needed to carry the better than 60,000 
pounds of Christmas cheer to Fort 
Defiance where the recipients awaited 
the arrival of the trucks. They ar- 
rived in time for the gifts to be dis- 
tributed before Christmas. * * * 

Miss KCOH contest crowds 
Houston City Auditorium 

An outstanding array of talent was 
present recently to help KCOH, Hous- 
ton, pick Ethel Banks as Miss KCOH. 
Count Basie made the award and pro- 
vided music for the 10,000 listeners 
who attended the event. Miss KCOH 
received cash prizes, a radio, a tv set 
( Please turn to page 134) 




Miss KCOH contest draws 10,000 listeners 



118 



SPONSOR 




HARLLEE BRANCH, JR. 



Portrait by Fabian Bachrach 



*We consider it a privilege to make the 

Payroll Savings Plan available to all our people" 



As President of Georgia Power Company, Mr. Harllee 
Branch, Jr., can be proud of his company's Payroll 
Savings Plan— more than 50% of Georgia Power's em- 
ployees are Payroll Savers. They are putting more than 
$423,000 into U. S. Savings Bonds each year. But, Mr. 
Branch's interest goes beyond his own company Plan. A 
few months ago, as President of the Edison Electric 
Institute, he asked all the 185 member companies in the 
electric utility industry to join in an industry-wide effort 
to increase employee percentages in their Payroll Sav- 
ings Plans. 

First results of the industry campaign are now com- 



ing in. Gulf Power Company has reached 87.3% em- 
ployee participation . . . Utah Power and Light employees 
have enrolled 69.6% . . . Wisconsin Electric Power re- 
ports 69.8% . . . Wisconsin-Michigan Power Company, 
62% . . . Wisconsin Public Service, 57.6% . . . Lake Supe- 
rior District Power, 52%. 

Has every employee in your company been offered an 
opportunity to enroll in the Payroll Savings Plan? If not, 
communicate with Savings Bond Division, U. S. Treas- 
ury Department, Washington, D. C. Your State Sales 
Director will show you how easy it is to conduct a 
person-to-person canvass. 



The United States Government does not pay for this advertising. The Treasury Department 
thanks, for their patriotic donation, the Advertising Council and 



SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS, INC. 



23 JANUARY 1956 




HEADACHES 

{Continued from page 37 1 

may skyrocket, and then the station 
manager who's heen relying mostly 
on film will face the problem of local 
programing when talent availability 
and his own facilities may be at a 
low point. 

"Every time I buy a syndicated 
show, I feel as if I were in Las Vegas," 
a Midwestern station owner com- 
plained. "I've got to worry about 
whether advertisers will be willing to 
pay the higher rate for a film show. 
Then I've got to worry about the price 
I'm expected to pay for it. How do 

know a station in the same size 



market isn't getting the film for 
a week less?" 

The lack of standardization in cost 
of syndicated shows was among the 
most frequently mentioned program- 
ing headaches. Station managers felt 
that they're never sure whether they're 
buying at the best price. 

"I was offered fourth reruns of a 
show for an outrageous price a few 
months ago," said the manager of a 
station in a three-station market. "A 
couple of weeks after I turned the 
show down, a competing station in 
this market started running the series, 
and it's been shellacking our show 
opposite with its ratings." 

"Buying feature films isn't a cinch 



either," most station managers agree. 
"There's the problem of how many 
times the film can be run without 
irritating the viewers. At the same 
time, what station can bring in the 
cost of a feature on one or two runs 
only?" 

Station option time: This is an 
area that caused some furor during 
the season past when major networks 
scheduled their feeds in station op- 
tion time. 

"We can't say too much, because 
a good show will enhance the value 
of the time slots adjacent to it," one 
network affiliate paid. "But don't 
forget that we have to make up the 




I. Veir stations on air* 



CITY & STATE 


CALL 
LETTERS 


CHANNEL 
NO. 


ON-AIR 
DATE 


ERP <kw)** 
Visual 


Antenna 
(ft)*** 


NET 
AFFILIATION 


STNS. 
ON AIR 


SETS IN 

MARKET' 

1000) 


PERMITEE. MANAGER, REP 


LAREDO, TEX. 
RICHMOND, VA. 


KHAD-TV 
WRVA-TV 


8 
12 


3 Jan. 

4 Jan. 


297 
240 


160 

485 





None NFA 

WTVR 494 
WXEX-TV 


Vidicon Indus*.! its of America 
H. C. Avery, Jr. & 
David H. Cole, co-owners 

Richmond Television Corp. 
C. T. Lucy, pres. 
William T. Reed, Jr., v.p. 
Barron Howard, v.p. & gen. mgr. 
Morton G. Thalhimer, v.p. 



II. /Veto construction permits* 



CITY 4 STATE 



CALL 
LETTERS 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



DATE OF GRANT 



ERP (kw)« 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)*** 



STATIONS 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 

MARKETt 

(000) 



PERMITEE. MANAGER. RADIO Rl 



EVANSVILLE, IND. 



21 Dec. 



316 



607 



V/FIE 
WENT 



100 Evansville Television Inc. 

Rex Schepp, pres. 
B. F. Schepp, v.p. 



Iff. \eu- applications 



CITY t STATE 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



DATE 
FILED 



ERP (kw) # 

Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)"* 



ESTIMATED 
COS! 



ESTIMATED 

1ST YEAR 

OP. EXPENSE 



TV STATIONS 
IN MARKET 



APPLICANT. AM AFFILIATE 



BISHOP, CALIF. 
ELMIRA, N. Y. 



3 1 31 Dee. 100 713 $29,551 $24,000 None 

9 7 Jan. 316 1,000 $501,850 $480,000 WTVE? 



James R. Oliver & S. A. Clsler 
d/b as Inyo Bcstg. Co. 

Elmira Star-Gazette, Inc. 
Fra-k E. Gannett, pres. 
Frank E. Tripp, v.p. 



BOX SCORE 



U. S. stations or air... 



4231 



Markets covered 



260§ 



'Both new tp.'t and nations going on the air listed here are those whlrh occurred netweer 
28 November and 9 December or on which information could be obtained in that period. Stations 
■re considered to be on the air when commercial operation starts. **ElTective radiated po-wet 
▲oral power usually Is one-half the visual power. ***Antenna height above average terrain Inm 
tbore ground), tlnformation on the number of sets in markets where not designated as beinj 



from NBC Research, consists of estimates from the stations or reps and must be deemed appro 
mate. SData from N"RC Research and Planming. N"FA* No fleures arallahle at presstJ 
on sets In market. --Community would support proposed lower-power station at least three yet 
or until such time as it becomes self-sustaining. -^Presently off air, but still retains C.P. 






120 



SPONSOR 



1955 Sylvania Award 

takes its place 

on the crowded WBZ -TV mantel 



The major news awards keep pouring 
in at WBZ-TV. In 1954 it was the Radio- 
Television News Directors top TV award 
. . . early in 1955, the Headliners Medal 
for dramatic coverage of a spot news 
event. 

Now it's the Sylvania Award for "local 
news and special events" for WBZ-TV 
to take its place on the WBZ-TV mantel 
with national awards in virtually all 
categories. 

Small wonder! WBZ-TV News is pro- 
vided by top-flight news editors, ace 
reporters and a network of 82 motion 
picture correspondents scattered 
throughout New England. And how 
New Englanders love their news . . . 
reported to them a dozen times each 
day on WBZ-TV. 

Put this interest and prestige behind 
your product ... in the nation's sixth 
largest market. Showcase your message 
with dynamic reporter Jack Chase and 
personable meteorologist Don Kent ap- 
pearing regularly throughout the morn- 
ing hours. 

Award yourself greater sales through 
WBZ-TV news. Call Herb Masse, WBZ- 
TV Sales Manager, ALgonquin 4-5670 
(Boston), or Eldon Campbell, WBC 
National Sales Manager, MUrray Hill 
7-0808. 



WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 



RADIO 
BOSTON — WBZ + WBZA 
PHILADELPHIA — KYW 
PITTSBURGH — KDK A 
FORT WAYNE — WOWO 
PORTLAND— KEX 



TELEVISION 

BOSTON — WBZ-TV 
PHILADELPHIA— WPTZ 
PITTSBURGH— KDK A TV 
SAN FRANCISCO— KPIX 



KPIX REPRESENTED BY THE KATZ AGENCY. INC. 
ALL OTHER WBC STATIONS REPRESENTED BY FREE a PETERS. INC. 




23 JANUARY 1956 



121 



income from a half-hour local sale 
with these adjacent time slots plus 
the network revenue for the preempted 
half-hour. And the network revenue 
alone is considerably less than the sale 
of that half-hour might provide local- 
ly. Suppose the station had sold a 
half-hour syndicated film show to a 
dairy in Omaha and the network 
comes in with its show. It creates a 
problem of dislocation and extra 
over-head in salesmen's time and cost 
because they have to go out and sell 



a different lineup and new breaks and 
20's near the network show." 

Continuity acceptance: "In tv, 

everybody wants to talk to the top 
guy," one station manager com- 
plained. "It's gotten to be a disease. 
A woman sees a show where some- 
one's having a cocktail, and right 
away my phone rings." 

Most station managers agree that 
the continuity acceptance problem is 
on the downgrade. There are fewer 




GROSS FARM 
INCOME IN THE 
KFAB AREA WAS 
OVER A BILLION 
THREE QUARTER 
MILLION DOLLARS 
LAST YEAR 



/ 



/ 






ionth you're invited 
ce the Facts with a 
who has almost be- 
come a legend in the Mid- 
West Empire. He's KFAB's Farm Service 
Director, Bill Macdonald. 

Anyone who has used mid-west radio 
knows Bill or knows about him. He's 
the dean of midwest farm directors 
with over 30 years on the mike and in 
the field. He's received practically 
every honor that can be bestowed on a 
radio farm service man. Plus that, he's 
a farmer's farm radio man, operating 
his own farm southeast of Lincoln from 
where his daily visits with midwest 
farmers originate. 

If you want to reach farm people with 
your message . . . and sell 'em at the 
same time, Face the Facts with a Free 
& Peters man and find out ALL ABOUT 
BILL MACDONALD. Or check with Gen- 
eral Manager Harry Burke . . . he's 
loaded with facts and figures on his 
Farm Service Director. 



\\N 



\ I 



.'/// 



N 



cfc^ 



^gS8 



j**** 



SS*^- 



>tf3 



ssa& 



tl^\\\\\\lll/////^% 

FAB 



omnHn nee huoio 



viewer protests, for example, today 
than there were five years ago. 

"Network tv programing has been 
one of the most important factors in 
broadening the national horizons," a 
Southern station manager told SPON- 
SOR. "Any number of shows that 
might have caused viewers to swarm 
all over me a few years ago, pass by 
virtually unprotested today." 

In commercial acceptance, on the 
other hand, the problem of "good 
taste" still persists. Station managers 
agree that once every 10 days or two 
weeks, an advertiser wants to put a 
questionable product on the air. 

"With more and more categories of 
accounts coming into tv, this is in- 
evitable," said the sales manager of 
an Ohio station. "For one thing, 
agencies try to overcome difficulties 
intrinsic in presentation of certain 
products with clever copy. But some- 
times the commercial still borders on 
the objectionable. Tv is viewed by 
the entire family, and we've got to be 
particularly careful in our censor- 
ship." 

"Here's the kind of thing that can 
burn you up sometimes," said another 
station manager. "This station gives 
over $3 million in time and facilities 
a year to non-commercial public ser- 
vice programing. We put out-of- 
pocket money into these shows to 
produce them in the first place. Then 
someone calls up and complains about 
the questionable taste of a local show 
or commercial and suggests the very 
kind of public service programing we 
already have on anyhow. Why don't 
the viewers inform themselves better 
before they gripe?" 

Studio space: The growing pains of 
a booming industry include problems 
of space shortage. There are more 
local shows to be produced today, 
more equipment to be accommodated. 

"Color is a problem that's not yet 
facing the majority of stations as it 
has faced us," the manager of a large 
metropolitan station added. "But it 
will within the next year or two. Even 
the control rack of color equipment 
takes up to three times as much 
space as black-and-white. Also, color 
cameras and lighting throw off more 
heat, and we've had to invest in ex- 
tra and costlier air conditioning." 

A large Midwestern network affili- 
ate carried the color and space prob- 
lem a step further: "It's costly to the 



122 



SPONSOR 



abc-tv's 
afternoon 




serves up 



at daytime 

prices 



your host, Allyn Edwards 



^"•xj 






am 




Topnotch TV at piggy -bank rates! Night- 
time quality at daytime prices! No matter 
how it's phrased, ABC-TV's great new After- 
noon Film Festival is television's most remark- 
able participation buy. Each weekday after- 
noon a superb motion picture never before 
seen on TV. Films like The Captive Heart, 
Genevieve, Desperate Moment, The Cruel Sea. 
Famous stars like Jean Simmons, Peggy 
Cummins, Stewart Granger, James Mason, 
Deborah Kerr. Personable Allyn Edwards is 
the host . . . and your salesman. The buying 
plan is flexible. The time slot (3 to 5 p. m. EST) 
seems sure to produce excellent ratings. Get 
all the facts on this exciting new participa- 
tion buy today. 



abc television network 




Jt. 



7 W. 66th St., New York 23, N. Y., SUsquehanna 7-5000 
20 North Wacker Drive, Chicago, 111., ANdover 3-0800 
277 Golden Gate, San Francisco, UNderhill 3-0077 



station to train color experts. It means 
pulling them off the shows they're 
working on, finding room for them 
to study and become expert techni- 
cians and replacing them on their 
shows. But we feel the extra ex- 
pense will certainly be worth it. 

Talent raiding: Are the station man- 
agers talent problems over once he's 
got a few local shows on the air with 
good ratings and long-term clients? 
"That's the time I usually really 



start worrying about the talent," a 
Midwestern station operator told 
sponsor, voicing the opinion of a ma- 
jority of station execs. "As soon as 
you've got a well-rated live show, you 
can be sure that the competitors in 
your market will have their eye on 
your star." 

In the case of local personalities 
and announcers, stations expect to be 
prey to raiding by other stations. 

"But there's another disease that 
makes local performers a headache to 



WMAZ 



announces the 
appointment of 

AVERY-KNODEL, inc. 

as its 

National Representative 

Your Avery-Knodel man is now prepared to give you the documented 
facts you should have before preparing your next spot schedule: 

FACTS about the growing importance of the Middle Georgia market. 

FACTS which document how WMAZ successfully solves problems 
arising from current distribution and sales factors in Metropolitan 
Macon itself. 

FACTS that show why it takes WMAZ to give you full, intensive 
coverage of the vital Middle Georgia area. 

FACTS that show how WMAZ dominates the audience in the rich, 
growing area it serves. 

Ask your Avery-Knodel man for the facts . . . and you'll put WMAZ 
to work for you! 



WMAZ 

Macon 

1 0,000 w 

940 KC 

CBS 



member of the 



GEORGIA 
BIG 



work with," added another station 
manager. "You might say that it's 
in the nature of showbusiness: As soon 
as you develop some new young talent 
and give them a break, they can see 
their names in big lights and off to 
New York they go." 

Show raiding is almost non-exis- 
tent except in rare instances in one of 
the major production centers when a 
network occasionally picks up a local 
show and develops it into a network 
package. 

Client, agency pressure: In cases 
where station managers have personal 
contact with national clients and agen- 
cies, their headache's one of being too 
accessible. 

"If a timebuyer doesn't get satisfac- 
tion from the salesman, he pulls his 
account man in," the general manager 
of a New York station told sponsor. 
"If the account executive doesn't get 
the answer he wants or the rate 
change, he has the top agency guy 
calling a higher-level man at the 
broadcast operation. Finally, you've 
got two chairmen of the board talk- 
ing about a 13-week schedule of three 
weekly announcements, or about one 
camera on one show." 

Virtually the opposite communica- 
tions problem exists for station man- 
agers further removed from their na- 
tional clients and top agencies. 

"By the time the rep passes on 
availabilities to a buyer and by the 
time client approval is gotten, your 
whole schedule may have changed," 
said an Oklahoma station owner. "It's 
rougher to sell without personal con- 
tact with the client and his strategists. 
Our sales manager visits the potential 
agencies and advertisers some half 
dozen times a year. I make it about 
four times a year. But this isn't 
enough. And no matter how good 
your rep, your market and station 
story gets diluted by too many mid- 
dle men." 

Added a Midwestern station man- 
ager: "If our sales manager and I 
could huddle with a client, learn his 
over-all strategy and product and 
sales problems, we could make local 
market recommendations that might 
change his entire outlook on best ways 
to use our station. One local daytime 
show might do more for him that a 
costly schedule of hard-to-get night- 
time announcements. But the agen- 
cies are very jealous of their planning 



124 



SPONSOR 



prerogatives, and we're too far re- 
moved from the clients geographically 
to be brought into the picture at an 
early enough stage." 

Cost of selling daytime: It's prover- 
bial among tv station managers that 
less than 10% of the pitches result 
in orders. There's need for costly 
research and sales promotion to get 
clients to balance schedules through- 
out the telecast day rather than 
crowding into peak viewing times. 

"The popularity of nighttime makes 
the cost of selling other time periods 
more costly in a way," some station 
managers feel. "There's almost an 
entrenched prejudice that only adja- 
cencies like Sullivan or Lucy can pay 
off. This means that we've got to 
provide all types of viewing habit re- 
search, market information, descrip- 
tions of local personalities to sell time 
in Class "B" periods with their lower 
rates and profit." 

Time differential: Always a prob- 
lem for stations removed from the 
point of network show origination, 
this headache became a migraine 
during last fall's switchover from Day- 
light Saving to Standard Time. 

"We had three reshuffles," recalls 
the manager of a station in the Rocky 
Mountain zone. "And beyond the 
obvious and sometimes not measurable 
increase in operational costs because 
of man-hours involved in such 
changes, we had a batch of other head- 
aches. For one thing, we had to 
decide whether to run a major net- 
work half-hour at 4:00 p.m. instead 
of 8:00 p.m. or take it on kine and 
lose one whole episode, rerun another. 
Commercially speaking, this meant a 
choice between sacrificing ratings or 
sacrificing advertiser revenue. One 
way or the other, it cost us money." 

Research headaches: In major mar- 
kets and secondary markets, research 
is a costly prerequisite to selling the 
station. 

"And market information is vital 
no matter where a station's located," 
station managers agree. You can't 
rely on rating services for this infor- 
mation. For example, one city ranks 
95th as a market, but there's a 
station in that market that's 18th in 
coverage as market information will 
show, because factories and small 
towns are springing up within its area. 



A city can rank higher as a market 
but have a smaller potential for ad- 
vertisers on its stations because of tv 
station radius." 

A form of market research that's 
being used increasingly and at sub- 
stantial cost by stations intent on sell- 
ing to specific national clients mea- 
sures dollar volume purchases of such 
clients' particular products within a 
station's viewing area. 

"You might be in the 200th market 
by broad national standards, but it 



could be the 12th-highest market 
where tea consumption is concerned," 
one station manager explained. "If 
you've got this information tailor- 
made to specific advertisers, you'll do 
him and the station a service. With 
this type of information, you can get 
into the earlier planning stages of 
an advertiser's program in your mar- 
ket and you'll be able to set up sched- 
ules balanced by criteria other than 
ratings only. But it all costs money 
to compile." * * * 




Frontiers 
of 

Science 

in Oklahoma! 



Now in the national spotlight because of its 
scientific leadership . . . the Frontiers of Science 
Foundation of Oklahoma is placing special emphasis 
on the value of scientific teaching in schools. 

So, imagine the important impact on young 
Oklahomans when their popular WKY-TV hero 
"3-D Danny" visits their schools each week for 
assembly programs in which he encourages their 
interest in the study of science. Sound-on-film 
interviews are included as part of these programs 
. . . and telecast later on the "3-D Danny" show, 
Monday through Friday — 5 to 6 p.m. 

WKY-TV quickly embraces such projects as being 
worthy of its policy of programming with a purpose 
... to please and serve the greatest number of 
viewers each telecast-minute of the day. 



the viewing habit in Oklahoma 
for over seven years 

Owned and operated by THE OKLAHOMA PUBLISH- 
ING CO. — The Daily Oklahoman, Oklahoma City 
Times, The Farmer-Stockman, WKY radio, WSFA 
radio, WSFA-TV — Represented by KATZ AGENCY. 

See your Katz man for availabilities 



THE NATION'S FIRST COLOR TV STATION 




23 JANUARY 1956 



125 



SATURATION RADIO 

{Continued from page 39) 

cast is compiled, and listeners are told 
the whole story as much as possible. 

"I also call Albert Prugh when he 
winds up his morning trip to the Los 
Angeles Wholesale Markets. Mr. Prugh 
is editor of the Federal State Market 
News, and I feel his comments are ob- 
jective. Sometimes, his comments are 
taped the morning of the broadcast by 
telephone. 



"I use late United Press market re- 
ports and farm news, releases from the 
University of California and material 
from the University's Cooperative Ex- 
tension Service. Also contributing to 
the five-times-weekly scripts are books 
and magazines galore, cook books, en- 
cyclopedias, home economics texts and 
periodicals, publications and bulletins 
of Federal and State government bu- 
reaus, releases of such organizations 
as the Western Growers Association 
and the voluntary cooperatives of Cali- 
fornia fruit and berry growers." 




— \ 










One million big-framed Kansas beef cattle spent the summer 
grazing the Bluestem, the nation's richest pasture area. Now 
these choice steers are on their way to market, where they'll bring 
#200 apiece! That's #200,000,000 into the pockets of Kansas 
Farmers . . . cash to be converted into cars, tractors, appliances, 
food, drugs — and your product! 

In Kansas The farmer (with an income of #8,830* after taxes!) 
is your best customer. Sell him with the radio station he listens 
to most— WIBW! 

•Consumer Markets, 1955. 

■ Kansas Radio Audience, 1954. 



TOPEKA, KANSAS 

Ben Ludy, Gen. Mgr. 

WIBW & WIBW-TV in Topeka 

KCKN in Kansas City 

Rep: Capper Publications, Inc. 




SERVING A MARKET 52% ABOVE THE U.S. AVERAGE 



The amount of research that goes 
into the capsule show pays off by 
giving an authoritative ring to what 
newsman Alan Lisser tells Angeleno 
homemakers via KBIG, Von's feels. 

Much emphasis during the show is 
put on the "why's" back of prices and 
supplies of produce. The effect of 
weather conditions — such as the recent 
California floods — on crops, the prob- 
lems of produce growers, transporta- 
tion factors and other agricultural ele- 
ments are all pointed up in discussing 
what are "best buys" in produce. 

But Homemakers News is not oper- 
ated from behind a news desk at the 
music-and-news station. Margee Phil- 
lips often makes field trips to gather 
her women's-interest news where it's 
happening. The attractive blonde Miss 
Phillips, who bears a strong resem- 
blance to Doris Day, has become a fa- 
miliar sight in the pre-dawn hours at 
the huge Los Angeles Produce Market. 
Produce raisers have come to know 
and like her, and the show, too. B. B. 
Blank, vice president of the California 
Mushroom Farms in Whittier, Cal., re- 
cently stated: 

"Since Miss Phillips' detailed inspec- 
tion of our mushroom growing and 
packing facilities a few weeks ago, we 
have been watching with great interest 
the results of the subsequent radio ap- 
proach to the subject. It was most ob- 
vous that she had read into the subject 
prior to her visit, which no doubt en- 
abled her to gain a fuller understand- 
ing of this art. 

"We have listened to the copy for 
Von's, and were very much impressed 
with the smooth handling of the diver- 
gent elements of mushroom culture. 
Without avoiding or distorting any 
scientific details, the entire story was 
an interesting, educational and ap- 
pealing approach to the prospective 
buyer. Since this type of advertising, 
our regular sales of mushrooms to 
Von's have increased 25%, and on 
'special' advertising have gone several 
hundred per cent over normal. We feel 
that these outstanding achievements 
are the result of a manifestation of 
Von's very high merchandising stand- 
ards." 

Short-term results: Although Home- 
makers News is geared to the long pull 
of building good will for the Von's 
stores, the program series is used by 
the client to gain sharp sales increases 
in particular items. 



126 



SPONSOR 



According to KBIG's Bob McAn- 
drews, tests have shown that when 
specific items are plugged on both 
KBIG and the Thursday-Friday news- 
papers, results are more outstanding 
than if either medium is used alone. 
"Newspaper ads," he states, "merely 
list the bare bones of the item and its 
price. Radio, with its more leisurely 
five-minute pace daily, allows time to 
build on the skeleton. Every time a 
definite product is featured on Home- 
makers News, sales show a marked in- 
crease." 

One of the earliest checks made by 
Von's on the pulling power of the pro- 
gram series occurred two seasons ago 
at Hallowe'en. 

Checkers at the Von's stores were 
given a supply of fancy-colored heavy- 
duty bags in which youngsters making 
the rounds of their neighbors could de- 
posit their collected "trick or treat" 
items. 

However, checkers were instructed 
to hide the bags from sight, and not 
to give them out unless specifically 
asked to do so by a customer. The 
only public media used to push the 
give-away item was Homemakers 
News. 



KGVO-TV 

MISSOULA, MONTANA 
adds to its 

"Captive Coverage" 

HELENA* 

Montana's Capital City with 
NO Increase in regular LOW 
KGVO-TV rates 

*via Community Cable 

MAGNIFY YOUR SALES 

IN THIS STABLE $160,000,000.00 

MARKET 



University City 

• 
Rich Lumbering and 
Agricultural Area 



167 Mountainous Miles from Spokane 



23 JANUARY 1956 




The results were immediate, and 
startling. Within 24 hours, Von's em- 
ployees gave out 25,000 bags — the en- 
tire stock — to customers who had 
heard about them on the five-minute 
daily show. 

One reason for the success of the 
show's featured items is the fact that 
the program does not have commer- 
cials in the usual sense. 

Each show, as mentioned earlier, 
spotlights a particular produce item, 
tells of its background, menus uses, 
features, and how to prepare it. Then, 
the fact that the item is available in 
the Von's supermarkets is quietly wov- 
en into the copy. Thus, the selling is 
never really obvious — and the home- 
maker audience finds itself "sold" 
without really realizing exactly why. 

Says produce executive "Buzz" Bol- 
stad : 

"If we really want to feel the strong, 
immediate effect of our radio adver- 
tising, all we have to do is make a mis- 
take. Recently, we announced a spe- 
cial on the air which was available at 
only a few of our 24 markets. All day 
we had telephoned complaints — espe- 
cially from store managers!" * * * 



MOSLER SAFE 

I Continued from page 33) 

ably no good, (3) Even if your build- 
ing is supposed to be fireproof or fire- 
resistant, that's not complete protec- 
tion, (4) You can't collect fully on 
your fire insurance unless you have 
records to show proof of loss. 

"Like I said — it's negative stuff. 
People don't like to think negatively." 

"More than that; it's dry," added 
Littlehale. "We've got to fight for at- 
tention. Dramatize it. That calls for 
all the props and gimmicks you can 
find — and still maintain the dignity 
traditionally associated with the idea 
of safety and security." 

Then why not add the impact of vi- 
sion and use tv? 

"We tried that. We shot a film that 
really dramatized the hell out of the 
idea of lost records. Showed a safe 
smoldering after a real holocaust . . . 
vital papers charred or in ashes . . . the 
whole thing looked like it had been cre- 
mated. The full scare treatment." 

What happened? 

"We sent a print to one Southern 
station. They returned it. Said it was 
too frightening; they didn't need our 
money that bad. 



KPRC-TV 

FIRST IN HOUSTON 

with 17 out of 20* 
top nighttime shows 

OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER 



1. 


George Gobel 




KPRC-TV 




2. 


Hit Parade 




KPRCTV 




3. 


Robert Montgom 


ery 


KPRC-TV 




4. 


Medic 




KPRC-TV 





5. $64,000 Question Station C 



6. Lux Video Theatre KPRC-TV 



7. Waterfront 



KPRC-TV 



8. 


Truth or Const 


jquences KPRC-TV 


■ * . 


9. 


Life of Riley 


KPRC-TV 





10. Great Gildersleeve KPRC-TV 



11. This Is Your Life KPRC-TV 



12. 


Disneyland 


Station B 




13. 


Father Knows Best 


KPRC-TV 




14. 


People Are Funny 


KPRC-TV 





15. Fireside Theatre KPRC-TV 



16. Caesar's Hour 



17. Ford Theatre 



18. Perry Como 



KPRCTV 



KPRC-TV 



KPRC-TV 



19. City Detective KPRC-TV 



20 WyattEarp 



Station B 



* ARB — October, November, 1955 

KPRCTV 

HOUSTON • CHANNEL 2 

JACK HARRIS Nationally Represented By 

Vice President & General Manager EDWARD PETRY & CO. 




a* 



>dde«' 



„beu 






aftet 
Vie al< - 



t»' 



ttog* 



r cbe<*- 
BC r g et ^ 

out <° w .- out Vi'Ae 



Ob'*o' s 

•you 

to? 

to 

abo^ 

ne^ s 

b ° tS ,es *« 
tbe ^ vg 



dcaSt "" -ceoe o -/ _„ e ds 



cvtV 



*o 



U 

do* n 
tbvuS- 
out 




A.Vto n 



s ooW 



idep 



John E. Pearson Co., National Repre 



i tbe 
d ^ ee 



ne^ 



•te 



3altv cu^ .w. be 



<Ti>' pres 




GET A STRANGLEHOLD 

ON THESE BIG MARKETS! 

• Wonderful WYOMING 

• Western NEBRASKA 

• Northern COLORADO 
Tie 'em up with .... 

KVWO 

Wyoming's top Hooper Station 

Represented Nationally by ... . 

JOS. HERSHEY McGILLVRA 

New York • Chicago • Atlanta 
Los Angeles • San Francsico 

Write, Wire, Phone William T. Kemp 

Box 926 • Ph: 2-6433 

Cheyenne, Wyoming 







WESTERLY R. I 



IWRiffoSjM 



PULSE 3-AREA SURVEY 

SEPT. 1955 SHOWS 
LISTENING HOMES (%) 



WICH 29 

Network "A" 18 
Network "B" 14 
Network "C" 9 



1000 

WATTS 

1310 KC 



REPRESENTATIVES 

GRANT WEBB ■ 270 Park Ave. N. Y. MU 8-7550 
R. C. FOSTER ■ Statler OffBldq. Boston HU 2-4845 



"So you see, we have to walk a 
tightrope; jolt 'em but don't scare 'em. 

"Anyway, if we couldn't pull out 
all the stops we figured radio at least 
got some punch into the story. And 
actually, when we played this Dragnet 
take-off series people around the office 
here told us they could picture the 
whole scene in their minds without 
video." 

With that settled, Littlehale and his 
agency, Stockton-West-Burkhart, Inc., 
Cincinnati, set about pinpointing their 
target. Obviously businessmen — exec- 
utives and owners of small businesses. 
Best time to get them: before they 
leave the house in the morning or may- 

I be while they're driving to the office. 
And, since a safe costing anywhere 

1 from a hundred to a few thousand 
dollars calls for personal follow-up 

i selling by the foot-soldier, client and 

j agency decided to attack in the cities 
where the company had ample branch 
office salesmen. These, of course, in- 
clude several of the top metropolitan 
areas in the country. 

With the help of agency head Joseph 
Nelson, Littlehale zeroed in on the 7- 
8:00 a.m. period. Primary objective 
was high ratings. In New York they 
got these from WNEW and WCBS with 
three to five announcements a week, 
depending on availabilities. But in 
New York they also made the one ex- 
ception to the criterion of high ratings 
by adding WQXR. The station, known 
for its upper-brow appeal, delivered 
about one-tenth of the 5.0 Pulse rat- 
ings of WNEW announcements, but 
more than made up for that by virtue 
of its heavy concentration of upper- 
echelon execs among its loyal audience. 
In Chicago it was WMAQ and 
WBBM. In Philadelphia, WCAU; in 
Boston, WEEI and WHDH; Buffalo, 
WGR; Washington, WTOP. 

The agency, of course, furnished a 
12-second live lead-out for the e.t. but 
occasionally drew a bonus, depending 
on whose shows it hit. On WNEW, for 
instance. Klaven and Finch bounced it 
around during the baseball season with 
zany comments to the effect that, for 
example, umpires now yell "Mosler!" 
when a runner beats the throw to the 
bag. Such ad libbing delivered more 
than the additional 12-second allot- 
ment. 

Played straight, tag copy to the 
Dragnet-type announcement went like 
this: 

"And that's what happens with 43 
out of 100 firms that lose their records 



128 



SPONSOR 



in a fire. Better get a copy of Mosler's 
new free booket, 'What you should 
know about office safes.' And find out 
how little it costs to own the world's 
best protection — a modern Mosler Rec- 
ord Safe. 

"In Boston, phone Copley 7-3010 
and ask for Mr. Anderson. Or write 
The Mosler Safe Co., 375 Boylston St., 
Boston 16, Mass." 

Closing lines varied with the city, 
naturally, but in at least one they 
varied considerably more than expect- 
ed. By some weird coincidence, in- 
stead of the phone number of the local 
Mosler branch, copy once carried on 
one of the Chicago stations included 
the number of the rep for another 
Windy City station! But even there 
the company got evidence of pull. 
Calls averaged eight to 10 a day for 
a week, the amused rep told Mosler 
officials. Elsewhere the average was 
two to three, and in New York four 
or five. 

"We didn't get the names of the peo- 
ple who called that Chicago rep," said 
Littlehale, "but the main thing was 
that we knew the name was getting 
across — even allowing for a little ex- 
aggeration as to the number quoted 
by the rep in his eagerness to rub it in. 
And one thing we've learned: radio 
gets our name across quicker than any 
other medium we've tried." 

Littlehale himself treks around the 
country whenever a new phase of ad- 
vertising is wheeled in, pepping up the 
boys on the firing line, explaining to 
dealers the kind of support they can 
expect from headquarters; bombard- 
ing them with round-ups of propa- 
ganda in the form of publicity via 
magazine and newspaper articles, per- 
sonal appearances by Mosler execu- 




"My husband listens to KRIZ 
Phoenix twenty-four hours a day." 



23 JANUARY 1956 



tives at new bank openings, televised 
business programs, conventions; tie- 
ins with print media advertising. 

"Believe me," says Littlehale, "we 
advertising boys get plenty of sugges- 
tions from the sales boys as to adver- 
tising support. One thing they con- 
tinue to like is the radio side. They 
tell me their customers comment on it. 
'That was a smart plug you had on 
WXYZ this morning,' they'll say. 
Everybody's a critic. But that's all 
right; we like it. We don't ever get 
such nice remarks about our print 
ads." 

Besides its own branch offices 
( there are two others in Pittsburgh 
and Cincinnati) Mosler sells through 
about 5,000 dealer salesmen from 
coast to coast. A number of retailers 
use local radio in their own advertis- 
ing and nearly every week Littlehale 
gets requests from them for cuttings of 
the manufacturer's announcements. 
These are sent free, along with other 
dealer aids made available by the com- 
pany and listed in its trade advertising. 

What makes the Mosler campaign 
even more noteworthy is the fact that 

• ••••••• 

"We have a great country for optim- 
ists but it's rough on pessimists. Our 
competitive system offers wide oppor- 
tunity — it will handsomely reward the 
skillful and efficient who have a genu- 
ine and sincere appreciation of the 
consumers interests, or it can cruelly 
punish the incompetent, inefficient or 
insincere. But the consumer has clearly 
indicated his desires. He sees nothing 
but blue skies ahead. He wants to buy 
. . . and he's loaded. Let's not sell him 
short." 

ROBERT A. SEIDEL 
Executive V.P., Consumer Products 

R.C.A. 
*••••••• 

it's extraordinary for an office equip- 
ment manufacturer to use air media. 
The nature of the products, it is be- 
lieved, requires specialized selling 
backed by rather technical advertising. 
Slower-paced print advertising comes 
closer to providing the necessary for- 
mat. But even here, compared with 
other consumer product categories, 
there's much less preselling of the con- 
sumer. Proportionately, such manu- 
facturers put much more of their ad 
budget into the trade press. 

Mosler itself bypassed radio for 
years for the simple reason that, with 
existing production capacity, the com- 
pany got enough ad support via its 
basic 70% -business-magazine, 30%- 
newspaper formula. In June 1954 that 
laissez-faire attitude was dropped in 



FIRST IN HOUSTON 

with 17 out of 20* 
top nighttime shows 

OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER 



1. George Gobel 



2. 


Hit Parade KPRC-TV 




3. 


Robert Montgomery KPRC-TV 




4. 


Medic KPRC-TV 





5. $64,000 Question Station C 



6. 


Lux Video Theatre 


KPRC-TV 




7. 


Waterfront 


KPRC-TV 




8. 


Truth or Consequences KPRC-TV 




9. 


Life of Riley 


KPRC-TV 




10. 


Great Gildersleeve 


KPRC-TV 




11. 


This Is Your Life 


KPRC-TV 




12. 


Disneyland 


Station B 




13. 


Father Knows Best 


KPRC-TV 




14. 


People Are Funny 


KPRC-TV 




15. 


Fireside Theatre 


KPRCTV 








16. 


Caesar's Hour 


KPRC-TV 


<9«H B^ 


17. 


Ford Theatre 


KPRC-TV 




18. 


Perry Como 


KPRC-TV 




19. 


City Detective 


KPRC-TV 





20 WyattEarp 



Station B 



ARB — October, November, 1955 

KPRC-TV 

HOUSTON • CHANNEL 2 



JACK HARRIS Nationally Represented By 

Vice President & General Manager EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



order to provide a sales hypo, espe- 
cially in branch office cities, and, as 
noted, radio was added. Now the bud- 
get breaks down like this: 60% busi- 
ness magazines, 20^ newspapers, 
20% radio. Nations Business, Time, 
U. S. News & World Report, and the 
New Yorker are used year-round. 
Occasional insertions go into National 
Geographic, Business Week, Fortune, 
Neivsweek, and Duns Review & Mod- 
ern Industry. At the moment, empha- 
sis is on national support as a change 
of pace, so radio has been temporarily 
suspended. But, says Littlehale. "We'll 
go back to radio." 

Other office equipment manufactur- 
ers who have heard Mosler's radio an- 
nouncements have called to ask how 
successful the campaign has been, and 
for other pertinent information, pre- 
sumably with a view toward consider- 
ing trying radio themselves. 

Others, however, may not find it as 
logical as Mosler does to chalk off a 
large portion of its ad expenditure to 
promoting the industry as a whole. 
Mosler does because it is, to a large 
degree, the industry. In the estimated 
$100-million office safe field alone. 
Mosler accounts for the lion's share, 
especially when you add bank vaults, 



too. That's probably twice as much 
as its nearest competitor. The remain- 
ing business is shared by more than 
a dozen brands. 

Edwin H. Jr. and John, president 
and executive vice president respective- 
ly, represent the fourth generation of 
the family in the business. The com- 
pany, founded in Cincinnati in 1848 
by Gustav Mosler, a German immi- 
grant, now has plants in Hamilton, 
Ohio; Covington, Ky.; and New York. 
During the war it made gun turrets, 
rocket launchers, breech-loading mor- 
tars, portable gun mounts for jungle 
warfare, armor plate for airplanes. It 
also built the cyclatrons at M.I.T. and 
the Carnegie Institute of Washington, 
showing more Mosler ingenuity. 

Since the war the firm has tripled 
its annual gross income. * * * 



COLOR TV 

(Continued from page 35) 

with both feet — as beautiful trade ads 
will attest — but the station put equal 
weight on both of them. On one was 
the color programing, both from the 
network (NBC) and local sources; 
the other was the WDSU-TV spon- 



SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA'S PlOHWl RADIO STATION 




PACKAGE 
BUYER? 

Use WDBJ's 6-13-21 Plan! 



6 minutes weekly 
13 minutes weekly 
21 minutes weekly 



Class "A" Class "B" 

$ 63.00 $ 45.00 



117.00 
168.00 



78.00 
115.00 



Ask Free & Peters! 



Established 1924 ■ CBS Since 1929 
AM . 5000 WATTS • 960 KC 
FM . 41.000 WATTS • 94.9 MC 



ROANOKE, VA. 

Owned and Operated by the TIMES-WORLD CORPORATION 
FREE & PETERS. INC., National Representatives 



130 



sored Color Clinic to assure the proper 
use of color television by advertisers. 

Prior to the debut of the clinic, 
WDSU-TV had the network people in 
to detail what they had learned about 
color. They demonstrated proper pro- 
duction, special effects, scenery, light- 
ing and make-up to the staff. Then 
followed an intensive schedule of 
weekly color clinics for advertisers. 

Each clinic has been conducted for 
the exclusive use of one advertiser 
and includes demonstrations of color 
film, color slides and live commercials 
of the clients products. Part of the 
show is a routine production with en- 
tertainment numbers demonstrating 
the general adaptability of color to 
fruits, canned products, fabric, pack- 
aged goods and, say, jewelry. The 
remainder of the session is designed 
to show the client's products in vari- 
ous settings and use under different 
lighting and other controlled condi- 
tions. The clinics are usually held in 
one afternoon to include a question- 
and-answer period. 

The clinic may be relatively short. 
But not so the planning and work 
that goes on behind the scenes. One, 
produced for the Fitzgerald Agency 
and its client, the Maison Blanche de- 
partment store, consumed a total of 
1,790 man hours in preparation, re- 
hearsal and presentation. 

One thing the clinics (so far nearly 
20 have been held) nailed down was 
that color telecasting is tricky. When 
color telecasting puts on its commer- 
cial long pants, a client or agency 
can't race into the station a few min- 
utes before the break and plunk down 
a wildly designed package and ex- 
pect it to reproduce in all its colored 
beauty. It probably won't. And when 
the blues become reds and the green 
fades into the white, the housewife 
searching for the same package on 
supermarket shelf will be a dismal 
spectre trying to match what she has 
seen by what she is seeing. It's not 
hard to imagine what effect this might 
have on sales. 

Out of the welter of information 
that came forth in the clinics as one 
product after another was diagnosed 
for potential color ills, WDSU-TV 
came to some important conclusions 
concerning the use of color in com- 
mercial presentations. If followed 
they will keep the colors under con- 
trol and make a client's product a 
dazzling spectacle, one that doesn't 
resemble the efforts of a color blind 

SPONSOR 



cubist from the Left Bank. 

1. All subjects must be completely 
checked out before going on the air. 

2. Color telecasting requires more 
preparation and rehearsal, hence more 
time. 

3. Better results with backgrounds 
of fabric rather than paper since the 
fabric is less reflective and colors do 
not "bounce" around. 

4. Packages on color tv are at their 
best when the distinctive colors are 
large areas and well defined. Lines, 
dots, half-tone effects and even small 
polka-dot effects cause difficulty and 
cannot be accurately reproduced. 

5. It is best to avoid primary addi- 
tives adjacent to one another, and par- 
ticularly to avoid the use of pure 
white, especially when there is an 
overprint of black or a darker color. 

6. Lighting is critical in color tele- 
casting, requiring meticulous placing 
and constant checking of the complete 
area to be used. A constant intensity 
of light is important to hold the color 
of set and products. 

7. Flat packages are easier to light 
than round packages. Packages of 
transparent nature and packages con- 
taining liquids are most difficult to 
light because of their reflectiveness. 

8. Backgrounds play an important 
role in color tv. Blue is an ideal 
background for product display. Black 
is also good because of its absence of 
color. White is difficult to handle but 
if used with light-colored objects, can 
be utilized. 

WDSU-TV officials said that the 
color clinics, in addition to the con- 
crete help they have given, and the 
great impact they have had on client- 
agency-station relationship, have 
brought out these important, never-to- 
be forgotten points: 

For stations: Color isn't easy. Cer- 
tain rules have to be set and adhered 
to. Personnel must be thoroughly 
trained. More thought has to be given 
to display activity. More care has to 



I . . . BURGERMEISTER BEER USES | 




be exercised than in black-and-white 
tv. More time has to be allowed. 
More ingenuity needed on part of 
personnel. 

For clients: Packaging must be ana- 
lyzed in light of color tv exposure. 
Design must take into consideration 
the problems of color tv. Impact of 
particular colors, favorites of people, 
must be a rule in design. Care exer- 
cised in future planning for new prod- 
ucts. Color tv will be highly com- 
mercial in near future. 

For agencies: More time allowed to 
stations for preparation of products 
to be used on color tv. Closer liaison 
with stations concerning their ability 
to make best use of color facilities. 
Greater thought given to backgrounds 
and allied items for product display. 
Discrimination in the selection of 
items to be shown in color. 

The following agencies in the New 
Orleans area have participated in the 
WDSU-TV Color Clinics: Fitzgerald 
Advertising Agency, Inc.; Bauerlein 
Inc.; Aubrey Williams Advertising, 
Inc.; Tracy-Locke Co., Inc. and the 
Walker Saussy Inc. 

Clients participating in the clinics 
have been: Wesson Oil Co., Blue 
Plate Foods, Godchaux Sugar, Jack- 
son Brewing Co., Fulton Bag Co., 
Maison Blanche. American Brewing 
Co., Louisiana State Rice, Dixie 
Brewing Co., Gold Seal Creamery, 
King Cotton Products, Brown's Velvet 
Dairy, Interstate Electric Co., Hibernia 
Homestead Association, New Orleans 
Public Service, Inc., Luzianne Coffee 
Co., LuAnn Products and the Wembly 
Tie Co. 



$100 MILLION IN FILM 

[Continued from page 31) 

Columbia films to replace the "tired"' 
films now being replayed but he add- 
ed that many stations have long-term 
commitments with syndicators for 
currently-running feature film, and it 
would not be economic for them to 
invest in new programing under 
those conditions. 

Privately, syndicators agree with 
this analysis up to a point. But they 
feel there will be some squeeze on 
half-hour shows and see a need for 
strong programing to offset it. Ralph 
Cohn. Columbia Picture's vice presi- 
dent in charge of Screen Gems, who 
is in the middle of this, what with 
Screen Gems planning to distribute 



KPRC-TV 

FIRST IN HOUSTON 

with 17 out of 20* 
top nighttime shows 

OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER 



1. George Gobel 



KPRCTV 



2. 


Hit Parade 




KPRCTV 


• ". 


3. 


Robert Montgorr 


ery 


KPRC-TV 




4. 


Medic 




KPRCTV 





5. $64,000 Question Station C 



6. Lux Video Theatre KPRC-TV 



7. Waterfront 



KPRC-TV 




8. Truth or Consequences KPRC-TV 

IINIIIIIMIIilll 

9. Life of Riley KPRC 
10. Great Gildersleeve KPRC-TV 



1C TV 

mmmmmMm 



11. This Is Your Life KPRC-TV 



12. Disneyland 



Station B 



13. Father Knows Best KPRC-TV 





14. People Are Funny KPRC-TV 



15. Fireside Theatre KPRC 




16. Caesar's Hour KPRC-TV 



17. Ford Theatre 



18. Perry Como 



KPRC-TV 



KPRC-TV 




19. City Detective KPRC-TV 




20. Wyatt Earp 



Station B 



23 JANUARY 1956 



* ARB - October, November, 1955 

KPRC-TV 

HOUSTON • CHANNEL 2 



JACK HARRIS Nationally Represented By 

Vice President & General Manager EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



KCEN-TVO 

DOMINATES 

WACO -TEMPLE 

BILLION DOLLAR MARKET 

Audience ^% J^ttl 1* 

oO/o 



Preference 



*Telepuhe — June, 1955, rated KCEN-TV 
first ;'n 356 of 4? 1 quarter flours on rhe air. 

Advertisers nafura//y prefer the big audi- 
ences — the big audiences naturally prefer 
KCEN-TV — the 100,000 watt, NBC Intercon- 
nected station naturally covering its 17,000 
square mile service area. . . . (Tallest tower in 
Central Texas.) 

KCEN-TV 



Safes Offices: 

Professional Building 
Waco, Texas 



General Offices: 

Postoffice Box 188 
Temple, Texas 

Studios and Transmitter at 

Eddy, Texas 
(Between Temple and Waco) 

Representatives: 

National: Texas: 

George P. Hollingbery Clyde Melville Compony 

Company 



Melba Building, Dallas 




$24 millions are spent annu- 
ally by the Negro population 
in the Shreveport Market 
Area.* 

Are you getting your share? 

You Can With KANV 

the all Negro air personnel 

station. 

Last Fall 77 advertisers renewed 

and increased program schedules . 

They knew they were getting their 

share and will continue to get it. 

Contact a KANV Rep. soon. 
He'll show you how to get 
your rightful share of this 
better-than-average Negro market. 

*U.S. Census Bureau 



KANV 



1050 Kc. 
250 Watts 
DAYTIME 



SHREVEPORT, LOUISIANA 



104 feature films and increase syndi- 
cating, too, told SPONSOR that time 
for half-hour syndicated film may 
shrink. He added, however, he is 
hopeful that increasing amounts of 
feature film will reduce station de- 
pendence on network programing and 
thus help the entire syndication busi- 
ness. 

A glance at what stations have been 
doing doesn't shed much light on the 
feature film vs. half-hour syndication 
argument. There are cases where 
stations have moved feature films out 
of the way for half-hour syndicated 
shows and improved their ratings 
thereby. On the other hand feature 
films are running successfully on other 
times besides early and late evening. 
A number of stations run feature films 
during the morning and afternoon and 
have copped major audience shares. 
Probably the safest thing to say is 
that it depends on the show. 

Regarding the daytime picture in 
general, Hal Roach, Jr., whose studios 
produced some 310 half-hours for tv 
in 1955, sees stations leaning heavily 
on fresh film product during the day 
and predicts that daytime will "revert 
to almost exclusive film use." Despite 
predictions of their demise, Roach will 
continue producing situation comedies. 
Roach, incidentally, has more than $13 
million worth of tv film production 
contracted. 

Another burning question is whether 
the RKO and Columbia releases will 
force other major studios to release 
some or all of their backlog. It is 
significant that the Columbia an- 
nouncement regarding its 104 features 
followed hard on the heels of the 
RKO sale. Columbia had previously 
had plans to release only 13 of its 
films. Trade talk has it that Matthew 
Fox, major stockholder in C & C 
Super and the central figure in its 
purchase of RKO films from General 
Teleradio, is offering the films on a 
perpetual lease to stations. This 
would tend to block sales by other 
feature film distributors since a sta- 
tion, once it had total rerun rights to 
a picture, would make wide use of it. 

Whatever Columbia's reaction, how- 
ever, indications are that the other 
studios will move slowly. In the 
first place, there is only so much fea- 
ture film the tv industry can absorb 
at one time and some Hollywood 
executives professed relief that the 
pressure was off them to sell film 



backlog to tv following the RKO and 
Columbia deals. lhen, too, though 
movie exhibitors are anti-fee tv to a 
man, some studios are still tantalized 
by the potential profits they may rake 
in by replaying old films to subscrip- 
tion tv audiences. Releasing films now 
would kill chances of running them 
again for a price to the audience. 

While feature films may cause the 
distributor of made-for-tv film some 
worry he can look ahead, on the other 
hand, to an increasing foreign market. 
As yet it is only a small part of his 
billings, but 1955 saw the greatest 
activity of any year in both sales 
and the setting up of international 
sales organizations. The advent of 
commercial tv in England was a boon 
to the U.S. distributor. Since the 



"There will be a growth of television 
broadcasting in smaller market areas. 
Sixty-five new tv stations are expected to 
go on the air in 1956, bringing the total 
to 535. More than half of these will be 
able to transmit color. The swing to 
color will proceed steadily as new ad- 
vances are made in color reception. Re- 
tail sales of color receivers should total 
150,000 in 1956.« 

DR. W. R. G. BAKER 

V.p., General Electric and 

Gen. Mgr., G-E Electronics Div. 

Syracuse, N. Y. 



middle of 1955 Official alone has made 
sales of $500,000. The firm unloaded 
500 half-hours in eight series. CBS 
Film Sales also sold eight shows. Ziv 
is reported getting $10-15,000 a week 
from the English market. 

While the English-speaking markets 
like Canada and England will remain 
the biggest chunk of the distributor's 
foreign potential, the distributor is 
not overlooking the foreign-language 
market abroad. Ziv had dubbed near- 
ly 750 half-hour episodes in Spanish, 
French, German and Italian and is 
contemplating doing the Scandanavian 



INDUSTRIAL HEART 
OF THE TRI-STATE AREA 

7V* Tie* 2«ee*t 

\\\ i l/y 







316,000 watts ot V. H. F. power 

WHTN-TV b a a bT 

Greater Huntington Theatre Corp. 

Huntington, W. Va. Huntington 3-0185 



132 



SPONSOR 



tongues and Japanese. Official is sell- 
ing in Latin America, Japan and the 
Near East. Screen Gems has even in- 
vestigated the attitude of the U.S. 
State Department toward sales to Iron 
Curtain countries, has sold a show 
in Thailand to Pepsi Cola for viewing 
in Bangkok. 

Along with this expansion into 
world-wide sales is overseas produc- 
tion. Guild, which has already sold 
Liberace in England and is planning 
to push three other shows in that 
country (The Frankie Laine Show, 1 
Spy and Life with Elizabeth — except 
that the latter show won't use the 
name "Elizabeth" in the title for ob- 
vious reasons) is also going to nego- 
tiate a co-production deal there for a 
show with an English background. 
Similar plans are in the works for 
Italy and Germany. Screen Gems 
has already worked out an English 
co-production deal for an Ivanhoe 
series. Official owns 25% of Nettle- 
fold Studios in England. This is the 
studio which produced Robin Hood 
for U.S., English and Canadian tv re- 
lease. Now being shot for tv there 
are Buccaneer and A Knight of the 
Round Table. Official is also involved 
in the shooting of Captain Rogers of 
Her Majesty's Navy in England. 

I hough billings from markets out- 
side the U.S. are comparatively small, 
in the future they can only go up as 
tv expands overseas. George Shupert, 
head of ABC Film Syndication, pre- 
dicts that by 1957, a distributor will 
be able to figure on from 20 to 25% 
income for each show from outside- 
of-U.S. markets. And that, he said, 
is conservative. So far as the U.S. 
advertiser is concerned, this means 
higher budgets for syndicated shows 
— in other words, shows which will 
be able to compete better with net- 
work programs. 

Another side of the picture is the 
purchase of tv films overseas by U.S. 



PULSE Proves 




Wilkes-Barre 
Pernio. 

the front-running radio station 
reaching more than a Quarter Mil- 
lion radio homes. 

Call Avery-Knodel, Inc. 



23 JANUARY 1956 



advertisers with foreign subsidiaries. 
There is already a great deal of this 
in Canada but firms such as Procter 
& Gamble, Sears, Roebuck, General 
Motors, Westinghouse, Standard 
Brands, Richard Huclnut, American 
1 obacco and National Biscuit are al- 
ready using dubbed-in soundtracks — 
or revoking as it is sometimes called 
— for syndicated film in Europe and 
Latin America. 

With his business growing, the syn- 
dicator has been becoming bolder in 
his programing plans and has been 
becoming more active in making 
pitches for network business. While 
the syndicator is basically on the spot, 
as opposed to network side of the 
fence, network sales offer him prestige, 
a comparatively uncomplicated sales 
deal and a quick profit, though it is 
not always as big a profit as syndica- 
tion might bring over the long haul. 

Up to now the syndicator has of- 
fered half-hour shows. As a matter 
of fact, the terms "half-hour"* and 
"syndication" are almost interchange- 
able. In 1956, however, some syndi- 
cators are making plans for com- 
peting with the networks on the lat- 
ter's home ground, namely, the long 
show, and, especially, the 90-minute 
variety. Two distributors have al- 
ready made plans for film "spectacu- 
lars." Screen Gems and NTA. 

Screen Gems expects more time 
available for 90-minute shows on the 
networks next season. It also feels 
it can add something to 90-minute 
programing. John Mitchell, sales 
chief of Screen Gems, told a recent 
press conference that the live 90-min- 
ute show needs "sprucing up." He 
said the firm has studied 90-minute 
show ratings and came to the conclu- 
sion that shows built around one or 
two stars cannot sustain audience in- 
terest in the long run. What the 90- 
minute show needs, Mitchell stated, 
is a good story. The future of the 
spectaculars, he said, lies in the 
dramatic form. 

The Screen Gems stories for the 90- 
niinute shows will come from three 
sources: 1. unproduced properties of 
Columbia Pictures; 2. original stories; 
3. possibly a remake of a Columbia 
movie. In the first category are 
Tories by George S. Kaufman, Moss 
Hart, James Hilton, Maxwell Ander- 
son, Edna Ferber, Louis Bromfield. 
Lloyd C. Douglas and Kathleeen 
Norris. anions some others. 



FIRST IN HOUSTON 

with 17 out of 20* 
top nighttime shows 

OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER 



1. George Gobel 



2. HitParade 



KPRCTV 



KPRCTV 



3. Robert Montgomery KPRCTV 



4. Medic 


KPRCTV 




5. $64,000 Question 


Station C 




6. Lux Video Theatre 


KPRCTV 




7. Waterfront 


KPRCTV 




8. Truth or Consequences KPRCTV 




9. Life of Riley 


KPRCTV 




10. Great Gildersleeve 


KPRCTV 





11. This Is Your Life KPRCTV 



12. Disneyland 



Station B 



13. 


Father Knows Best 


KPRCTV 




14. 


People Are Funny 


KPRCTV 


. . SBSSfe^ 


15. 


Fireside Theatre 


KPRCTV 




16. 


Caesar's Hour 


KPRCTV 




17. 


Ford Theatre 


KPRCTV 




18. 


Perry Como 


KPRCTV 




19. 


City Detective 


KPRCTV 





20. Wyatt Earp Station B 



* ARB — October, November, 1955 

KPRCTV 

HOUSTON • CHANNEL 2 

JACK HARRIS Nationally Represented By 

Vice President & General Manager EDWARD PETRY & CO. 



IN EVANSVILLE INDIANA 
WISE 
BUYERS 
CHOOSE 




Now Available — 

PARTICIPATIONS in the 

HOOSIER JAMBOREE 

5:00 to 6:00 P.M. 

Monday thru Friday 

"Live Western Music Show" 

with PROVEN SALES RESULTS 

ASK 

MEEKER TV, INC. —ADAM YOUNG 
St. Louis 




NOW OPERATING 
WFOA— CBS RADIO 



ROCHESTER 
N.Y. 



WHERE THERE 
IS A 

WILL 

THERE 15 
A WAY! 




J 



s4»ut tHe 

utita . . . 

"WILL'moyle 

Leading deejays today across the coun- 
try include WILL MOYLE, WVET 
Rochester . . . refreshingly different." 
BILLBOARD said it and we're glad — 
and your client will be glad, too, with 
results the Will Moyle way on WVET, 
che "Independent" Network station. 

5000 WATTS 
280 KC 




Honored by 
Stan Kenton's 
recording— 
"ACCORDING 
TO MOYLE" 



IN ROCHESTER, N. Y. 



Represenfed Nationally by 
THE BOLLING COMPANY 



NTA's pians ior 60-minute and 90- 
minute shows comes as a surprise in 
view of its recent feature film acqui- 
sitions. In quick succession NTA 
bought 11 David O. Selznick films fol- 
lowed by a group of 30 feature films, 
including 10 from Italian Film Export 
and others from Universal-Internation- 
al and United Artists. It was also an- 
nounced that NTA hopes to get 
another 40 films from a "major Holly- 
wood production company." 

The reason apparently is that NTA, 
like other distributors, does not want 
to remain neck deep in one field. The 
firm's current sales are all on the 
syndicated level with feature films (it 
now owns 285) accounting for 75% 
of its income. It is now setting up 
plans for what it calls a "fall sample 
line" of shows for national sale. The 
NTA national sales department ex- 
pects to have a half dozen shows for 
national advertisers and will invest 
about $500,000 in pilots. Among these 
will be one 60-minute and one 90- 
minute show. 

Guild quietly provided another sur- 
prise along this line when it an- 
nounced this month the first full-hour 
children's show in syndication. Pop- 
corn Theater. Tailored specifically for 
the grocery trade, the initial sale was 
Independent Grocer's Association. 
The show features a Poppo the Clown 
character and there are various mer- 
chandising aids built around him. 

In describing the show as contain- 
ing a built-in mechandising cam- 
paign (the Poppo character), Guild 
was following a traditional path in 
syndication. For merchandising and 
syndication have long gone hand in 
hand. The year 1955 did not disclose 
any startling changes in merchandis- 
ing methods but there are evident 
trends in the business. 

For one thing, syndicators have 
become wary of the pitfalls in supply- 
ing merchandising aids. In the early 
days, such aids were considered 
money-makers for the syndicators in 
addition to being sales aids to the 
sponsors. Because money could only 
be made if these aids were made or 
printed in quantity, they were. But 
sponsors sometimes wouldn't buy and 
the syndicator was nicked. 

Syndicators have become more hep 
and sophisticated about merchandis- 
ing and they no longer wrap up their 
merchandising advice by telling the 
client to buy a lot of merchandising 



aids and let it go at that. 

"We are not peddlers of point-of- 
sale material," Walter Scanlon, mer- 
chandising manager at CBS Film 
Sales, told SPONSOR. "We counsel, we 
do not sell material." 

Scanlon said the small advertiser 
frequently needs expert advice in mer- 
chandising because he usually cannot 
afford a merchandising expert of his 
own. This is especially true when it 
comes to tailoring a merchandising 
campaign which will be effective and 
which will fit the budget of the adver- 
tiser, Scanlon added. 

All this does not mean that mer- 
chandising is considered less impor- 
tant that before. Far from it. Mer- 
chandising is probably used more 
than ever but, like many aspects of the 
film distribution, there is more of an 
air of maturity about it. * * * 



ROUND-UP 

(Continued from page 118) 

and wearing apparel in addition to 
meeting the other musical stars present 
for the evening. These included 
George Shearing, T-Bone Walker and 
Ruth Brown. 

The prize winner was chosen "the 
most outstanding Negro girl as to at- 
tractiveness and personality ... to 
meet the public and represent the 
station. " * * * 

Plan 26-mile marathon 
between Maryland stations 

The facilities of modern America 
will be used to aid the revival of an 
ancient Greece sport in March when a 




"I'm so glad we ran out of gas, 
Charles — now we can listen to 
something romantic on KRIZ 
Phoenix." 

SPONSOR 



26-mile marathon will be run in Mary- 
land. The distance is the same between 
WNAV, Annapolis and WITH. Balti- 
more as was the distance between the 
old Greek cities of Marathon and Ath- 
ens, the site of the original run. 

Though the term was made famous 
when a Greek runner raced the dis- 
tance to inform Athenians of a great 
military victory, this current marathon 
will be used to raise funds for the 
American Team in the Olympic Games 
later this year. The honorary chair- 
men of the sponsoring committee are 
Governor Theodore R. McKeldin. 
Baltimore Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro 
and WITH President Thomas Tinsley. 
Staging the event are: R. C. Embry, 
WITH v.p.; Chauncey Ashley; John 
Marshall Boone, Maryland State Ath- 
letic Commission Chairman. * * * 

Briefly . . . 

Storyboard, Inc. has signed a $100,- 
000 contract with the Calkins & Holden 
agency to create a cartoon spot series, 
Mr. Stokely Van Camp. The cam- 
paign features 18 commercials, nine 
20-seconds and nine one-minute films. 

Other tv campaigns done by Story- 
board include the Bank of America's 
"Little Man" and Ford's "Doctor." 
* * * 

A new late-night radio offering on 
WIBC, Philadelphia is McMahon 
About Town. Ed McMahon, one of the 
better known local tv personalities, 
conducts interviews in odd places 
around town from midnight to 2:00 
a.m. Such off-beat locations as ma- 
ternity waiting rooms, police courts, 
basketball dressing rooms at half time, 
jazz joints, and dime-a-dance halls 
have been used. 

Some of the sponsors who have al- 
ready taken time on the show include 
Wynn's Friction Proofing, Mathew 
Slap Buick Dealer, Al Berman Cloth- 
ing, the Sealy Mattress Co., and Or- 
satti's Pump Room. The first show 
was broadcast from the latter spon- 
sor's restaurant, where a dinner was 
held for agency and sponsor repre- 
sentatives to toast the new show. 




The first communications industry 
man to be named "Louisville's Man 
of the Year" is WAVE President 
George W. Norton, Jr. The award for 
the year 1955-56, is given by the Ad- 
vertising Club of Louisville "not to 
mark some specific deed or one-year 
effort, but to call attention to the con- 
tinuing community service of an out- 
standing citizen." 

The recipient has been the owner of 
WAVE since 1933, and active in many 
industry affairs. He has been a direc- 
tor of the NARTB for several terms, 
on the policy sub-committee of the 
NBC Affiliates Committee and was in- 
strumental in the formation of Broad- 
cast Music Inc. In addition, he is ac- 
tive in local charity drives including 
the Community Chest and American 

Red Cross. 

« * * 

James Aubrey Jr., General Manager 
of KNXT-TV, Hollywood, Calif, and 
creator of Focus on Delinquency has 
announced that in the future his sta- 
tion will produce kinescopes of other 
public service shows to meet antici- 
pated requests from civic and govern- 
ment groups. The six-part delinquen- 
cy series, concluded 30 August, re- 
ceived a Sylvania Award as the coun- 



try's "best local service series" and a 
commendation from the Los Angeles 
City Council. 

* * # 

Congratulations are in order for 
Arch McDonald, Washington, D. C. 
baseball announcer for WTOP radio 
who has just about completed his first 
25 years in radio. In addition to his 
sportscasting role Arch is Director of 
Sports for WTOP. He's racked up 
quite a list of sponsors during his years 
on radio including Coca-Cola, B. C. 
Remedy Co., National Brewing Co., 
Chesterfield Cigarettes, Gunther Brew- 
ing Co. and Old Gold Cigarettes. 

* * * 

A giant step toward bringing wide- 
ly disparate markets and merchandis- 
ers together simultaneously will be at- 
tained by a coast-to-coast closed cir- 
cuit television network created by 
Sheraton Closed Circuit TV, Inc. Start- 
ing 1 February with fifty hotels the 
network plans to double the coverage 
by June. William P. Rosensohn execu- 
tive vice-president of the company has 
reported that orders for color projec- 
tion equipment have been placed with 
RCA whose compatible color system is 
being used. * * * 



r 



AT THE CENTER M. OF CONVENIENCE 







home 

of the 

famous 

Hawaiian 

Room 



Lexington Avenue 
at 48th Street 



23 JANUARY 1956 



135 



GET BEST 

COVERAGE IN 
BOTH 

COLORADO SPRINGS 
AND PUEBLO . . . 



mt 



CHANNEL 11 

Transmitter atop Cheyenne 
mountain, ONE MILE above 
market area. 

126,000 families equals 

America's 108th market. 

o 

\ CBS and ABC 

k f ° r 

Pueblo, Colorado -Springs 
I and Southern Colorado 



THE BOILING CO., INC. 

Southern: Clarke Brown Co. 




Choose 

WHBF 

as a major aid 

to your Quad-City 

marketing plans 

in 1956 





ii alwton 








Charles Revson, president of Revlon Inc., gave 
Madison Ave. another jolt when he announced the 
cosmetic company had moved out of Norman, 
Craig & Kummel and into BBDO. The former 
agency had selected and developed the hit show, 
$64,000 Question, for Revlon. The $7 million ac- 
count moved the lipstick, nail polish, eye makeup, 
liquid rouge and manicuring products to BBDO, 
effective 1 February. Both $64,000 Question and 
Appointment with Adventure will be supervised by 
BBDO and the C. J. LaRoche agencies. 



Robert M. Ganger, chairman of the board of 
D'Arcy, announced the acquisition of the nearly 
$8 million Packard, Clipper account. The new 
billing will arrive 1 April, the day after the $15 
million Coca-Cola account moves to McCann-Erickson 
and will fill about half the void left by Coke. The 
cars drive out of Ruthrauff & Ryan, who garaged 
them for 15 months. Tv Reader's Digest (Mon., 
for ABC TV, 8-8:30 p.m.) carries the network tv load 
for the autos, which have separate copy themes. 
Packard is the luxury line, Clipper the medium 
price contender. 



Richard E. Forbes has been named to fill the 
new post of director of advertising and sales 
promotion on the central sales staff of Chrysler 
Corp. He will have general supervision of all corpo- 
ration advertising and sales promotion as well as 
coordinating the advertising and sales promotion 
activities of the division staffs. Chrysler programs 
on all three tv networks: It's a Great Life (Sun., 
NBC TV, 7-7:30 p.m.) ; Break the Bank (Wed., 
ABC TV 9:30-10 p.m.) ; Climax (Thur., CBS TV, 
8:30-9:30 p.m., three weeks in four) ; Shower of 
Stars (alternates with Climax). 



William A. MaeDonough has been named 
vice president of Crosley and Bendix Home 
Applicance Divisions of AVCO Manufacturing Corp. 
He retains his post of director of advertising and 
sales promotion, in which capacity he announced 
plans for a $6 million ad plunge. The money 
is to be spent between now and 31 May 1956, much 
of the money going to the co-sponsorship by the 
two divisions of one- third of the NBC Comedy Hour 
each week (Sun., NBC TV, 8-9 p.m.). The rest 
of the money will be split between other national 
and local advertising. 



136 



SPONSOR 




EDWIN K. WHEELER 

(General Manager) 
WWJ and WWJ-TV 



LIKE MOST 
'Newsworthy" 

BROADCASTING 

EXECUTIVES 
Mr. Wheeler's 
LATEST 
BUSINESS 
PORTRAIT 
IS BY... 



Photographers to the Business Executive 
565 Fifth Avenue, New York 17— PL 3-1882 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 



ABC Film 53 

ABC TV Network 123 

Aveiy-Knodel, Inc. .. 102, 124 

Air Trails Group - 137 

John Blair & Co - 109 

Broadcast Music, Inc 137 

Channel 10, Rochester 70 

CBS Radio Network 8-9 

CBS TV Film 71-7T. 

Eastman Kodak, Inc. — 64-65 

Guild Films 54-55 

Interstate TV 82 

Hotel Lexington 13a 

McClatchy Broadcasting 15 

Mid-Ccntinent Group 16 

NBC Film ... 60-61 

NBC Spot Sales _. 26-27 

IK 'A TV Equipment _.. - 67 

Raeburn Studios _ 137 

Hal Roach Prod. 57 

Screen Gems .. 50 

Song Ads - 62 

So. Cal. Broad. Assoc. 12 

Sponsor .... - 99-101 

Steinman Stations 3 

Storer Stations . _ 94-95 



Television Programs of America 



59 



Timebuving Basics . . 123 

U.S. Bonds 



Westinghouse Broadcasting 
ZIV-TV . 



KANV, Shreveport . 132 

KBIG, Hollywood _. 6 

KCEN-TV, Temple, Tex. 132 

KCMC-TV, Texarkana .... 7 3 

KCRA-TV, Sacramento 71 

KFAB, Omaha . .._ 122 

KGNC-TV, Amarillo ...... . 115 

KGVO-TV, Missoula, Mont. 127 

KKTV, Pueblo, Colo. .. 136 

KLZ-TV, Denver — 82 

KMBC, Kansas City __ BC 

KNUZ, Houston 105 

KOIL, Omaha 21-24 

KOOL-TV, Phoenix 79 

KPHO-TV, Phoenix IBC 

KPRC-TV, Houston ...... 127, 129, 131, 133 

KRIZ, Phoenix 129, 134 

KRLD-TV, Dallas 78 

KSLA-TV, Shreveport 66 

KSTN, Stockton, Cal. .. Ill 

KSTP, Minneapolis 10 

KTBS-TV, Shreveport 77 

KTLN, Denver 11 

KTVH, Hutchinson, Kans. 76 

KVWO, Cheyenne 128 

KWKH, Shreveport 5 

KWKW, Pasadena ........ 131 



WABT, Birmingham 87 

WAFB-TV, Baton Rouge 138 

WAVE, Louisville 113 

WBAY-TV, Green Bay 90 

WBEN-TV, Buffalo 13 

WBNS, Coloumbus, Ohio .... 106 

WBRE-TV, Wilkes-Barre ... 2S 

WBZ-TV, Boston . 121 

WCUE, Akron 128 

WDBJ, Roanoke 130 

WDIA, Memphis 117 

WEHT-TV, Henderson, Ky. 134 

WFAA-TV, Dallas 4S-49 

WFBC-TV, Greenville, S. C. 84 

WFBL, Syracuse 14 

WFMY-TV, Greensboro, N. C. 85 

WGTO, Haines City, Fla. 86 

WHBF, Rock Island, 111. 13 6 

WHBQ-TV, Memphis 63 

WHO, Des Moines 19 

WHTN-TV, Huntington, W. Va. 132 

WIBW, Topeka 126 

WICH, Norwich, Conn. 128 

WICS-TV, Springfield, 111. 20 

WIT,K. Wilkes-Barre 133 

WISH-TV, Indianapolis IFC 

WKY-TV, Oklahoma City 125 

WKZO-TV, Kalamazoo 93 

WLOL, Minneapolis H2 

WMAR-TV, Baltimore 84 

WMBR-TV, Jacksonville, Fla. 80-81 

WNDU-TV, South Bend 116 

WNHC-TV, New Haven 114 

WREX-TV, Rockford, 111. 25 

WSAZ-TV. Huntington. W. Va. 7 

WSBT-TV, South Bend, Ind. 97 

WSJS-TV, Winston-Salem 72 

WSOK, Nashville 13 5 

WSRS, Cleveland HI 

WTRF-TV, Wheeling 83 

WVET, Rochester — . 134 

WXEX-TV, Richmond FC 




BMI 



"Milestones" for 
February: 
BMI's series of program 
continuities, entitled "Mile- 
stones," focuses the spot- 
light on important events 
and problems which have 
shaped the American scene. 
February's release features 
four complete half-hour 
shows — ready for immedi- 
ate use — smooth, well writ- 
ten scripts for a variety ot 

uses* 

"MALICE TOWARD NONE" 

Abraham Lincoln 

Born: February 12, 1809 

"OPERATION: MY BROTHER'S 

KEEPER" 

Crusade For Freedom— Freedom 

Week 

February 12-22, 1956 

"GREAT MUSIC UNITES US" 

National Brotherhood Week 

February 19-26, 1956 

"WASHINGTON'S HOUR OF 

DECISION" 

George Washington 

Born: February 22, 1732 

"Milestones" is available for 

commercial sponsorship— see your 

local stations for details. 



BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 
TORONTO • MONTREAL 



23 JANUARY 1956 



137 



CHAMP 

WINS 

AGAIN 



by 5 to 1 margin 



WHEN IT COMES TO SALES PUNCH in 
the important Baton Rouge area, WAFB- 
TV has proved its supremacy by a country 
mile! 




In the latest Telepulse (Nov. 
1955) , WAFB-TV was first in 
347 quarter hours per week, 
compared to 78 quarter hours 
on station B . . . . giving WAFB- 
TV a leadership of nearly five 
to one. 



MONDAY TO FRIDAY 

7am-l2noon 12 noon-6 pm 



6 pm- 1 2 pm 




SATURDAY 



Stations 



ALL THIS AND MERCHAN- 
DISING TOO! Take over- 
whelming viewer preference, as 
demonstrated by this survey, 
and add a merchandising record 
that's second to none; (1) First place win- 
ner in recent "Lucy Show" competition 
with a double first prize for special mer- 
chandising job, (2) First place in Screen 
Gems, Inc. contest on program promotion, 
(3) Among top four in "Frank Leahy and 
His Football Forecasts", and you've got a 
sales potential that can't be beat. Wouldn't 
you like to put "The Champ" to work for 
you? 



138 



WAFB-TV 

Sta. B 
Sta. C 
* ''Special Alternate- 



I pm-6 pm 



6 pm- 12 pm 



SUNDAY 



12 noon-6 pm 



32 a 53 61 

**6I a 41 35a 

7 6 4 

Week Seasonal Broadcast 



6 pm-12 pm 



56 

41 

3 



a Does Not Broadcast Complete Period. Share Unadjusted. 



Call, write or wire: 

National Representative — Young Television Corp. 
South & Southwest — Clarke Brown Co. 

WAFB-TV 

CHANNEL 28 

affiliated with WAFB, AM-FM 



CBS — ABC — DUMONT 



200.000 WATTS 



SPONSOR 



Uhf station 
has fine year 



Quiz shows get 
lease 



new 



Air media in 
Detroit strike 



Some economists 
endanger nation 



FCC proposes 
"translators" 



Radio stations 
grow and grow 






REPORT TO SPONSOR for 23 January 1956 

(Continued from page 2) 

1955, a year that saw uhf stations folding the country over, was a 
record-breaking one, according to information from WVEC-TV, Norfolk, 
Va. In the year end report it was stated WVEC TV had: over com e a 
defi cit of $118,000 from 1954, increased its gross revenue by 32%, 
operated completely in black, had its contract as a basic NBC affili- 
ate renewed and made plans to proceed with a program of expansion 
and improvement. Report further stated conversion prob lem had almost 
completel y dis app eared and a steady rising volume of advertisers were 
using WVEC-TV, many diverting funds from other media to use station. 

-SR- 
Success of "$64,000 Question started new trend in quizzers now ex- 
tending into radio, and successfully. Newest sale is Radio Feature's 
"Time Test," radio quiz package placed on Don Lee Network and in 42 
other markets. High public acceptance of Revlon starrer, it's felt, 
will a id new properties in getting established. Concensus, though, 
is that quiz popularity is cyclical, like other programing, with 
advertisers benefiting if timing and vehicle is right. 

-SR- 
Detroit businessmen, without newspaper advertising for nearly 2 
months, have had good chance to take long look at air media and what 
sort of job it did for them. Concensus is that radio and tv did good 
job all things considered. Two points on other side, though: (1) 
advertisers had lean pickings when it came to availabilities and (2) 
stores lacked air media knowhow. All seemed to agree on one impor- 
tant item: Advertiser who had been using air media was way ahead 
when strike hit in that he (1) got cumulative benefit of his con- 
tinued schedule (2) was familiar with use of air media and (3) stood 
as an established advertiser in race for better availabilities. 

-SR- 
Dr. Ernest Dichter, president of the Institute for Motivational Re- 
search, warns economist s pre dict ing a sli p in b us ines s are playing 
with fire and doing a disservice to the nation. Dr. Dichter gave 
warning before merchandising session of 45th annual convention of 
National Retail Dry Goods Association meeting in New York this month. 
Instead of taking a down-at-the-mouth attitude, Dr. Dichter said, we 
should ask not whether our prosperity will last, but what we can do 
to make it last. "Fears inspired by the pessimistic approach of 
purely mechanical economists is detrimental to our welfare," he said. 

-SR- 
A method of bringing tv service to isolated areas via "translator" 
stations was proposed at 12 January FCC meeting. Each such station 
would be one of upper 14 uhf channels, would have power up to 10 
watts, and would rebroadcast regu l ar tv st at ion progra ms. They 
would operate in places where other tv stations cannot be construct- 
ed even though channels may be available. Translators might reduce 
the need for protective spacing with present low channel uhfs. 

-SR- 
Radio's prophets of doom had better take a new look. Total number 
of am stations as of 1 December 1954 was 2,650. One year later total 
was 2,808, growth of 158. Add this to tremendous sale of sets in 
•55, nearly 14 million, and radio picture, although not dazzling, 
is considerably brighter with prospects looking up. 



23 JANUARY 1956 



139 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS 



When the movie deluge hits 

The advertising medium with the 
voracious appetite, television, has 
taken the starch out of many of its 
most carping critics with programing 
imaginativeness and excellence. 

The 90-minute network spectaculars 
have contributed greatly to this, but 
so have many more network offerings, 
syndicated films, live shows at hun- 
dreds of stations, and some movies. 

But now comes the report, early in 
1956, that the year will be marked by 
the release of copious cans of film to 
be offered to stations everywhere. A 
race is on to see which studios and 
mo\ie film distributors will be first. 

First with what? 

If it's first with the best, we won't 
object. But we suspect that in more 
cases than one quality will play sec- 
ond fiddle to quantity. 

Don't get us wrong. Personally, we 
love movies. And we don't object see- 



ing an unfurrowed Clark Gable or a 
stylishly attired (for 1946) Joan Craw- 
ford on the living room screen. But 
the temptation on the part of many 
stations to seize on big packages of 
movie film at bargain prices (in com- 
parison with the cost of other tv pro- 
graming) will be almost more than 
many budget-harassed managers can 
endure. 

Too many movies can be worse than 
none at all. Especially if hidden within 
the economy packages are some which 
can be characterized as "dogs. 

We expect many good films which 
deserve rerunning and rerunning again 
to become available in 1956. We'll be 
looking for them. For the fake of 
a mountingly professional medium we 
urge that film distributors carefulh 
cull the bad apples from the basket, 
that film buyers at stations check pack- 
ages carefully before closing a deal. 
In this way everyone (and especially 
viewers and advertisers) will be well 
served. 

* * # 

Television in New York 

The fabulous Mr. Zeckendorf, who 
tosses half billion dollar building plans 
around like flapjacks, is presently mull- 
ing a center of such proportions on 40 
acres of Manhattan real estate. 

Since Mr. Zeckendorf has lately be- 
come intrigued with television (he re- 
cently purchased a substantial interest 
in KBTV, Denver and may go for the 
FCC limit) there's a good betting 
chance that tenancy of tv interests 
looms strong in the planning. 

The need for production facilities in 



New York is especially pressing. As 
John Crosby recently pointed out, 
"New York rears vertically, Los An- 
geles sprawls horizontally." And tv 
production facilities demands the hori- 
zontal. Consequently, the move to the 
west is noticeable. 

We won't take sides on New York 
vs. Los Angeles as tv headquarters. 
There are good arguments for both. 
But the need for more space and bet- 
ter facilities in New York is so ap- 
parent that if Mr. Zeckendorf doesn't 
provide the answer somebody else will. 

Just as a starter let us throw out the 
suggestion that since Grand Central 
Station is the hub of the advertising 
industry from which all tv blessings 
flow, why not build a 40- or 80-acre tv 
city 25 miles up the New York Central 
Line in Hartsdale or White Plains, or 
18 miles up the New Haven in New 
Rochelle. Traveling time: 30 to 40 
minutes. Big businesses like General 
Foods and Nestle's are doing it — why 
not television? 

The Detroit Strike 

A newspaper strike is an unhappy 
occurence in any market. The one 
just ended in Detroit after seven 
weeks (including the Christmas sea- 
son ) had at least one bright side — it 
allowed many clients and agencies to 
reevaluate all major media and use 
them. Radio and tv, not noted for 
heaw participation in department 
store, appliance store, and supermar- 
ket ad budgets, came in for increased 
use and did fine. Now that the strike 
is over the reevaluation process is 
going on stronger than ever. 



Applause 



There's been far too much said in 
the past few years on the state of 
radio. Too much, that is, on the 
negative side. It's time, we think, 
that the positive should take over and 
let a little sunshine come in. 

One rose doesn't the summer make; 
we know that, but with the excellent 
radio contracts now being let, we're 
inclined to be a little heady about the 
medium's good fortune. What has 
happened in a few short weeks may 
be a good portent of the future. 

Pepsodent led off a short while ago 



with the news that more than a mil- 
lion of its advertising dollars would 
be used on radio. Now Slenderella 
tells us they're going to spend $1,193,- 
683.92 in spot radio. And we like the 
way Slenderella nails it down to the 
penny. No cloud walking here. 

And then while it's not in the mil- 
lion dollar class of radio spending is 
the story in this issue of the Mosler 
Safe Co. and its success with radio. 
a use that showed ingenuity, quite a 
bit of daring and a well-founded belief 
in the ability of radio to deliver. 



We're not turning our back on tv 
to hand a kudo to radio. It's just 
that we feel radio's had its share of 
poor-mouthing from the prophets of 
doom. Pepjodent, Slenderella, Mos- 
ler and a host of other advertisers 
have shown and we think will con- 
tinue to show — and believe in — the 
potential of this medium. A potential 
that even in its heyday wasn't quite 
realized. Simply, we're happy about 
the situation, and sponsor applauds 
those advertisers who. each in his own 
wav. have believed in radio. 



140 



SPONSOR 




R. P r.. B „t«d by KATZ AOENCY INC. 



RADIO 

590 kc. \ Channel 6 
CBS \ CBS 

JOHN BLAIR «. CO. BIAIR TV, INC. 



MEREDITH £W& <W IdevtoHm STATIONS 

affiliated with Better Homes and Gardens ami Successful Farming magazines 



H|II 
IIIiKIi h 



he New Sound of 

KMBC-KFRM 






in the \Heart) of America 1 . 



Phi! Evans 
Farm Service Director 



Jim Leathers 
istont Farm Service Director 



^S*s j^ J 



Jim Burke 
Speciol Events Director 



Merle Harmon 

Ploy-byPlay Baseball 

K. C Athletics 



Dave Andrews 

"Dinner Bell Roundup" 



Play-by Ploy Baseball 
K. C Athletics 



Bea "Happy Home" Johnson 




Torey Souti 

"Time for Torey" 
"The Torey Southwick Shov 



CHIUICOIHE 
' ST JOSEPH 



KAN S'ZtJ'g 



M 



.TOPEKA | KANSAS CITY 



GARDEN CITY 



GREAT BEND- 



DODGE CITY 



ARKANSAS CITY 



Buckey Wall 



Half - 

daytime 
contours 



^>l 



Direclc 



Jorsey 

•RC KFRM News Bu 



These are the air personalities who put 
the KMBC-KFRM Radio Team first in 
the Heart of America. Some of the best 
known names in the Midwestern 
broadcasting world are pictured on this 
page — people who are known, respect- 
ed and followed throughout the Team's 
widespread service area. 

When you combine the talents of these 
highly successful local personalities 
with the appeal of such big ABC net- 
work names as Don McNeill, Bishop 
Sheen, Bill Stern and other national 



radio figures, it's easy to see why 
KMBC-KFRM captures such a solid 
share of the big, responsive Heart of 
America radio audience. 

There's a new sound to Kansas City 
radio ... a sound that both listeners 
and advertisers are finding more and 
more irresistable. For all the details on 
the powerful, new concept of KMBC- 
KFRM radio programming, the man 
to see is your Free & Peters Colonel. 
He will prove to you that KMBC- 
KFRM is the blue ribbon buy in a 
blue chip market! 



KMBC KFRM Nev 






Rev Mullins 



KMBC KFRM News Bureot. 



I3» ** 



**»? 



The King of Hearts" 



3S& 4£ i 



Henry Efferti B. B. Dilson iteirn remron 

Staff Announcer "The B. B. Dilson Show" Staff Announcer 



. George Higgins, Vice Pres. & Solei Mgr. 

& Gen. Mgr. Dick Smith, Director of Radio 



Frank Wiiiorde 
Producer & ! 
"Cowtown Jubilee" 



■■ 



•..■■U.ll.UlU- 




SfoM Anno- 



' WiS 



r » 



mag adio |v advertisers use 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



50 per copy« $ 8 per year 



w 



ADIO 



12 9 ON t K-JL'% I /Cjfeo 



I 



OMAHA 




ii 



SPECIAL REPORT 
ON PROGRAMING 

page 25 



CAL BILLING UP.. 
'USE UP, TOO! 

OfMBEP '55 — JANUARY '56, TOOI 

E ONLY 24 - HOUR MUSIC, NEWS 
& SPORTS STATION IN OMAHA 

5000 WATTS — FULL TIME 
ELUSIVE NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES AVERY - KNODEL, 'NC. 
N|T YORK CHICAGO LOS ANGELES SAN FRANCISCO DALLAS ATLANTA 



r.C3®0ll 



Hollywood: You can crack 
film backlog dam, 
have to know how 

page 26 

New York: Behind-the 
scene look at net program 
planning and selection 

page 28 







London: Possibilities for 
American rv advertisers 
in England 

page 31 

on't need ratings, 
says Armstrong, opposite 
'$64,000 Question' 

ge 36 



- 

IS REIGN 01 
RATINGS OVER? 





Robert Hall puts $3 



million into radio-tv 

page 40 





That's maximum power 
in the rich market of 

RICHMOND 



Petersburg and Central Virginia 






In addition to top power, WXEX-TV has maximum tower height 
— 1049 ft. above sea level; and 943 ft. above average terrain . . . 
more than 100 ft. higher than any station in this market. WXEX- 
TV is the basic NBC-TV station; and there are 415,835 TV families 
in its coverage area. Let your For joe man give you all the details 
about this great buy. 







Tom Tinsley, President Irvin G. Abeloff, Vice-President 

Represented by Forjoe & Co. 







Biow billings 
at $24 million 



Lee links fee 
tv to uhf plight 



Media money to 
launch Conqueror 






Do they recall 
your brand? 



Tv audit 
one step nearer 



Only one thing is certain as Biow Agency struggles through worst 
series of crisis ever to confront top-billing shop: Milton Biow him- 
self is fighting mad, determined to come back. Agency had $44 mil- 
lion billings in 1955 (by SPONSOR'S estimate), 68% in air media. 
With loss of $7 million Pepsi-Cola account, $9 million Philip Morris 
account, possible departure of $3 million Hudson Paper and other 
losses, agency has about $24 million left. One big question: Where's 
John Toigo, agency executive v. p., going? Officially word at press- 
time was he stays with agency for present, possibly to continue 
working on Philip Morris account till May when it moves to N. W. Ayer. 

-SR- 
Look for renewed campaigning for and against fee tv now that FCC 
Commissioner Robert E. Lee has suggested fee tv as way out for uhf 
stations. Lee feels it might take FCC 2 years to hash out fee tv 
issue for all stations, suggests uhf stations get go-ahead on fee tv 
right away to give them "leg up" in competitive scramble. He en- 
visions limit of perhaps 10% of time for fee tv with added proviso 
fee tv be barred where there is only one tv station. With proposal, 
Lee has linked complex fee tv question to bigger and even more com- 
plex issue, of allocations. It'll be field day for fee tv combatants. 

-SR- 
RKO's "The Conqueror," produced before General Teleradio purchased 
Hughes' studio, will be launched with $1 million ad budget latter 
part of February. Film will hit 40 cities with 60% of budget going 
into spot radio and tv. More than 300 radio, 50 tv stations will be 
in debut act. Terry Turner, long with RKO and now with GT, is man 
behind saturation plan. FC&B is agency. 

-SR- 
How do you make sure they remember the name of your product? Schwerin 
Research gives these tips based on its experience testing tv com- 
mercials: (1) Show product long enough and big enough — how long and 
how big depends on how well established brand is already; how easy 
it is to read name on package; whether product has easy or hard name 
to recall. (2) Show package early in commercial, then demonstrate 
its features. (3) Make it easy to read name of product ; if package is 
weak, try placing name alongside it as a legend. (4) Be careful 
about superimposing legends over product. You lose identity this way. 

-SR- 
Long-awaited audit of tv circulation on continuous basis is step 
nearer, NARTB announced, after tv board approved new tests of inter- 
view technique during West Coast meeting last week. After tests comes 
pilot study on national basis. Field tests by Politz in 2 markets 
showed NARTB technique worked well when compared with meters Politz 
installed as check. But more tests are needed to nail down technique. 



.1 



SPONSOR, Volume 10, No. 3, 6 February 1956. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Publications, Inc. Executive, Editorial. Advertising. Circulation Offices, 40 E. 49th St.. New 
York. IT. Printed at 3110 Elm Ave.. Baltimore. \fd. $8 a year In U.S. *9 elsewhere Entered as second class matter 29 Jan. 1948 at Baltimore postoffice under Act of 3 Mar. 187* 






I 

REPORT TO SPONSORS for 6 February 1956 

Survey uncovers There's big move on to stabilize rates in radio. Daytime tv is 
radio-tv trends experiencing major upsurge. Innovations in network radio have not had 
much adverse effect on spot radio. These are some of highlight 
findings in survey made by Davis J. Mahoney Agency among 60 key radio 
and tv rep and station execs. Survey formed background for speech by 
Roger Bumstead, agency's media director before RTES Timebuying and 
Selling Seminar last week. Other findings: Securing "AA" evening tv 
adjacencies in spot tv is much tougher than in past, but can be done 
if started at right time of the year and with advance notice. There's 
small, growing trend for saturation buyers to stay on radio longer. 

-SR- 
Daytime tv hits Recent analysis by ARB (December 1955) breaks down early-morning tv 
male animal audience this way: 7:00-9:00 a.m., 21% men, 44% women, 35% children. 
Hours from 9:00-11:00 a.m. show 12% men and from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 
p.m. , 14% male viewers. Viewers-per-set is higher from 7:00-9:00 a.m. 
than at any other period up to 5:00 p.m. Figure is 1.90 viewers in 
7:00 to 9:00 period and 1.79 in 3:00 to 5:00 p.m. period. 

-SR- 

Turnover high Decline of soap operas on daytime tv has led to replacement with 

on daytime tv shows of high audience turnover, large cumes . New ABC TV "Afternoon 
Film Festival" follows that trend, permits reruns with low chance 
of same seeing film twice. (ABC proposes to rerun films 4 times over 
7 months.) Researchers calculated that if home viewed one of 
"Festival" films, chances were 36 to one it would not see it again. 
Probability figures indicated only 2.7% of potential audience (those 
viewing regularly between 3:00-5:00 p.m.) would see show second time. 

-SR- 
Summer reruns Further information on reruns comes from third Nielsen study on 

keep audience subject. Study confirms previous findings that reruns compare favor- 
ably with non-rerun shows during summer in length of viewing and 
share of audience. Nielsen compared 22 shows that reran during 
summer with 11-show non-rerun "control group," whose ratings matched 
those of first run of rerun group. Rerun group showed 7% decline in 
time viewed, while control group showed 9% decline in summer. Rerun 
group dropped off 5% in share of audience during summer while con- 
trol group dropped off 2%. 

-SR- 

Adman knifes Account supervisor with top NY agency takes current agency "marketing 
marketing tack approach" over coals, tells agencymen to make clients bigger through 
better advertising and stop being "frustrate d marketing men." 
Criticism of agencies entering marketing field is that it will be 
accomplished at expense of creative advertising. For more of attack 
on trend, see "I say marketing is malarkey," page 34 of this issue. 

-SR- 
Film producers Tv film producers and distributors will participate in NARTB Tele- 
join tv Code vision Code (on an associate basis) under resolution adopted by 

NARTB Code Review Board meeting in Carmel, Cal., Meeting Chairman 
G. Richard Shafto, Wis-TV, Columbia, S. C, said: "It becomes apparent 
. . . public appreciation for television programs can bes t be en- 
larged through a single code applicable to broadcasters of live 
programs and producers and distributors of film programs." 

(Sponsor Reports continues page 107) 



SPONSOR 



HAPPY IS THE ADVERTISER WHO IS ON 




SPATINI 




THE PAT & JACK SHOW OVER WPEN-THE 




HIGHEST RATED FOOD MERCHANDISING 




COFFEE 




PROGRAM IN THE PHILADELPHIA AREA 



Represented nationally by Gill-Perna, Inc. 
New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco 
*Pulse: Sept. -Oct. 1955 



The frowns on the advertisers below are because they 
couldn't buy participations in the show. It's now SOLD OUT. 
We'll be happy to put you on the waiting list, however. 





THE 
PAT & JACK 

SHOW 

9:05-10 A. M. Daily 





6 FEBRUARY 1956 




advertisers use 




ARTICLES 



THREE CITY PROGRAMMING REPORT 



I. Hollytvood: You can cracU the dam 

Release of feature film backlog changes movietown thinking, benefits advertisers. 
Studios to produce more feature-length television films 



2. Sew York: Hon- slums are born 

Candid look at network programing gives behind-the-scenes knowledge of hows 
and whys of show selection, allows agency-client planning 



6 February 1956 
Volume 10 Number 3 



2fi 



28 



3. London: U.S. adman reports on Rritish tv 

After five months of commercial tv in London, a New York agencyman views 
programing and possibilities for American advertisers abroad •** 



AGENCY AD LIBS 

AGENCY PROFILE, Charles V. Skoog 

49TH & MADISON 

MR. SPONSOR, Murray Vernon ... 

NEW & RENEW .. 

NEW TV STATIONS . 

NEWSMAKERS 

P.S. __ 

RADIO RESULTS _. 

ROUNDUP 

SPONSOR ASKS . 
SPONSOR BACKSTAGE . 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 

TIMEBUYERS 

TOP 20 TV SHOWS 



f sui/ marketing is malarkey 

Last year's fad was motivational research, this year it's marketing, says out- 
spoken adman who feels agencies should stick to advertising *»4 



You don't need ratings to get results 

Armstrong's "Circle Theatre" gets good audience response, dealers are enthusi- 

astic over program, sales are up — despite stiff competition •»*» 



There's more to radio and tv research 

SPONSOR supplies facts behind the figures of one rating organization, tells 

how it has fared in shifting from standard rating techniques •>« 



Robert Hall puts $3 million into tv-radio pattern 

Pipe racks from little antennas grow as clothier channels 60% of 1956 adver- 
tising budget to the broadcast media in current drive 40 



COMING 



Hollywood branch admen really have problems 

There's only one hour in the day during which Hollywood ad agency branch 
managers can speak with their Madison Avenue counterparts. It's just one pill 
the California exec must swallow as a result of national separation 20 Feb. 

Say what you want, marketing is here to stay 

SPONSOR'S Ben Bodec, author of SPONSOR'S "The Advertising Agency in 
Transition" series, hits back at agencyman who claims in current issue that 
"Marketing is Malarkey." 20 Feb. 



Editor and President: Norman R. Glenr 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper Gler 

Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bernard 

Vice Pres.-Adv. Dir.: Charles W. Godwin | 

Executive Editor: Miles David 

Editorial Director: James E. Allen 

Senior Editors: Alfred J. Jaffe, Alvin Hi 
Evelyn Konrad 

Assistant Editor: Robert S. Solotaire 

Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman, Joe C 

Editorial Assistants: Morton C. Kahn, Lc 
Morse 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 

Photographer: Lester Cole 

Advertising Department: Arnold Alport, 
sistant Advertising Manager; Edwin 
Cooper, Western Manager; John A. Kov< 
Production Manager; Charles L. M 
George Becker, Jean Engel 

Circulation Department: Evelyn Satz, 
scription Manager; Emily Cutillo, Mir 
Mitchell, Dorothy O'Brien 

Office Manager: Catherine Scott Rose 

Readers' Service: Augusta B. Shearman 

Accounting Department: Laura Oken, L 
Fazio 

Secretary to Publisher: Helen L. Hanes 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS 
combined with TV. Executive. Editorial Circulation I 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49th & Mai { 
New York 17. N. Y. Telephone: MUrray H1U » l 
Chicago Office: 161 E Grand Ave. Phone: SU ' 
7-9863. Los Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset Boul ■ 
Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Dallas Office: 311 8. •' 
St. Phone STerling 3591. Printing Office: 8110 1 
Ave.. Baltimore 11. Md. Subscriptions: Doltad I 1 
$8 a year. Canada and foreign $9. Single cosies: 
Printed is U.S.A. Address all correspondence I' 
E. 49th St., New York 17. N. Y. MTJrray Hill 8- 
Copyright 1955. SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS l»M 





WHITE 

SOAPi, I 



1 



Pacific Coast advertisers reach more people with the 

COLUMBIA PACIFIC RADIO NETWORK than 
with any other single medium . . . including all other 
regional networks, represented by cbs radio spot sales. 



CASE HISTORY-AUTOMOTIVE 




Los Angeles Radio 

Saturation Builds World's 

Biggest Buick Agency 

In business three years — today the biggest 
Buick dealer in the world. 

First month in business, 57 new car sales — 
today, monthly average 10 times that. 

That's the short but stirring saga of Ed James 
and his I l-acre "Jamestown" in downtown 
Los Angeles. 

There's one constant element in James' suc- 
cess story: he saturates Los Angeles area car- 
buyers by saturating independent radio. 

Ed James' sparkling jingles are on KBIG every 
day . . . have been -for the past three years, 
telling listeners why volume sales, volume 
savings make "Jamestown-Buicktown best 
place to buy your Buick." 

Huge, sprawling, rich Southern California 
can be reached best by radio . . . KBIG plus 
other stations if, like Ed James, you want 
100% dominance; KBIG alone, if you want 
the greatest coverage at lowest cost-per- 
thousand listeners. 

Any KBIG account executive or representa- 
tive will be glad to give you the complete 
published story of Ed James' radio success. 






JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, California 
Telephone: HOIIywood 3-3205 

Nat. Rep. Robert Meeker & Assoc. Inc. 




Marjorie Freeman, N.W. Ayer, New York, 
says that evening radio still has an attractive 
audience which advertisers tend to ignore. "Not 
everyone has access to or interest in a solid block 
of tv programing," she adds. "There's no question 
but that the audience at night is diminished. Yet 
too many stations still maintain Class A rates based 
on 1947 audience figures, and thus discourage 
advertisers and timebuyers alike. One solution 
might be an all-hours card which hits a happy 
medium between Class A and Class B. Evening 
time d.j.'s particularly in smaller markets get 
substantial numbers of loyal listeners. It would 
help buyers if there were more precise audience 
break-downs to show who these listeners are 
rather than show ratings only." 



Bernard Singer, Harry B. Cohen, New York, 
feels that "golden hours could be saved if only 
there were uniformity in station rate cards — 
particularly in tv." He points to the greate waste 
of time often implicit in interpreting some rate 
cards as they now stand. "Often agencymen have to 
make frequent calls to reps to clear up certain 
ambiguous points, and this process can slow up 
the works on a big campaign." He things that the 
time saving would extend just as much to reps and 
stations. If rate cards were similar in format 
and information on rates complete, the time spent 
on preparation of estimates and contracts could 
be cut down materially. "Timebuyers think of 
saving time," says he, "as well as of buying it." 



Sylvan Taplinger, radio-tv director, Hirshon- 
Garfield, New York, says its up to agencies to over- 
come client prejudice in radio buying. "Every- 
one's crowding into early morning and 4:30-7:00 
p.m. to the point of diminishing returns," he 
explains. "Sometimes, one gets the feeling that 
many advertisers don't listen to their announce- 
ments or they'd find that they may be getting 
bigger audiences in those time periods, but they're 
losing in impression and identification because of 
the double- and triple-spotting. A large-budget 
advertiser particularly would be much better off 
working on cumulative audiences by spreading his 
announcements through the day and evening too, 
and making a harder impact upon fewer people 
at a time. Too many are buying theory on paper." 



SPONSOR 





utfere's a *P ' ■ '" 





| WJlU-TV 




fWJ^L 



"TV ydtbOtUyu^ I 



Now! Live Color Commerci 




RCA Pioneered and Developed Compatible Color Television 



Jithyour RCA -3V ! 

imple lens system added to RCA "3V" 

Camera picks up live-action color 

:ommercials...and color opaques of all kinds 




IOW you can go to "live" color in the least expensive way imaginable. 
RCA engineers have worked out an extension lens system which 
In be used with any RCA "3V" Camera to pick up all kinds of product 
[splays . . . live ... in action ... in highest quality color. And the 
Ime system can be used for televising color opaques in the simplest 
>ssible manner. 

roducts to be colorcast are set upon a small, fixed stage (as shown on 
jposite page). Any type of action which can be carried out in a 

lited area is practical. You can turn products around, upside down, 
. . show liquids foaming . . . real bottle pouring . . . use of tools 

. appliances in operation . . . wind-up toys in action ... all kinds 

animation. 

>lor opaques can be artwork, charts, maps, diagrams, magazine pages, 
i>mic strips. They can be mounted on an easel, on a flip-over stand (as 
pown at right), or held in the hand. You can use artwork or catalog 
lustrations and thus avoid making slides. Color rendition is nearly 
erfect; there are no density problems as with color slides. 

jth products and opaques are televised in the open ... in fully lighted 
j>oms. No need for light covers or strobe lights. Pictures have high 
psolution inherent in vidicon type camera. Picture quality and color is 
qual in every way to that attained with studio type color cameras. 

evelopment of a push-button operated 4-input multiplexer makes it 
jssible to use an RCA "3V" camera for televising "live" color com- 
mercials, color opaques, color transparencies, color slides and color 
Ims. Such an arrangement provides maximum usefulness of equip- 
ment — gets you into color in the fastest and least expensive way. 

Lnd remember, the RCA "3V" Film Camera System is the system which 
post broadcast engineers believe to be the best. 




Color opaques in series, at a flip of the wrist. 



For complete technical information on the new RCA "3V" 
Color Film System, call your RCA Broadcast Sales Represen- 
tative. In Canada: write RCA VICTOR Company Ltd., Montreal. 



RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA 

BROADCAST EQUIPMENT, CAMDEN, N. J. 



® 




Live color commercials with a minimum of props, 
showing hands, etc. 








'I 




RADIO KPQ GETS 

Results . . . 

i 



TO 



//% 





And We Challenge All 
Other North Central 
Washington Media 
To Disprove Us! 

Yes, that's a strong state- 
ment, but we are prepared to 
back that claim to the hilt 
. . . with money on the line 
if necessary. 

Perhaps it's our captive 
market, with our surrounding 
curtain of mountains that 
eliminates outside radio and 
TV penetration; or perhaps 
it's simply that we have out- 
standing audience appeal. 
Regardless of the reason why, 
our ARBI rating of 3.6 is 
one of the highest in the 
nation. 

So if you're buying — or 
plan to buy — the heart of 
Washington State, why waste 
money testing? Use the 
ONE MEDIUM that pro- 
duces 2 to 1! Use KPQ 
Wenatchee. 
AN ABC-NBC AFFILIATE 





5000WATT! 
560 K.C. 
WENATCHEE i 

WASHINGTON 



"Apple Capital of the World" 
REGIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Moore and Lund, Seattle, Wash. 
NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES 

Forjoe and Co., Incorporated 
(One of the Big 6 Forjoe Represented 
Stations of Washington State) 




by Bob Foreman 

Admen icttlk to banh through vale of tears 

It can't fail to occur to even the most heart-hardened that 
this business of doing television, live and on film, is rough on 
the performer, a thought that struck me forcibly the other 
evening as I was watching a lovely young lady announcer 
standing before the cameras, hour after hour, rehearsing and 
re-rehearsing what must have appeared to the home audience 
later as the most effortless of commercials. Again and again 
she had to deliver the same lines and hold up the same jar 
and pat the same lock of hair and each time she played the 
part to the hilt; not once did she grumble or kid around or 
fly off the handle, reactions to the tedium and drudgery of 
what she was doing which might have seemed appropriate. 

This stoic lass made me think of what I had heard H. V. 
Kaltenborn say only a few days before on Person to Person 
about his own personal distaste for the medium — in contrast 
to the simple pleasure of doing radio. H. V. doesn't like 
doing tv, to put it mildly. 

I used to spend many enjoyable business hours in radio 
recording studios way back when Fibber's closet was the top 
yok in the entertainment world. Two of us and an engineer 
(plus performers, of course) — that was all it took as far as 
people go. And people went a lot farther then while having 
real fun doing it. 

Today Mammon alone knows how many people it would 
require to produce similar lengths of copy for the home 
screen. A film chap I know, conjuring up this same thought 
once kept a list of how many folks got their hands into a 
filmed cha inbreak he was doing. I think he lost count at 
(Please turn to page 51 




10 



SPONSOR 




COMPLETE 

SALES 

SERVICE 



Typical P 



' ca ' P „v built in '"" - . or 
«„od stores. Th« P jpor feor 



ma 

of food 



one s 
are 



pot 



featur 



ailing 



one prog'-"; J^ooncements co« 

<*»«*o*»% constantly o-7 sona , «,,!,. 
jaler* are "-"T..... mail " nd P 



pro 



duets 



b , dir.« """ 





p., *^ ett ^ 




">cr e 



*>o, 






'enc e 



. • from before the telecast 
• ••until the product is sold 

KCMC-TV is constantly working for the advertiser! Building, maintaining an audience 
of over half a million . . . pre-selling the product with promotion . . . pushing sales with 
aggressive merchandising! _ TH|S [$ JHE FORM(JLA THAT HA$ G|V£N 

KCMC-TV UNMATCHED ADVERTISER AND 
AUDIENCE ACCEPTANCE IN 161,680 TV 
HOMES IN FOUR STATES. 

Television Magazine, Jan., 1956- 
YOU GET MORE THAN JUST 
TIME WHEN YOU BUY THE 




others concer 



100,000 
WATTS 



Richard M. Peters 

Director National Sales 
and Promotion 



Powerhouse of 

the Southwest 



KCMC-TV 

CHANNEL 6 

TEXARKANA, TEXAS-ARKANSAS 

Represented By 

Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, Inc. 



CBS • ABC 
INTERCONNECTED 



Walter M. Windsor 

Genera/ Manager 




...gathered from everywhere 
by wire and special 
correspondents . . . edited by 
the WEMP news department 
of four full-time newsmen under 
the direction of Don O'Connor . . . 
and presented 38 times daily, 
every day, on WEMP. 
Yes, regular newscasts on the 
half hour, special bulletins 
throughout the day, on-the-local- 
scene-reports from our two news 
trucks keep Milwaukeeans 
"in touch" with things, and radio 
dials set at WEMP. This happy 
habit adds up to the fact that your 
clients can more effectively get 
"in touch" with Milwaukee through 
WEMP. Get the story from our reps 



Milwaukee's Best Buy 



WEMP 



5000 Watts at 1250 



1935-1955 . . . 20 yearn of service to Milwaukee • Represented nationally by Hcadley-Reed 



l\ 



L 




irw MADISON 

sponsor invites letters to the editor 
Address 40 E. 49 St., New York 17. 

MARKETING MEMOS 

I was very much interested in the 
marketing articles in SPONSOR ... if 
reprints are available, I should like 
very much to have a set. 

Leonard Carlton 
Kenyon & Eckhardt, Inc. 
New York, N. Y. 
In connection with your marketing 
series, I hope you will make reprints 
available. If you do, we would like 50 
copies. This has been one of the most 
important series of articles sponsor 
has yet run. 

Alfred L. Hollender 
Vice president 
Grey Advertising Agency 
New York, N. Y. 
We find your articles on Agency in 
Transition to be of great interest. I 
would like reprints of this series. 

Howard S. Shepard 

Radio-Tv Dept. 

BBDO 

New York, N. Y. 

• 16-page reprint of first four articles now in 
preparation. Single copy 35c ; 10 to 49 copies, 
30c each; 50-100 copies 25c each. 



CORRECTION 

In sponsor's issue of December 26th 
under "Broadcast industry executives," 
you carried an item which, to put it 
mildly, was a tremendous surprise both 
to Fred and to me: "Dorothy Rabell, 
former affiliation KSON, San Diego, 
new affiliation Sterling Television, New 
York, sales manager." 

While we did not see this, since we 
were out of town, believe me we have 
heard a great deal about it. Our many 
enemies in the business are calling our 
new friends and saying, "I see Fred 
and Dottie finally split up," and our 
friends are calling Fred and saying, 
"What happened?" 

Since the people who know us in the 
business are well aware that this sta- 
tion h^ always been a husband-and- 
wife team operation, your item is em- 
barrassing. Please take immediate steps 
to run a correction. 

Dorothy Rabell 
Executive Vice President 
KSON, San Diego, Cal. 



12 



SPONSOR 



w 



SEE- PAY" TELEVISION! 



2,770,528 
People, 



495,000 
TV Sets 




(As of Oct. 1, '55) 



in Kentucky 
and Indiana. 

VIA 





WAVE-TV 



CHANNEL 



3 



LOUISVILLE 



Reaching As Many Families in Its Kentucky 
and Indiana Area As: 



Affiliated with NBC, ABC, DUMONT 



SPOT SALES 

Exclusive National Representatives 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



26 Daily Newspapers Combined! 
115 Weekly Newspapers Combined! 
12 Leading General Magazines Combined! 
16 Leading Farm Magazines Combined! 
14 Leading Women's Magazines Combined! 
All Home and Fashion Magazines Combined! 

13 



THE B 



St ^ ! " 

v STATION 




,„ S'.3 e p 500 »•** dstW* „ ft4 «t.O0 
« t>»- *° 11:60 pta :,,00*6Hna60.eO 

&»>«•$ l**' * 1 * wW 90.09 V- w 



*% 




More national spot advertisers 
choose KiNG-TV than any other 
station* . . nationwide. 






Rorabaugh, 1955 
* Multiple station markets 



Channel 5— ABC 

100,000 Watts 

Ask your BLAIR TV Man 



FIRST IN SEATTLE-TACOMA 



KING-TV 






BRITISH TV 

As you know, commercial, or inde- 
dependent television was launched 
with a great banging of the drum on 
23 September. 

Now after just a few months. I think 
it is fair to say that the new medium 
has gained a firm foothold in the Lon- 
don and Home Counties area. The au- 
dience, however, is small — not more 
than 500,000 families at the most; but 
the indications are that it will grow 
rapidly, and that when the Birming- 
ham and Manchester studios open (in 
February and about April, respective- 
ly), the figure may reach some two 
million. 

Nevertheless, commercial tv here is 
not having an easy passage, largely 
because advertisers have no say in 
programs at all. Some of them feel 
they are getting little return from a 
medium which, at the moment is yield- 
ing so low an audience. 12 advertisers 
have already withdrawn. 

All in all, the initial results are 
somewhat below expectations, and 
there is likely to be increasing pres- 
sure by commercial interests for the 
relaxation of the stringent rules gov- 
erning advertising, which Parliament 
insisted upon incorporating in the Tel- 
evision Act. We may — who knows 
see American-style sponsored tv yet! 
Bryan Samain 
London, England 



THEIR OWN SOLUTION 

We are not in accord with the em- 
phasis on cost-per-thousand; hence, 
we came up with what we think is a 
practical date-finder. Example of same 
is attached and perhaps you will find 
use for it when you are looking for 
dates of cycles of time. 

Red Quinlan 

Vice president 

American Broadcasting Co. 

Chicago, HI. 




• The WBKK "Expiration Date Finder" (heavy 
plastie with relophane-type overlay) ean be ob- 
tained free by writing to Red Quinlan. 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



15 



HERO: 

one of a series of paintings 

of Washington by William Walton 

commissioned by WTOP Television 

at Broadcast House, Washington, D. C. 

Represented by CBS Television Spot Sales 



16 



SPONSOR 



J^-vt 



» 





i 



/ 



i > 



by William Walton. 
Third of a series of paintings of Washington 
commissioned by WTOP Television 

at Broadcast House, Washington, D. C. 
Originally published in Broadcasting-Telecasting, 
January 9, 1956. 
Reprints of this series available on request. 







by Joe Csida 
Will net program control end show packagers? 

Program control has always been a subject that has held 
substantial fascination for me. To the advertiser, and cer- 
tainly to the agency, who control the program which sells the 
merchandise, it is naturally of great consequence. There is 
little question that from the peak days of aural broadcasting 
to today there have been significant shifts in program con- 
trol. When radio was riding high the majority of important 
shows were completely under the control of the advertising 
agencies. As tv has developed, the networks (and particu- 
larly NBC and CBS) have sat themselves firmly in the driv- 
er's seat of that giddy, jet-speed vehicle called programing. 

I've kicked this subject around with quite a few agency 
and network people in recent months. What surprises me 
most is their feeling that the independent packager is more 
or less doomed to disappear from the programing scene. My 
own research into this phase of programing doesn't support 
that opinion at all. 

The most obvious example, of course, of how potent a 
packager can be in the show sweepstakes is the Louis G. 
Cowan operation. Too much has already been written on 
"64" and The Big Surprise to require further comment 
here. It is my guess that the Cowan office as a packaging 
operation will be coming up with shows that sell merchandise 
for a long time. And certainly there is little likelihood that 
any benefits will be held in the near future for the Goodson- 
Todman office. 

But most important of all is that on a somewhat less spec- 
tacular, yet consistently solid level, alert, ingenious and hard- 
working packagers are producing shows both in radio and tv, 
local and network, daytime and nighttime which are getting 
audiences and moving goods for sponsors. The Wilbur Stark- 
Jerry Layton office, for example, produces Modern Ro- 
mances for Colgate-Palmolive, five days a week, via NBC 
TV. In its own quiet way "Romances" draws substan- 
tial numbers of exactly the kind of audience CP is seeking 
and selling. I had occasion last week to sit in on the show a 
couple of days. I've never seen a more tightly organized, 
more efficient operation in the dramatic field. Sheldon 
"Tom" Reynolds directs the daytime drama with an unex- 
cited, yet firm touch which gets maximum values out of the 
simple, moralistic weekly tales and convincing, plausible, 
occasionally even stirring thesping out of the actors. A gent, 
(Please turn to page 58) 

6 FEBRUARY 1956 



FIRST IN A SERIES 



makes a 
radio station 



Ask the listener. He'll say: 
good listening. 

Ask the advertiser. He'll say: 
results. 

The radio station that pro- 
vides good listening and result- 
ful advertising has achieved the 
hallmark of greatness by the 
standards of America's system 
of radio broadcasting. 

On WFAA, the great radio 
station of North Texas, results 
mean a tremendous volume of 
sales, year after year. Adver- 
tisers use WFAA to sell suc- 
cessfully everything from bacon 
to automobiles . . . flour to 
shaving cream. 

That's because more people 
in 1 1 1 counties listen to WFAA 
than to any other radio station.* 
They like old favorites like the 
Early Birds. They like WFAA's 
fresh new ideas in program- 
ming So they keep listening . . . 
and buying. 

See your Petry man. 



•Source: 1955 Whan Study - A. C. 
Nielsen N. S. I. 




;{; Now completing its 26th consecu- 
tive year. Oldest live talent break- 
fast hour show in the U. S. 



WFAA 



NBC • ABC* TQN 



American radio station 

Edward Pelry & Co., Inc., Representative 
• •••••••••••••• 

17 



♦ 



New quarterly Hooper documents 
WTIX's increasing leadership in New Orleans 

Out of 44 quarters in the average radio day .... 



WTIX has 


23 firsts 


19 seconds 


2 thirds 




WTIX widens the gap! 




Station "A" has 

(50,000 watt net) 


15 firsts 


3 seconds 


11 thirds 


Station "B" has 


6 firsts 


3 seconds 


7 thirds 



In fact WTIX is the only station with nothing but 

win, place and show in all quarter hours. 

Current first place Hooper share of audience: 21.2%**. Second 
Station: 18.0%. Third station, 11.3%. My, how listening habits 
of a lifetime have been overturned in New Orleans. And how buy- 
ing habits are keeping pace. Talk to Adam Young, or WTIX 
General Manager Fred Berthelson. 

'Hooper Continuing Measurement ol Broadcast Audience, Oct. -Dec, 1955 
"Hooper average share of audience, 7 a.m. -6 p.m. Mon.-Fri. Dec. 1955-Jan. 1956 



■ilLveMl 



qM 



3NTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 

President: Todd Storz 



New Orleans 16, La. 



18 



WHB, Kansas City KOWH, Omaha WDCY, Minneapolis-Sr. Paul WTIX, New Orleans 

Represented by Represented by Represented by Represented by 

John Blair & Co. H-R Reps., Inc. Avery Knodel Adam J. Young, !r. 

SPONSOR 



New and renew 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



l. New on Radio Networks 



SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



-Appelgate Adv, Munsey, 
Indiana 



ABC 



ill Bros, Munsey, lindiana 

;atrice Foods, LaChoy div, Chi Foote, Cone & Belding, Chi . ... ABC 

ristol Myers, NY DCSS, NY _ ABC 

algon, Pittsburgh Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, ABC 

Pittsburgh 

amp?na Sales, Batavia, III Erwin, Wasey, NY CBS 

amobell Soup Co, Camden, NJ Ogilvy, Benson & Mather CBS 

urtis Circulation Co, NY BBDO, NY ..... _NBC 

ixie Cup, Easton, Pa Hicks & Creist, NY .. ABC 

romedary Ted Bates, NY ABC 



Breakfast Club; M-Th 9:05-9:10 am; 21 Jan 

..Breakfast Club; W 9:35-940 am, Th 9:15-9:20, F 
9:20-9:25; 7 March 
Breakfast Club; M 9:55-10 am; 2 |an; 13 wks 
. Breakfast Club; W 9:15-9:20 am; 15 Feb 



204 
204 
195 



eneral Foods, White Plains, NY Y&R, NY 

eneral Foods, White Plains, NY _ Y&R, NY 

eneral Foods, White Plains, NY Y&R, NY 



ABC __ 

ABC 

CBS 90 



azel Bishop, NY 
inlinger Agency, Wash 

lymouth Motors, Detr 

lymouth Motors, Detr ..._ 
I-Tips, Inc, L.I. City, NY 



Spector, NY CBS 

Albert Frank-Cuenther Law ..... CBS 

N. W. Ayer, Phila CBS 

N. W. Ayer, Phila CBS 

L. C. Gumbinner, NY NBC 



134 
156 
204 
204 
195 



leep-eze, Long Beach, Calif M. B. Scott, West Hywood ABC 

ta-Nu, Chi Lester L. Jacobs, Chi ABC 

rue Magazine, NY direct MBS 



House Party; T 3-3:15 pm; 17 Jan; 19 wks 

Aunt Jenny, Vi sp'ship T, Th 2:45-3 pm; 5 Jan; 13 wks 

Weekdays; 3 parties; 1 '24-1/25 

Breakfast Club; Th 9:55-10 am; 5 March 

When A Cirl Marries; opening seg W 10:30-10:45 am; 

4 Jan; 13 wks 
Breakfast Club; T 9.25-9:30 am; 3 Jan; 13 wks 
Breakfast Club; M, W, F 9:10-9:15 am; 9 Jan 
Wendy Warren and the News; 5 min seg T, W, Th 

12-12:15 pm; 3 January; 52 wks 
Road of Life; M-F 1-1:15 pm; 2 Jan; 52 wks 
Sidney Walten Show; S 9:15-9:30 am; 15 Jan; 52 wks 
..Amos and Andy; 5 min seg M, W, F 16, 18, 20 Jan 
Jack Carson Show; T, Th 17th, 19th Jan 
Mary Margaret McBride; M-T 10-10:05 am; 18 |an; 16 

Breakfast Club; T 9:15-9:20 am; 10 Jan 
Breakfast Cub; M, T 9:55-10 am; 19 Jan 
..Multi-message; T 8-8:30 pm; 17 Jan, 24 Jan; Th 8-8:30 
pm 19 Jan, 26 Jan 




Robert F. 
Lewine <3> 



2. Renewed on Radio Networks 




SPONSOR 



AGENCY 



STATIONS 



PROGRAM, time, start, duration 



larter Products, NY. 
ever Bros, NY 



-Ted Bates 
JWT, NY 



NBC 
CBS 



ongines-Wittnauer, NY Victor A. Bennett, NY CBS 

-ongines-Wittnauer, NY Victor A. Bennett, NY CBS 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Co, NY Y&R, NY .. CBS 

>afeway Stores, table products div, San Hoefer, Dietrich & Brown, ABC 

Fran San Fran . 

Vm Wrigley, Jr. Co, Chi _.... Ruthrauff & Ryan, Chi CBS 



195 
196 

59 
59 
32 



198 



Monitor; 1 Jan; 13 wks 

Arthur Godfrey Time; M, W, alt F 11-11:15 am; 2 

Jan; 52 wks 
News and Analysis; M-F 7-7:05 pm; 3 Jan; 13 wfts 
Symphonette; S 2-2:30 pm; 2 Jan; 52 wks 
Allan Jackson News; M-F 6-6:15 pm; 2 Jan; 5 wks 
No School Today; Sat 10-10:30 am; 52 wks 

Gene Autry; S 6-6:30 pm; 25 December 55; 52 wks 



I. Broadcast Industry Executives 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 




Mortimer 
Weinbach (3) 



3ene Accas 
lames E. Bailey 



ABC, NY, sales development director _ 

WBRC, Birmingham, vp and mng director 
A. C. Nielsen, NY, local research 



George M. Baillie 

.ionel Baxter .... WBRC, Birmingham, sales manager 

Robert Blake CBS TV, NY, press info, special projects director 

Deen H. Brooks WTRF, Wheeling, West Va 



■: T. Carlsen 
Byington F. Colvig ... 

Terry Cowling 

Steve Crowley 

A. W. Dannenbaum, 

Edward F. Evans 

Michael J. Foster __ 

Robert E. Gips 

Cordon Grannis ... 
lames L. Greenwald 



TVB, NY, director of operations 

WSPD-AM, vp and mng director 

Same, acct exec 

Same, mng director 

Same, Hywood office 

WSAZ-TV, Huntington, West Va, color prod coordinator 

KGDM, Stockton, Calif, general sales mgr 



KSFO, San Fran, acct exec 
. WXIX, Milwaukee, acct exec ... CBS TV spot sales, sales promotion director 

Cambridge School of Radio and TV, Boston, director WCOP, Boston, acct exec 

KCO. San Fran KSFO, San Fran, sales staff 

WPTZ, Phila, Commercial mgr Same, asst general mgr of rad-tv 



A. C. Nielsen, NY, local research 

CBS TV, NY, press relations mgr 

Mel Gold Productions, NY, production supervisor 

KOVR, San Fran, promotion director _ 

Product Promotions & Merchandising, NY, 

sales and adv promotion director 

WFLN, Phila, sales 

KROD-TV, El Paso 



KYA, San Fran, sales mgr 

" NY 



Herbert Groskin 

Dan C. Guthrie 

Ken Hildebrandt 

Clarence H. Hopper CBS 

George Jenkins ... WRBL, Columbus, commercial mgr 

lonn Kreiger 

Stephen B. Labunski WHB, Kansas City, sales 

Robert F. Lewine Hirshon-Garfield, NY, rad-tv director 

Donald A. Loughnane WTIX, New Orleans 

Albert R. McLaughlin _ KPTV, Portland, continuity director . 

lohn McMinn WFAA-TV, Dallas 

Vincent Melzae TPA, NY, acct exec _ 

Joseph D. Payne Ceorge P. Hollingbery, NY, acct exec 

S.epnen R. Rintoul, Jr Time Magazine, NY, merchandising 

Philip A. Roewe WKDA, Nashville 

James Russell ... _ _ 

John C. Sebastian _ ... CBS, film sales, NY 

James A. Stabile .... ABC, NY, business affairs director 

Fenton Taylor, Jr. Ruthrauff & Ryan, NY, acct exec _ 

erry Thompson WJRD, Tuscaloosa 

Western A. Todd ...Life Magazine, NY 

lack Tompkins KCMC-KCMC-TV, Texarkana, Texas, farm service 

. director _ 

Kay Trent KDUB-TV, Lubbock. Texas, program director 

Bon Tykeson KPTV, Portland, sales mgr 

u ?* Washburn KONA, Honolulu __ 

Mortimer Weinbach ABC, NY, director of personnel and labor relations 

T y'.w Yf est KOVR-TV, Stockton, Calif 

Ted Wolf KXOB, Stockton, Calif _ 



Same, acct exec 

ABC, NY, vp in charge of press info and adv 

Same, vp in charge of production 

Same, acct exec 

Katz Agency, NY, natl sales rep 

WCAU, Phila, acct exec 

KPAR-TV, Sweetwater-Abilene, Texas, station mgr 

KMYR, Denver, sales mgr 
..Same, vp in charge of production services 

Same, natl sales mgr 

KDUB, Lubbock, Texas, mgr 

WDCY, Omaha, general mgr 

ABC, NY, vp and program director 
..WDCY, Minn., program director 

Same, promotion mgr 

KBST-TV, Big Spring, Texas, sales mgr 
..Same, asst to president 

Same, Detr, mgr 

Venard, Rintoul & McConnell, NY 
. KPDQ, Portland, Ore, sales mgr 

WBAL, Baltimore, sales 
_Same, publicity director 
..Same, vp 

Erwin, Wasey, LA, acct exec 

WAPI, Birmingham, acct exec 

WFBR. Baltimore, local sales 

KWTV-KOMA, Okla City, farm director 

KOMA, Okla City, asst farm director 

Same, asst mgr 

Same, natl sales mgr 

KONA-TV, Honolulu, program mgr 

Same, vp 

Same, prom-publicity director 

KGDM, Stockton, Calif, sales 





Ken Hilde- 
brandt (3) 




Norrie 
West (3) 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



19 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



>« ii ami renew 






Cordon 

Crannis (3) 




Robert E 
Cips (3) 




Donald A. 
Loughnane (3) 




Albert R. Mc- 
Laughlin (3) 



lames L. 

Creenwald (3) 



lack 

Tompkins (3) 



4. Advertising Agency Personnel Changes 



NAME 



FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Andrew Armstrong . 

Allan Black 

Clen Bammann 

Frank Brady 

Harry Bressler 

Sanford D. Buchsbaum 

Draper Daniels 

James R. DeFoe 

Edgar J. Donaldson 

Herbert C. Drake 
Richard E. Cauen 



_ Leo Burnett, NY, plans supervisory committee 

-.BBDO, NY, producer-wrtr 

McCann-Enckson, Cleve 

.Harry B. Cohen, NY, vp in charge of mkting 

_McCann-Erickson, NY 

_.E. T. Howard, NY . 

_ Leo Burnett, NY, vp and cpy supervisor . 

_ BBDO, Cleve, cpywritr 

-WSYR, Syracuse, production supervisor 

_J. Walter Thompson, NY, vp 



Joseph Coodyear 

Joseph M. Greeley _ 

Chester Herzog 

William R. Hesse 



Y&R, Chi, public relations mgr and acct supervisor 

Caynor, Coleman, Prentis & Yarley, NY 

-Leo Burnett, NY, vp in charge of mkting 

B-B-T, NY, acct exec 

BBDO NY, vp and acct supervisor 

Thomas S. Jennings Roy S. Durstine, NY, media dept 

Breckenridge Jones Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City _ 

H. Ceorge Kaufman . 

Sanford H. Margalith 

Frank L. McKibben . 

James J. O'Neal 

Alberto Ortega 

William ). Pringle _ 

Ceorge L. Randall _ 

Malcolm Reybold 

Armand E. Rivchun . 

Arthur Rubloff 

Walter W. Stumpe . 

William D. Tyler 

Karl F. Vollmer 

James E. Weber 

Harry J. Wendland _ 

Austin L. W/man 

William T. Young 



David R. Doniger, NY, special events director 

Al Paul Lefton, Phila : 

Dan B. Miner, LA, acct exec 

_..D'Arcy Adv, St. Louis .. 

Foote, Cone & Belding de Mexico, Mexico City, mgr 

Foote, Cone & Belding, LA, vp and director 

Foote, Cone & Belding, NY, acct exec 

Compton, NY 

SSCB, NY 

Arthur Rubloff, Chi, chairman 

Kroger Co, Cinn, buyer 

Leo Burnett, NY, vp in charge of cpy dept 

Y&R, Chi, copy 

Leo Burnett, NY, vp and acct supervisor 

Edward S. Kellogg Co, La 



-Leo Burnett, NY 



— Same, creative services hd 

— C. J. LaRoche, NY, producer-writr 

— Marschalk & Pratt, NY, rad-tv business mgr 

— Same, vp in charge of acct mngment 

— DCSS, NY, rad-tv cpy chief 
— Same, tv director 

Same, mbr of plans board 

-Ceyer Adv, NY, rad-tv dept 

— Ketchum, MacLeod & Grove, rad-tv director 
__Ted Bates, NY, vp and acct exec 

_Same, vp 

Ted Bates, NY, press dept 

...Same, director 

Norman, Craig & Kummel, NY, acct exec 

Benton & Bowles, NY, vp and acct supervisor 

Same, media director 

McCann-Erickson, NY, merchandising 

Emil Mogul Co, NY, acct exec 

Zimmer, Keller & Calvert, Detr. 

— Stromberger, LaVene, Mckenzie, La, sr acct exec 
..Same, NY, vp and acct supervisor 

Same, vp in charge of all Latin American operations 
..Same, plans board chairman 

Goodman-Anderson Adv, LA, business development mgr 
-McCann-Erickson, NY, merchandising dept 
-Product Services, NY, exec staff 
..Same, General Outdoor Adv, Chi, chairman 

Needham, Louis & Brorby, Chi, mkting dept 
..Same, vp of plans supervisory committee 
...Same, vp and copy director 
...Same, director 
...Anderson-McConnell, Hywood, acct exec 

Leo Burnett, NY, director 
..Same, vp in charge of client services 



5. Sponsor Personnel Changes 

NAME FORMER AFFILIATION 



NEW AFFILIATION 



Maurice Atkinson _.. 
A. C. Barioni 



Co, L.I. City, NY, beer merchandising 
Remington electric shaver div, 



Ralph H. Braun 

Elaine Brown 

Wells R. Chapin 

Robert J. Clark 

Robert P. Clarke, Jr. 

Joseph F. Cullman 

Dr. Robert P. Joslin .. 

Willis J. Oldfield 

Lee R. Pevear 

E. P. Reavey, Jr. 

Stuart Sherman 

Charles J. Simon 

Herbert Simpson 

Robert M. Smith 

Harry B. Wasserman 
Albert F. Wild 



-Einson-Freeman 

director . ... 
-Sperry Rand, Bridgeport 

natl sales mgr 
BBDO, NY, public relations 
.Compton Adv, NY, publicity 

. GE, Syracuse, broadcast equipment sales mgr Same, product planning mgr 

-Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City, new products mgr Same, soap division, merchandising mgr 

-Sperry Rand, Bridgeport, Remington electric shaver div, Same, adv mgr 

sales prom mgr 

-Philip Morris, NY, exec vp Philip Morris Overseas, chairman and president 

-Monsanto Chemical Co, St. Louis, sr research chemist Fairmont Foods Co, Ohama, product research mgr 



Pabst B.ewing Co, Chi, sales development director 

Same, general sales mgr 

Same, general sales mgr 

Fedders-Quigam Corp, Maspth, NY, public relations dir 

Lever Bros, NY, brand publicity mgr 



CM, AC spark plug div, Flint, public relations 

-.Lever Bros, NY, adv and sales prom 

_W. A. Sheaffer Pen Co, Ft Madison, Iowa 

Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City, adv director —Same, vp in charge of adv 

_.GE, Syracuse, product planning mgr 

Sperry Rand, Bridgeport, Remington electric shaver div, 

adv mgr 

Colgate-Palmolive, Jersey City 

.. Bymart-Tintair, NY, Eastern district mgr 

__CE, Syracuse, sales mgr for broadcast equipment 



Same, sales promotion mgr 
Same, packaging coordinator 
Same, Eastern sales mgr 



Same, broadcast field sales mgr 
Same, asst general mgr 

Same, soap division, new products mgr 
Same, vp and general sales mgr 
Same, sales mgr 



6. New Agency Appointments 

SPONSOR PRODUCT (or service) 



AGENCY 



First Natl Bank & Trust, Okla City 



Bank business 



General Electric, Syracuse, electronics division Electronic equipment 

Hoffman Electronics, LA Electronic equipment 

Philco, LA Radios 

Studebaker-Packard, So. Bend, Ind Packard and Clipper autos 

Whitehall Pharmacal, NY Anacin and Preparation H ... 



Hall & Thompson, Okla City 

Y&R, NY 

Dan B. Miner, LA 

Mays & Co, LA 

_ D'Arcy, NY 

Ted Bates, NY 



1 • 




Wft/T-f 




Herbert Groskin (3) Deen H. Brooks (3) 



Stephen B. 
Labunski (3) 



Don Tykeson (3) Gene Accas (31 James A. Washburn (3) 



20 



SPONSOR 






p v y.*. ***** * »" B^^'^Sfc*^' '< 






QsK^i* 



~M 



mm^m. 



l! 



S - jL> 



x : *., 



ifiorifr 



for 



TLANQ- 



'<. 



atl 






Oregon's TV Giant is now the most 
powerful station in the entire West! 

KPTV Portland — the GIANT television station in the Pacific 
Northwest — has increased power to 1,000,000 watts to be- 
come the most powerful station in the West. The addition 
of a new tower 1,281 feet above average terrain to this giant- 
size power increase means MORE SALES in the big-buying 
Oregon market. Get the facts from NBC Spot Sales or call 
KPTV today. 



Portland, Oregon 



K PT V 



O O 

TELEVISION i 



channel % 




STORER NATIONAL 

SALES HEADQUARTERS 

TOM HARKER, V.P., Nalionol Soles Director 
118 E. 57th Street, New York, Eldorado 5-7690 

BOB WOOD, National Sales Manager 

118 E. 57th Street, New York, Eldorado 5-7690 

LEW JOHNSON, Midwest TV Sales Manager 
230 N. Michigan Ave., Chicago, FRonklin 2-6498 

GAYLE V. GRUBB, V.P., West Coast Sales Manage 
111 Sutter St., Son Francisco, Slitter 1-3631 



INBC 



Represented Nationally by 

SPOT SALES 



IT'S 

HOT 

IN 

BOSTON 





Pfr, nON BUILDS REPUTM* 



ON 




Murray Vernon 

Chairman of the Board 
Jacob Ruppert Breweries, New York 

"The trouble with beer is that it's too expensive in competition 
with general beverages like ginger ale," Murray Vernon, Ruppert's 
Chairman of the Board, told SPONSOR. 

"People don't realize that brewers pay 40% excise tax. But costs 
will be shifting in brewing in the next few years. Originally premi- 
um beers were sold at premium cost because of freight payments for 
shipping from Milwaukee and St. Louis. There'll be a day when the 
premiums will have to sell at local prices. 

"Advertising is an increasingly important factor in beer sales," he 
added. According to Vernon's estimate, a brewer has to sell some 
750,000 barrels annually as a minimum in order to afford the kind 
of advertising effort that'll let him stay in business. 

Ruppert will spend close to $3 million for advertising in 1956, a 
major chunk of it in air media. About $1.5 million of this money 
has gone into tying up the Giants for the year. 

"The agency business is callous," says Vernon, who's in a position 
to know. Toward the end of December, Ruppert's old agency, Biow 
Co., resigned the account to make way for the $9 million Schlitz 
business brought in by John Toigo from his cousin Adolph's agency, 
Lennen & Newell. Ruppert left Biow. A couple of weeks later, Biow 
resigned Schlitz. At this moment, Ruppert's agency appointment is 
still pending. Schlitz went over to J. Walter Thompson. 

"A team of four or five top company executives are screening half 
a dozen agencies," Vernon told sponsor. "There are a lot of factors 
to be considered: Merchandising is vital to a brewer. The agency 
we pick will have to be capable of handling sports programing. We 
want to know the top agency executives before making a final choice. 

"And lastly, but among our main considerations is the caliber of 
the account executive because he's the key to a successful campaign." 

Vernon predicts further consolidation in the brewing industry. 
"Like automobile companies," he says. "Shortly, there'll be 10 or 
15 top brewers. The little ones are dying out." 

He feels that the trend toward supermarket selling and brewers' 
emphasis upon tv will continue to revolutionize labeling, packaging. 
"Supermarkets do away with the returnable bottle. There'll be new 
sizes of cans to compensate." 

George Ruppert's son-in-law, Vernon is looking forward to spring 
when the older of his two sons will come into the business. * * * 



22 



SPONSOR 



WJBK-TV LEADS IN 121 OUT OF 180 
DAYTIME RATED PERIODS IN DETROIT 



Daytime TV viewing and advertiser interest 
are on the upswing, and both ARB and Pulse 
show WJBK-TV as the completely dominant 
daytime buy for the Detroit area's 1,600,000 
TV homes. Here are the figures for the 1 80 
weekday periods indicated: 



M0N.-FRL, 8 A.M. TO 5 P.M., DECEMBER ARB 

WJBK-TV, First in 121 Quarter Hour Periods 
STATION B, " " 23 " * " 

STATION C, " » 21 " " " 

STATION D, " " 10 " " " 

TIES 5 " " " 



Further, 50 of these periods on WJBK-TV have ratings of 8.0 or above, comparable 
on a rate card basis to a nighttime rating of 21.0. December Pulse not only 
agrees, but shows WJBK-TV's position to be even stronger: 26 firsts out of 36 
Monday through Friday quarter-hour strips, 8 A.M. to 5 P.M. Average rating 8.2. 




Such pulling power means extra selling power for you on 
WJBK-TV in the rich Detroit and Southeastern Michigan 
market. Cash in on the greater audience you get with 
WJBK-TV's top CBS and local programming, commanding 
Channel 2 dial position, 1,057-foot tower and maximum 
power of 1 00,000 watts. 



CHANNEL 



WJBK-TV* 



DETROIT 



\P\ Represented Nationally by THt KATZ AGtNCY 

National Sales Director, TOM HARKER, 118 E. 57th, New York 22, MURRAY HILL 8-8630 









Pioneer of television in the Carolinas, 
Top-Power WBTV has reached new heights 
in serving an ever-growing coverage area 
of more than 500,000 families. 

Jefferson Standard vision recently saw 
completion of a SIVi Million facility. 
Operating from these kingsize facilities, 
WBTV originated a "local live" program 
in full color on New Year's Eve, becoming 
the first station in the Southeast to be 
completely equipped for color telecasting. 

Years of leadership has projected this vision 
into programming, engineering, promotion, 
merchandising, and research. The vast 
Carolina television market has been 
cultivated by such vision resulting in more 
sales for advertisers! 

Advertisers with vision rate WBTV the finest 
in the Carolinas for "cost per thousand" 
and immediate sales results. The whole story 
of "Vision in the Carolinas" can be yours by 
calling: CBS Television Spot Sales or WBTV. 





Clmnxgf j^mTtfn&Mj 



Jkfpehson Standard Broadcasting Company 
'vision in the carolinas" 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



gpSCltf' 



^ ? oui 



■$?&& 



IftflS 6 



C0&S 



Where's Iv programing headed? 

SPONSOR visited Hollywood, New York and London to provide 
inside facts on new program developments and trends 





*, *>* **° aT 



Release of feature film backlog changes movietown 
thinking, benefiting advertisers. Deals can be made 
now. Studios to produce more feature-length tv 
film, will gladly entertain offers for first-run rights 




Candid look at network programing operations gives 
behind-the-scenes knowledge of hows and whys of 
show selection, allows agency-client planning. Q. 
and A. technique details network tv program thinking 




Here's the way a New York agencyman sees the tv 
programing picture in London after five months of 
commercial television. Facts and figures on British 
tv as a buy today for the American advertiser abroad 



THE SPECIAL REPORT FOR EACH CITY IS DETAILED ON FOLLOWING PAGES 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



25 




Yon can crack (lie 

Hollywood dam but you 

have to know how 



Mass release of feature films changed thinking 

in film capital. Deals can be made but take 

hard cash, promotion gimmicks, waivers 



n 



oily wood has been jolted. Per- 
haps harder than at any time since tv 
first broke on the horizon and indi- 
cated it would be a threat to the way 
the movies had conducted business for 
decades. 

The latest jolt that has shaken movie- 
dom to its foundations is the release 
of a great number of feature films to 
television. And the line-up of the 
movies makers who have blasted holes 
in the film backlog dam to let the flood 
of feature films pour through, reads 
like the Who's Who of Hollywood. 

RKO: Major portion of feature 
backlog sold to Matty Fox for tv. 

COLUMBIA: 100 major features 



have been made available to tv. 

PARAMOUNT: Large group of 
short subjects recently have been 
turned over to tv syndication. 

REPUBLIC: Just released 76 new 
features, some in the over-$4,000,000 
production budget class. 

The opening shots in the revolt 
against the standard way Hollywood 
has operated as the running mate of tv 
have been fired. Whether this is a 
full-scale revolution that will change 
the existing concept of tv programing 
the nation over is still to be deter- 
mined. Whatever the case, questions 
are being raised, questions which will 
effect tv programing plans and the ac- 




Three important points 
in buying Hollywood film 



1. Be ready to talk cash, not promises. Film owners will 
bargain but will not discuss deals on "if get loan" basis. 

2. Studio promotion gimmick must be a feature. Film 
purchase must not create serious exhibitor competition. 

3. Must permit studio to retain rights and control of the 
features other than on program for which pact was made. 



26 



tivities of admen throughout the na- 
tion. They are: 

1. Is the motion picture industry 
getting ready to take over television 
or vice versa? 

2. Now that the selling has started, 
will the tremendous backlog of feature 
pictures glut the tv program market. 
If this be the case, how much will their 
sale change existing programing struc- 
tures ? 

3. Are major studios with their per- 
sonnel, stars and facilities more avail- 
able to tv today than heretofore? 

4. Are brand-new motion pictures 
available to advertisers for first run 
on tv? 

Because of the importance of the 
radical changes underway in this phase 
of tv programing, SPONSOR asked its 
West Coast reporter to get answers to 
these and other questions to provide 
a clearer understanding of the new de- 
velopments for agency and client. Top 
people within the movie industry were 
talked to, queried on their thinking. 
Answers, thoughts on trends were pro- 
vided by such outstanding industry 
figures as Spyros Skouras of 20th 
Century-Fox, Arthur Loew of Metro- 
Goldwyn-Mayer, William Dozier of 
RKO, Herbert Yates of Republic and 
Samuel Goldwyn of Goldwyn Produc- 
tions. 

Concisely, the picture, as it emerges, 
looks pretty much like this: 

1. Motion-picture leaders have ac- 

SPONSOR 




DYNAMITE IN FORM OF MONEY HAS BEEN EFFECTIVE FORCE IN BREAKING HOLLYWOOD FILM BACKLOG DAM 



cepted fully the fact that tv cannot be 
ignored as a part of the ever-growing 
entertainment industry. Although they 
tried for years to fight it and fit it in 
where it would hurt the least, they are 
now agreed it's part and parcel of their 
business and they so proclaim it. 
Simply, they've reached the conclusion 
that what you can't beat, join. And 
their reasoning is not founded on sheer 
hopelessness. They feel that their per- 
sonnel, talent, facilities and past ex- 
perience make them the logical crea- 
tors of top-grade tv programs. 

2. The three studios (MGM, 20th 
Century-Fox, Warner's) actively in- 
volved in producing a tv program of 
their very own, freely admit that they 



got off on the wrong foot. In effect, 
they sent a boy out to do a man's job. 
They initially underestimated the task 
of creating quality entertainment for 
tv on a week-to-week schedule basis. 
They say this is being rectified and 
promise increasingly better quality on 
future programs. 

3. Feature pictures are available to 
tv. This means both those contained 
in the vast feature backlog, as well as 
some new product. 

Since the old feature backlog is the 
number one question in the minds of 
most tv people today, SPONSOR asked 
three basic questions at five of the 
major studios which have made no 
deals to date. The questions: 



• How can feature films be bought 
direct? 

• When? 

• How much? 

The simplicity of the questions must 
have been shocking for it was quite a 
while before top studio brass said they 
were ready for the Q. and A. treatment. 
The answers, boiled down, are: 
An advertiser or network interested 
in utilizing a group of these features 
on tv, has a good chance of making a 
good deal, if the proposition: 

• Permits some sort of promotion 
gimmick for the studio. Film brass 
are still reluctant to part with the film 
for just ordinary money — unless in the 

{Please turn to page 65) 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



27 




Mwork programing: stei 

Here is how three networks build ideas into new prograij 




WHAT HAPPENS BEFORE A PROGRAM REACHES THIS STAGE AT ALL THREE TV NETWORKS? YOU'LL FIND THE ANSWERS HERE 



— 



-step from brainwave to airwave 

rhey wage a constant thought battle to win the rating race, satisfy sponsors 



J he millenium for the networks will 
have arrived when all ratings are high, 
programs never change and the public 
is delighted with what they view night 
after night and would revolt if the 
status quo were changed. 

Unfortunately, the millenium is no- 
where in sight. Sponsors cry for some- 
thing new, higher ratings for their ad 
dollars; viewers become indignant, 
cast stones at yesterday's hero. The 
networks, in the unenviable role of 
trying to please everyone, know only 
one thing for certain: change is the 
cnly constant factor in the complicated 
formula of determining what makes a 
program successful. 

Networks war on one another, use 
every means to try to match suprem- 
acy. If one is the acknowledged leader, 
the others take better aim and try to 
bring him toppling down. 

This constant battling keeps the pro- 
gram departments of the three net- 
works humming in order to try to 
court public favor and steal the top 
Nielsens. 

As part of this special tv programing 
report, sponsor talked to producers 
and network programing department 
heads in order to give agencies and 
advertisers a behind-the-scenes picture 
of what goes on in the race for ratings, 
what new programs are in the offing 
and what is necessary in supplying 
these new shows. 

The heaviest new program buying 
time is now — February through April. 
Madison Avenue at the moment is on 
the qui vive as to what's new on the 
programing horizon and stands ready 
tc buy if the entry looks as if it has 
anything that will in some mysterious 
way cause it to emerge a winner. 

All three networks are busy, have 
much in the works. While cost figures 
and some of the show titles are still 



tightly-guarded secrets, SPONSOR found 
these facts: 

ABC, CBS and NBC currently have 
41 new program series in preparation. 
This total does not include the so-called 
spectaculars and one-shot prestige 
shows. 

At ABC there are 11 new program 
series, most of which are being pre- 
pared on film. While four of these 
are in the hush-hush stage, here are 
seven of the upcoming titles: Frontier 
Judge, Wire Service, Fast Freight, 
Command Performance, Jim Bowie, 
It's a Great Country and RFD, USA. 
All are half-hour in length except 
Command Performance which will go 
a 90-minute limit. 

In addition to the 11 in production, 
there are, of course, ABC's entries into 
the line-up of one-time specials in 60- 
and 90-minute lengths, some nine of 
which have previously been announced. 

At CBS the Joe and Mabel one-half 
hour film series is currently in pro- 
duction and may go into release in the 
spring under Carter Products sponsor- 
ship. In addition, 10 new ideas of 
various types are in different stages 
of preparation but titles will not be 
released for some time. 

NBC, with 20 new shows and some 
55 specials and spectaculars on its 
new program list, has 12 already com- 
pleted pilot films. Of the 20, titles 
are known for seven of them. They 
are: The Eagle and the Rose, Tom 
Sawyer, Johnny Mocassin, Impact, 
Have Camera, Will Travel, Assignment 
and Circus Boy. All are of the one- 
half hour variety save the Assignment 
series which will be 60 and 90-minute 
shows. 

SPONSOR has traced the steps of de- 
velopment of a typical new program at 
each of the networks. The findings 
explain what happens to a program 



from the time an idea is brought to 
the network until it is ready for pre- 
sentation on the air. The development 
stages outlined also illustrate why some 
programs often prematurely publicized 
never see the light of day while others 
seem to crop out of nowhere. 

While nothing is more publicized 
than programs after they're available 
for sale, the story of just who makes 
the decisions, how, while programs are 
being built has rarely been told. Here 
it is now, step-by-step . 

ABC: This network believes strongly 
iii utilizing not only the ideas but also 
the production know-how of outside 
producers in the motion picture and 
the tv film production fields. It oper- 
ates (similar to United Artists in the 
motion picture field) as advisor, finan- 
cier, distributor and partner to film 
producers. 

Generally, these are the steps in 
program development at ABC: 

A producer, preferably one with an 
established producing organization of 
his own, will approach ABC with an 
idea. The idea is discussed by a board 
consisting of Robert Kintner, presi- 
dent; John H. Mitchell, v.p. in charge 
ABC TV network; Robert Weitman, 
v.p. in charge of tv programing and 
Robert Lewine, v.p. and director of 
the tv program department. These 
four men will discuss the idea from 
the following points of view: 

A. Potential audience appeal (rat- 
ings). 

(Please turn to page 94) 



Top net officials answer 

six basic program questions 

For answers, turn page 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 




NEW YORK REPORT (continued) 



1. What type shows are networks interested in developing? 

2. Do networks insist on ownership or control of new programs? 

3. Where do networks look for new program ideas? 

4. Are ad agencies important sources of network program ideas? 

5. Will networks develop new programs to fit sponsor needs? 

6. Will networks pay to develop a new program idea? 

FRANK ANSWERS TO THESE SIX BASIC 
QUESTIONS WILL HELP YOU IN NETWORK TV PLANNING 



As part of sponsor's special report on New 
York tv programing, six specific questions 
were directed at top programing officials of 
the three networks. Their candid answers 
allow new insight into the thinking of per- 
sons who are, by and large, responsible for 
what the nation sees on its television screens. 

* * * 
SPONSOR: What type shows are 
networks interesting in developing? 

ABC: All kinds. We lean heavily toward hour 
lengths and film. We want important ideas. 
There are still too many "also rans" on tv, 
and we feel audiences are no longer inter- 
ested. Our preference for film is inherent 
in our particular kind of network set-up, but 
should not be considered a constricting fac- 
tor in any sort of program development. 

CBS: Our presentations of the big shows and 
specials are getting more frequent, and as 
each stands on its own merit, there is always 
need for ideas along these lines. But even 
for regular programs, we are constantly on 
the lookout for any and all kinds. The only 
criterion for us is quality and potential audi- 
ence appeal. There can be no formula, not 
to length, type of show, cost or any other 
considerations. The only formula we recog- 
nize is quality. This business is growing 
and changing much too fast for any other 
kind when it comes to evaluating goals. 

NBC: We want potential hits. It is impossible to 
confine hits to any one category, and so 



were always on the lookout for better ideas 
of every kind. Type, subject, length and 
cost-bracket are only secondary considera- 
tion. Suitability for color at the moment is 
important, since NBC is going to produce 
practically all new programs in color. But 
color is never enough. If the idea is no 
good, suitability for color will not make it 
any better. The movies taught this lesson. 

SPONSOR: Do networks insist on 
ownership or control of new programs? 

ABC: It's more a question of co-operation. We 
assume an advisory capacity. Most of our 
producers are independent film men who 
know their business. But they like to have 
us at their elbow when it comes to questions 
concerning network policies. For this rea- 
son we maintain a kind of ABC embassy in 
each of the major Hollywood studios, with 
whom we work ( Disney, Warner Bros., 
MGM ) . Our representative there has his 
own office right on the lot and is not only 
available for assistance on the production 
level but is also direct liaison between the 
producer and the sponsor or ad agency. 

CBS: We feel that editorial control over a pro- 
gram is of great importance. It is our job 
to maintain a balanced program schedule 
and with this kind of control, we can better 
protect everybody, and in turn the network 
and the sponsor. We naturally like to have 
the key producers of our programs on our 
own staff or to have a strong financial (and 
thereby supervisory) hand in independent 
(Please turn to page 99) 



30 



SPONSOR 





Doefl Cfi 



let i Ji- i«j3 I lie 
Med r.tieu ^]rt.,m 
iiJ2?u<n: about H 



From strength to strength with 




K.^J 



British-style result story: 

Ad appearing in British trade 
press tells how Revlon is hitting 
jackpot on tv in England too. That 
Revlon has done well with "non-pro- 
gram" tv advertising in Britain is in- 
teresting in light of fact its biggest 
U. S. success is built around a hit show. 



A II adman looks at British tv 

Programing hasn't flowered fully but ratings are much higher than in U.S. 
Biggest problem: way commercials are dropped willy-nilly into slum* 




Andrew IS. Vladimir, radio-tv plans director of Gotham- 
Vladimir Advertising, traveled to London to prepare the 
report below. He does not pretend to knowledge of all facets 
of British television (he spent two weeks in England). 
Instead, these are the candid reactions of a U.S. adman 
who watched programs intently, spoke to dozens of British 
television people and had available a background of factual 
material provided by Gotham- Vladimir's London associate. 



* 



«# ust a few weeks ago when I was in 
London the talk of the town was a new 
television show that had just premiered 
over the BBC called This Is Your Life. 
It starred a young Irishman by the 
name of Eamonn Andrews and was in 
many ways similar to the U. S. pro- 
gram. However the similarities be- 
tween the programs were, and still are, 
mechanical only. The atmosphere of 



the British version is restrained — if 
you can imagine such a word being 
applied to This Is Your Life. The show 
in its British translation becomes a 
tribute instead of a tear-dripping story. 
You can see the contrast best at 
the close of the show. Here in America 
This Is Your Life ends with the hero 
of the evening receiving (1) gifts, 
(2 l a kine of the show, (3) a projec- 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



tor to show it on and (4) an invitation 
to attend a party for him and all his 
friends at a Hollywood nightspot. The 
BBC version ends with the contestant 
receiving a rousing cheer from the 
audience. 

British television, whether it be on 
BBC or the new commercial channel, 
struck me as always being on the verge 
of blossoming forth into something 
new, original, and interesting. But the 
blossoming never became a reality. 
You get the feeling this is television as 
it was a few years ago in this country 
— a great medium but yet to begin 
unleashing its full creative powers. 

Most programing on both the 
government-controlled BBC and the 
commercial ITA (Independant Tele- 
vision Authority) stations is live. One 
(Article continues next page) 



31 




LONDON REPORT (Continued) 



reason for this is that each station 
broadcasts an average of only five 
hours a day (except on weekends). 
It is rarely true that more than an 
hour and a half of these five is on 
film. 

The kind of programing to be found 
on British commercial tv is very 
similar to the United States. Indeed 
a good many of our programs have 
been imported for use on the ITA 
station including Liberace, Roy Rog- 
ers, My Hero, Dragnet and / Love 
Lucy. Liberace gets about 50 ratings, 
Rogers 61, My Hero 30, Dragnet 61, 
and Lucy, 63. (These ratings are for 
the London area only and are based 
on the total number of sets converted 
to receive ITA programs. They are 
Nielsen for week ending 15 January.) 

Aside from these U.S. imports some 
of the other film shows include pro- 
grams that are presently being ex- 
ported to the States such as Robin 
Hood (which was sold here by Official 
Films). This program is more popu- 
lar than Dragnet in England. How- 
ever, U.S. -produced film shows will 
never become a dominant part of ITA 
programing as by law 75% of the 
material used must be of British origin. 

While there are these limits now on 
use of U.S. film shows, as the number 
of hours stations program grows, 
there'll be more room for U.S. film. 
The expanding British market may 
permit film producers in this country 
to raise their production budgets with- 
out increasing the cost substantially to 
U. S. advertisers. Reason: They can 



%«r 



hope to recoup through British as well 
as American sales. 

Another possible effect of British 
commercial tv on U.S. television is this. 
There may be more British film shows 
coming to the U.S., giving the adver- 
tiser more programing to pick from — 
and increasing competitive pressure 
among U.S. film syndicators. 

If England blossoms as a program- 
ing source for U. S. television, it may 
well turn out that the American adman 
will travel to London frequently to 
check on properties and look in on pro- 
duction. Of course it's doubtful this 
international traffic will reach the pro- 
portions of current travel to the West 
Coast, but it's a factor to keep in mind 
as British tv grows. 

Another future possibility worth a 
line or two of speculation: What will 
happen when the video tape recorder 
comes into widespread use? Will live 
American shows be taped and sent to 
England? Will we see certain out- 
standing live British tv shows here? 
Though their quality in general is not 
at present likely to make them ap- 
pealing in U.S. markets, live shows in 
England correspond in type to the 
shows most popular in the U.S. 

Live shows consist of drama, re- 
views, panel shows and a few edu- 
cational type programs. The variety 
reviews seem to represnt British tele- 
vision at its best. One of the most pop- 
ular is called Jack Hyltons Supper Club 
and is on Wednesday and Friday eve- 
nings. The set is that of a fashionable 
supper club and the format of the show 




BRITISH TV IS STUDY IN CON- 
TRASTS: RESTRAINED YET SEXY 

With all the talk of British reserve 
you might assume British tv has a 
puritanical air. Actually British seem 
to go much further in permitting night- 
club material with sexy slant or anatomical 
references. Yet at same time British 
shows are restrained in other ways and 
ITA found "People Are Funny," 
went too far in "invading privacy." 



appears to be a cross between our 
Slork Club and Ed Sullivan. 

Interestingly enough, while the Brit- 
ish appear to be over-sensitive to cer- 
tain types of things, (People Are Fun- 
ny was recently censured by ITA offi- 
cials because it was felt that the stunts 
on the show invaded the privacy of 
the home) they are not as sensitive as 
their American cousins to jokes deal- 
ing with sex and anatomy. In one 
evening of watching I found two songs 
on Jack Hylton's Supper Club that 
would never pass U.S. censors. One 
was called "The Lass With The Deli- 
cate Chest" and was about just that, 
and the other told the story of a pen- 
guin sitting on an iceberg and made 
clear reference to several parts of his 
anatomy that were uncomfortable. 

I questioned British programing 
officials about this and was told that 
the BBC had set the precedent for 
material of this type. Someone pointed 
out that, since in England there were 
no sponsors, producers did not have to 
worry about offending anyone and 
thereby making them dislike an ad- 
vertised product. (That is, no spon- 
sors always identified with a single 
program, since advertisers are rotated.) 

Incidentally, ITA programing con- 
tractors have been doing a fine job of 
pleasing the public and all of the 
surveys show that ITA programs are 
generally drawing larger audiences 
than those of the BBC. It is well to 
remember, however, that commercial 
television is still fairly new in Eng- 
land, having been on the air only since 
22 September. The programs them- 
selves are in the hands of two pro- 
graming contractors licensed by the 
Independent Television Authority. One 
of these, Associated-Rediffusion Ltd., 
handles programing in London from 
Monday through Friday; the other, As- 
sociated TeleVision Ltd., is responsi- 
ble for Saturday and Sunday London 
programing. In both places the smell 
of paint is still fresh and much of the 
office area is still unfinished. Every- 
one walks around with the air of a 
couple moving into their brand new 
home in the suburbs and not quite sure 
whether all the appliances work. 

Status today: Where is British com- 
mercial tv today? There are now 
1,500,000 tv sets in the London area 
of which approximately 634,000 are 
capable of receiving ITA programs. 
The number of sets being converted 
and new all-channel sets being bought 

SPONSOR 



DRAMA, PANEL SHOW AND 
VARIETY ARE DOMINANT 



Program types on British com- 
mercial tv are akin to U.S. This 
suggests possibility of eventual 
program interchange. Right now, 
says author, British tv does not 
seem on par with U.S. But me- 
dium just got started commer- 
cially this fall. Panel show pic- 
tured is "What's It All About?" 
Money goes to viewers who 
stump panel. Amount : £10 or $28 





is about 16,000 a week. An average of 
three listeners is credited to each set, 
placing the total number of viewers in 
the neighborhood of 1,500,000. These 
million and a half people have a choice 
of two television programs at any 
given moment. 

One of the first things to note about 
British commercial tv is that the in- 
come per capita is probably higher 
among BBC listeners than ITA listen- 
ers. Reason: the kind of programing 
done by both stations. Generally speak- 
ing, there are more "heavy" type 
shows on BBC than ITA which is striv- 
ing for broad appeal. BBC, while it 



wants to be popular, feels it has to 
educate as well as entertain. 

A look at rate cards of the two pro- 
gram contractors shows that one min- 
ute of peak time (8 to 10 p.m.) on 
weekdays goes for £975. The same 
time on a Sunday night is £1,000. The 
most popular show on Sunday eve- 
nings pulls a rating of about 70 and 
therefore reaches some 443,800 homes. 
This brings the cost-per-1,000 homes 
to approximately £2.3 or $6.30. But 
when all 1,500,000 tv homes in the 
London area are converted to receive 
ITA programs this same program 
ought to reach 1,050,000 of them (if 




the rating stays constant) bringing the 
cost-per-1,000 homes down to about 
$2.66. This is expected to happen by 
early 1957. 

If you want a quick comparison of 
the cost-per-1,000 of the high-rated 
show referred to above with a similar 
U.S. show, consider this : In New York 
City on Sunday night, the show with 
the highest rating has a cost-per-1,000 
per commercial minute of $1.36. The 
highest rated British show on Sunday 
night at $6.30 is thus almost five times 
as expensive. (It's proper to compare 
a cost-per-1,000 per commercial min- 
( Please turn to page 88) 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



33 



• 'AGENCIES SHOULD CREATE 

advertising, not be marketing centers," 
says Mr. X, a hard-driving, outspoken 
adman who has fought his way to the 
top of the Madison Avenue heap. 
Young and aggressive, he's known for 
his pungent comments on advertising 
practices. For obvious reasons, Mr. X 
wishes to remain anonymous. Well 
schooled in all media forms, he gained 
national prominence as the ad mana- 
ger of a large manufacturing concern. 
Like most of his contemporaries, he is 
an exurbanite and lives with his wife 
and family on a farm in Connecticut. 




"I say marketing is malarkef 

Adman says agencymen should stop being frustrated marketing men, 
make clients bigger through better, more creative advertising 



J/_ am an authority on advertising. 
I am an authority to the extent that I 
have earned my living in some form of 
media since I was old enough to work. 
1 have been everything from a news- 
boy to reporter, space salesman to 
promotion writer, ad manager of a 
multi-million dollar firm to an account 
supervisor with one of the top three 
agencies in the nation. 

I say this in modesty. I say it sim- 
ply because I hope you'll feel I have 
sufficient background to sound off on 
one phase of the advertising world that 
bothers me. 

That phase is this so-called market- 
ing revolution. 

Last year everyone on Madison 
Avenue talked about motivational re- 
search. You simply weren't in the 



34 



swim unless you could expound on 
some form of motivation. The house- 
wife just didn't buy Ajax because she 
wanted a clean sink. Not at all. She 
had to be motivated. 

And this motivation was a mys- 
terious thing that was only understood 
by a select few who used it as a 
weapon to embarrass the ordinary ad- 
man who felt Mrs. Housewife bought 
Ajax because of a cracking good ad 
campaign. Last year, as I said, it was 
motivational research. That vogue in 
its extreme character has passed like 



the wide lapels on admen's suits. 

This year it's marketing. 

Every time more than three admen 
gather, one will usually pop up with 
the question as to whether agencies 
are beginning not to be agencies as 
the old-timers knew them, but giant 
marketing outfits that do everything 
for the client except put the cereal in 
the boxes. 

I say this: Agencies were created 
for a specific purpose. And that pur- 
pose was to create advertising. 

As such, an advertising agency has 



Mr. "X" sought, and was given the opportunity to express his views in SPONSOR 
regarding the controversial marketing question. His views are an extreme position. 
SPONSOR will be pleased to carry views of those who differ with Mr. "X." What are 
your thoughts on the "marketing revolution?" Address comments to Editor, SPONSOR, 
40 E. 49 St., New York 17. SPONSOR next issue will print answer to adman's charges. 



SPONSOR 



two specific basic functions: (1) cre- 
ate personality or character for a prod- 
uct and (2) tell as many people as 
possible at the most economical cost. 

Advertising agencies are growing in 
importance and worth to American 
business just as legal counselors, 
comptrollers and bankers, as specific 
advisers, have become vital to the suc- 
cess of any company today. 

But I am sure that the legal counsel 
sticks to the law books and doesn't 
turn up with a storyboard instead of 
a brief, the comptroller doesn't sketch 
out a new ad campaign instead of de- 
tailing the profit and loss statement 
and the banker isn't an authority on 
film commercials. They sell a cor- 
poration that which they are equipped 
to sell, not something they could do 
"if they ever put their mind to it." 

A friend of mine, a vice president 
in charge of merchandising for one 
of the top food processors, had this to 
say recently on the subject of advertis- 
ing agencies: 

"I am amazed at what has hap- 
pened to the account executive in the 
last few months. It used to be that the 
a/e would sit down with you, discuss 
a campaign and detail what it was to 
accomplish, how it would do it. Not so 
today. The a/e stops in and launches 
into a long presentation on what we're 
doing wrong in our merchandising 
approach, why we ought to make the 
icing stiffer, the cherries sweeter and 
the fact that our point-of-sale approach 
was outmoded years ago. In all the 
discussion, the ad campaign that he 
brought along for us to see never quite 
gets out of his briefcase. 

"If this is the new marketing ap- 
proach, I want no part of it. I want 
just plain, ordinary, and if you'll par- 
don the expression, old-fashioned ad- 
vertising." 

Actually, the story isn't far-fetched. 
Let's take an example. 

Leo Burnett is the talk of the adver- 
tising world. His agency took Pills- 
bury 's cake mixes and practically tor- 
pedoed Swansdown. Mr. Burnett has 
been acclaimed a genius. He invaded 
no marketing field. He just made cre- 
ative advertising better so that you 
could practically lift that piece of cake, 
taste the icing. He made you want to 
buy. With deference to Mr. Burnett, 
this isn't genius, it's advertising. 

Same thing goes for Pepsi-Cola. No 
man in his right mind would ever have 
thought that you could buck Coke. 
Pepsi did. And there's hardly a kid 

6 FEBRUARY 1956 



or grown-up in America who can't 
whistle the Pepsi jingle. That's adver- 
tising. 

Same for Piel's Beer, Marlboro 
Cigarets, Jello, Chrysler, Pepsodent, 
Saran Wrap, Ford. You could go on 
page after page, listing those products 
that have been advertised into leader- 
ship. Granted that marketing entered 
the picture, but it was from the client, 
not the agency side. 

Can you imagine an agency todav 
sending a man out to Cincinnati to 
tell Procter & Gamble what they should 
do in the field of marketing? Their 
research facilities would make those 
of any agency look small in compari- 
son. Same with the so-called merchan- 
dising facilities of most agencies. I'm 
sure that P & G wants the best cam- 
paign at the lowest cost. If they get 
these two things, they'll bear the brunt 
of the marketing tasks. 



One large agency vice president I 
queried on marketing had this to say: 

"It's a fad. It will pass. Agencies 
travel in packs if you talk about their 
thinking processes. One hired a mer- 
chandising man. Another figured he 
bad to hire one, too. By the time it got 
around, the story had taken on the 
normal proportions and when the fifth 
agency heard it, five merchandising 
men were hired. Research, packaging 
experts, point-of-sale geniuses and so 
it goes. Once these people are on the 
payroll, they have to be merchandised 
to the client. He's overjoyed as long 
as they stay out of his hair. He figures 
some way he's going to get more for 
his 15%. He's wrong, though. 

"Remember one thing: No ad agen- 
cy that stands high in the marketing 
field but proves incompetent in its 
basic function of creating sound, prod- 
( Please turn to page 80) 







MR. "X" WROTE IN REPLY TO "ADVERTISING 
AGENCY IN TRANSITION" ARTICLES WHICH 
APPEARED IN RECENT ISSUES OF SPONSOR 

1. Why accounts are shifting today (28 Nov.): 

Article detailed reasons for accounts changing agencies, 
emphasized change was largely result of "marketing 
revolution," new concept in agency-client relationship 

2. Marketing: agency tool or cliche? (12 Nov.): 

Advertisers' insistence on broader marketing aid from 
agencies stirs controversial points of view, poses questions 
facing agencies desiring to expand, take marketing tack 

3. The psychiatrist and the account executive (26 Dec): 

A humorous and wholly fictitious account of an account 
executive telling his psychiatrist what is happening to 
old-line account man because of the "marketing revolution" 

4. Did high tv budgets force agency revolution? (9 Jan.) 

Two distinct points of view were taken here to spell out 
what is thinking on "marketing revolution" in today's top 
agencies. Listed also were marketing changes tv created 

► REPRINTS OF "ADVERTISING AGENCY IN TRANSITION" WILL 
SOON BE AVAILABLE. A 16-PAGE REPRINT OF THE FIRST FOUR 
ARTICLES IS NOW IN PREPARATION. SINGLE COPY 35c; 10 TO 49 

copies, 30c each; 50 to 100 copies, 25c each 




GOOD "COMMERCIAL CLIMATE" DERIVES FROM HIGH QUALITY OF SEMI-DOCUMENTARY "CIRCLE THEATRE" SERIES OF STORIES RANGING FRO?I 



Opposite $64,000 question 



You don't need ratings 
to get results, says Armstrong 

Tv show gets good audience response, dealers are enthusiastic over pro- 
grain and sales are up since it began — all despite stiff air-time competition 



WW ould you take the slot opposite 
$64,000 Question? 

All right, put it this way : 
What if another "Question" came 
along this season and sat down beside 
you? 

Just thinking about such a possi- 
bility has all the charms of Russian 
Roulette, some shuddering sponsors 
say. But those who think there's a fair 
chance of finding themeselves looking 
down a gun barrel in 1956 are keenly 
watching the two who've actually pulled 



the 



36 



Armstrong Cork with 



Armstrong Circle Theatre and Pontiac 
with Playwrights '56. They alternate 
in the 9:30-10:30 period on NBC TV 
Tuesdays, facing you-know-who on 
CBS TV during their second half hour. 
Of the two, Armstrong probably 
evoked more head-wagging at the out- 
set because of the nature of its pro- 
gram series, contemporary semi-docu- 
mentaries, in contrast to Pontiac's 
fiction dramas. Here was a think 
piece with somewhat intellectual aspir- 
ations making a bid against the most 
spectacularly successful mass-appeal 



show in television history. It was 
enough to make a sponsor flip his 
Nieslen pocket piece in amazement — - 
and some have been flipping since. 

Actually, Armstrong had committed 
itself — and a budget of well over 
$2 million — (via BBDO) to that time 
slot last spring, months before Question 
debuted in June. (It had had the 
9:30-10:00 slot since 1950 before 
lengthening the show to an hour last 
September.) But by the time the 
Lancaster. Pa. advertiser got under 
way with its series, Question had been 

SPONSOR 




\ M«;ilT IN A HOSPITAL 



on the air three months and was knock- 
ing off Nielsen and Trendex ratings 
over 50. Armstrong's challenge was 
something like little David striding in- 
to the arena to face Goliath, and 
observers who recalled what Stop the 
Music did to Fred Allen on radio seven 
years ago promptly predicted the same 
dire results for Armstrong. 

Now, four months and eight shows 
later, it may be time to take an 
accounting. 

"I'll tell you this," Max Banzhaf, 
Armstrong's advertising director, told 
sponsor, "We could have canceled out 
last month; we had a 60-day escape 
clause. Instead, when NBC asked us, 
we told them we planned to complete 
our contract. And,'' he added, smiling. 
"it wasn't just because the critics like 
the show." 

It certainly wasn't the ratings. Niel- 
sen has been giving it 20 to 28; Tren- 
dex, a low of 7.8 to a 16.5 high. These, 
according to BBDO's tv supervisor for 
the account, Mary Cummings, could 
have been doubled against almost any 
other competition. 

Still, both client and agency feel 
the show is producing results in view 
of the company's objectives. Specifi- 
cally. Banzhaf explains: 1) the show 
is drawing the type of audience they 
want, 2) audience response has been 
highly favorable. 3) the firm's dis- 



tributors are enthusiastic over the pro- 
gram, and 4) sales are up. 

The fact that the quality of the pro- 
gram has been acclaimed in the trade 
is more than just gravy. Armstrong 
has long been associated with a quality 
show I Circle Theatre, in half-hour for- 
mat, since 1950; Theatre of Today on 
radio from 1941 to 1953), wants to 
maintain that tradition. 

"After all," Banzhaf points out, "we 
don't want to be so preoccupied with 
ratings that we miss the real objective 
- people. Ratings, while excellent 
barometers, are really percentages, the 
accuracy of which is subject to con- 
stant debate. Percentages can't buy 
anything. Our audience is composed 
of people, averaging almost seven 
million families, which is a lot of 
"circulation.' 

"Show-wise," he adds, "the program 
provides a good climate for our com- 
mercials. The feeling of fine enter- 
tainment coupled with authenticity, be- 
lievability, and importance, ties in 
directly with the current theme in all 
our flooring advertising: that Arm- 
strong is the leader in the trend toward 
'the modern fashion in floors.' ' 

Armstrong will spend well over 
$7 million in 1956 largely to promote 
that theme, with about $5 million (up 
from $4.2 million in 1955) going for 
time and space media. 

Besides the $2-million-plus for tv, 
the firm will put nearly $2.5 million in 
slick and shelter magazines (American 
Home, Better Homes & Gardens, House 
Beautiful, Woman's Home Companion, 
Ladies Home Journal, Satevepost) and 
trade magazines {Architectural Forum. 
House & Home, etc.). Some of this 
will also go into other general and 
business magazines and a vast assort- 
ment of trade papers in the packaging, 
industrial, and building fields in sup- 
port of the more than 350 other prod- 



ucts made by Armstrong divisions. 
Sunday supplements will get about 
$650,000. Last year supplements were 
used along with spot radio to reach 
farmers in the Midwest and South in 
areas where tv coverage was thin. In 
1956 spot radio has been dropped en- 
tirely and the budget upped in order 
to 1) increase metropolitan area cover- 
age and 2 ) demonstrate color in Ann- 
strong's floorings. Supplements this 
year will probably include American 
Weekly, Parade, and Family Weekly. 

Copy approach. While print media 
with the advantage of color are used 
to play up the beauty of the product, 
television stresses the utilitarian angles. 

For example, a typical full-page, 
process-color ad scheduled to appear 
in American Home and Better Homes 
& Gardens this month and next shows 
a striking entrance hall luxuriously 
appointed with gleaming light fixture, 
side table, full-length mirror — all in 
rich hues — and with Armstrong Cus- 
tom Corlon Tile (vinyl plastic) on the 
floor. The illustration takes up 80% 
of the space. Copy is skillfully worded 
to convey a helpful decorating sugges- 
tion in phrases calculated to emphasize 
the full beauty of the colors. 

By contrast, a typical commercial 
shown during the Christmas season for 
Armstrong's Quaker line of low-cost, 
printed floor coverings opens on a 
young couple trimming their Christmas 
tree. Ornament drops, wife smilingly 
brushes fragments into dust pan and 
empties into basket as announcer Hugh 
James says: ". . . there's nothing in 
your home so easy to keep clean as the 
smooth enamel surface of Armstrong 
Quaker Floor Covering." A few words 
about style and color and back to 
functional copy : "This distinctive style 
is the modern version of those pine 
(Please turn to page 82) 



Pivots behind company's tv campaign are (1. to r.) : Armstrong Ad and Promotion Manager 
Max Banzhaf, BBDO tv supervisor on account Mary Cummings, and Acct. Exec. Roy Dreher 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



37 



There's more to radio 
and Iv research than ratings 



Once research started and stopped with the almighty rating. But there's 
more mature recognition now that more detailed data is essential 



0k nee upon a time somebody called 
up a group of people on the telephone 
and asked them what program they 
were listening to. 

And, lo, the program rating was 
born. 

A lot has happened since then. From 
the simple, single program measure- 
ment, which became a national institu- 
tion under the name Hooperating. 
ways and means of counting heads 
anion" radio-tv audiences have multi- 



plied. But, more important, the facts 
that can be dug up and analyzed from 
raw listening and viewing data have 
piled up in variety and complexity. 

The result: a shift away from reli- 
ance on just program ratings. 

The trend actually started about a 
dozen years ago when the A. C. Nielsen 
Co. introduced the fixed sample to ra- 
dio audience measurement. Covering 
network radio and later network tv, the 
fixed sample via electronic measure- 



WHAT RESEARCH FIRMS DO BEYOND RATINGS 

• ARB: As an example of what rating services offer 
besides per-broadcast rating information, ARB, which 
gathers tv data via the diary method, provides viewers 
per set, audience composition (men, women, children), 
cumulative audience ratings for multi-week programs. 
Other data can also be gotten from its regular report. 

• Nielsen: This firm's local station index, now in 25 
markets, will be in about 50 by year's end. Agency 
subscribers can get, by quarter hours, total station 
listening, four-week cumulative audience, listeners or 
viewers per set, number of times each home sees or 
hears program over four-week period, auto sets-in-use. 

• Pulse: Starting this year Pulse has gotten figures 
on cumulative station audiences, both radio and tv. 
These are given by six-hour periods, by day and by 
week. Out of this data can come overlap of audiences 
by stations. Pulse also provides audience composition, 
average number of people tuned in per home per hour. 




38 



ment, enabled Nielsen to come up with 
cumulative audience figures and such 
allied data as audience turnover, gross 
impressions, un duplicated homes 
leached, etc. 

Late in 1954, the Nielsen Station In- 
dex began supplying these figures on a 
local basis. Though the first NSI fig- 
ures created a small-scale tempest 
among radio stations, the service is 
being used more and more by agencies 
and stations. ( For details on this tem- 
pest and how NSI works, see "NSI: 
Can it measure today's radio audi- 
ence?" sponsor, 18 April 1955.) 

Nielsen, of course, is not the only 
one providing more than just local 
program ratings to advertisers. Early 
last year Pulse began supplying week- 
ly and daily cumulative data on sta- 
tion circulation. And ARB's local tv 
diary reports, which cover a week of 
viewing, provide the basis for cumula- 
tive audience on weekday strips. Both 
ARB and Pulse supply audience com- 
position facts regularly. And the list 
does not end there. 

In addition, all these services offer 
to break out special information for 
advertisers and also make special 
studies on request. 

From the point of view of the num- 
ber of facts available, NSI reports 
cover a broad area. For example, let's 
take a quarter-hour morning segment 
on a western radio station and list the 
kinds of NSI data timebuyers are now 
working with. The program is John 
Harvey on KGO, San Francisco. The 
period is the average weekday 7:45- 
8:00 a.m. segment. The time is last 
season. 

First of all, users of NSI have two 
sets-in-use figures to work from. One 
(Please turn lo page 96) 

SPONSOR 



HOW ADDING RADIO STATIONS AFFECTS HOMES REACHED 



29.5% 



of radio homes are 
hit with 24 anncts. 
on one am station 




of radio homes are 
hit with 56 anncts. 
on two am stations 




of radio homes are 
hit with 77 anncts. 
on three am stations 



of radio homes are 
hit with 92 anncts. 
on four am stations 



Chart above shows example of data agencies are now using 
from Nielsen Station Index reports. Figures cover weekly 
schedule of client in one market, show four-week unduplicated 



homes reached in March 1955. Note new homes added by 
advertiser level off with fourth station. However, with 
leveling off comes added frequency of message in each home 



..... .., ,; , ;i; 



HOW VARYING TV SCHEDULE AFFECTS TV HOMES REACHED 




of tv homes are 
hit with 13 anncts 
on one tv station 



of tv homes are 
hit with 1 8 anncts. 
on same tv station 






of tv homes are 

hit with 24 anncts. 

on two tv stations 



of tv homes are 

hit with 32 anncts. 

on two tv stations 



I 



This chart is identical to that above but analyzes tv, 
looks at client's weekly tv schedule in different ways. 
NSI points up fact that with high initial homes-reached 



figure, added homes come slowly. But, as noted above, 
this is offset by added frequency of message per home. 
Frequency above is, 1. to r.. 8.0. 9.9. 10.5, 11.1 



HOW DIFFERENT RADIO-TV BUYS OVERLAP HOMES REACHED 



C ES REACHED #O.D /O 

> NLY HH 4.1 % 



89.5% 

14.9% 



■ 



., 



TV 
VDIO 






25.4% 



26.3% 



_ 



' INLY 





Each bar above is combination of two bars directly above it. 
All percentage figures are based on all radio homes in 
area, show that maximum buy (124 announcements weekly 



99.0° 




HOMES REACHED 
10.6% RADIO C 



63.3% BOTH TV AND RADIO 



25.1 % TV ONL> 




on six radio-tv stations) reaches practically every radio 
home in market during four-week period. The frequency 
per home rises from 11.2 in first bar to 16.3 in last 




Robert Hall fils $3 million into ti 

Pipe racks from little antennas grow as clothier channels 60% of 1956 a elver 4 



•• 



^ou don't open 10 to 20 new 
stores a year without leaning heavih 
on spot radio and television," says 
Jerry Bess. "And when you launch 
20 in the space of a single week, that's 
the only kind of blasting powder with 
enough kick in it to do the job." 

He should know. As vice-president 
of Frank B. Sawdon Inc., New York, 
agency for Robert Hall, he directs the 
radio-tv strategy of the largest, prob- 
ably the fastest-growing chain of fami- 
ly clothing stores in the country. The 
company already has 202 outlets from 
Massachusetts to California, will up 
the total to 222 by 1 March (adding 
20 in Los Angeles, St. Louis. Fort 
Worth and San Antonio), and will 
count on air media to carry the pro- 
motion ball most of the way. 

sponsor estimates Robert Hall's 
over-all 1956 ad budget at close to $5 
million, including $3 million for air 
media and $2 million for newspapers. 

To toot the expansion in the four 
markets concerned, the clothier will 
step up the tv-radio share of its ad 
budget to 70 r v during the next three 
or four months. 

Robert Halls reliance on radio and 
tv to do the big job in promoting this 
current expansion reflects the firm's 
long-rooted attitude toward ad media 
in general. Says Bess: 

"Obviously, we need fast name 
identification in these new markets. 
Radio and especially television, we've 



found, are the fastest ways to get it. 

"More than that : it holds on to 
your customers in your older, estab- 
lished markets. Sure, we're opening 
with a terrific barrage in these four 
markets and well keep it up until the 
hot weather sets in, say still June or 
July. But when we taper off, we still 
won't drop below 75% of this sched- 
ule throughout the rest of the vear. 
We'll cut down on newspapers much 
faster." 

In the Los Angeles area, where 12 
units (the chain's first in that city) 
open 1 March: several hundred radio 
announcements (via KLAC, KMPC. 
KNX. KGIL. KXLA, KFOX. and 
KPOLl and 60 tv (via KRCA, KABC- 
TV, and KTTV I . Also, some short 
music and news programing and por- 
tions of d.j.'s. 

In St. Louis, which gets its first 
four units 1 March too: over 200 ra- 
dio announcements (via KSD. WIL. 
WEW. KXOKl and 25 tv (via KSD- 
TVl. 

In the Fort Worth area (two new- 
units replacing an old one) : some 75 
radio ( via KFJZ ) and 45 tv I via 
KFJZ-TV, WBAP-TV, and KRLD-TV ) . 

In San Antonio ( also two new units 
to replace an old one I : 60 radio, (via 
KENS and KONO I and 28 tv l via 
KENS-TV and WOAI-TV I . 

Newspapers will be used in con- 
junction with this blast, of course, 
but again in proportion to the over-all 



budget, which allows 70' '< for air 
media and 30 r r for the dailies in con- 
junction with these openings. 

Broken down, the $3 million ( spon- 
sor's estimate I for air media will in- 
clude $2 million for tv and nearly $1 
million for radio. 

Talk about saturation! Starting 20 
February, Robert Hall's spring sched- 
ule calls for a build-up to over 8,000 
radio and 2.000 tv announcements a 
week — mostly minutes — on over 225 
stations from coast to coast. 

All of which adds up the fact that 
Robert Hall. Number 1 in the family 
clothing business, is also the largest 
user of retail radio and television 
1 130 markets on a 52-week basis ) . 

If that's a coincidence, it's an awful- 
ly stubborn one: it's been around for 
\ears. Actually. Robert Hall is an 
advertising anomalv in the retail field 
with its adherence to air media in 
preference to print. But its 15 years 
of experience — the first eight with ra- 
dio only — have convinced both client 
and agency that 1 I the way to sell 
clothing is by means of frequency 
impact and 2) the strongest impact 
comes from a combination of eye and 
ear media working together. 

Which may explain why the com- 
pany has been quick to cover itself 
with tv during the past five years 
while remaining a dyed-in-the-wool 
radio fan. Until 1950 Robert Hall had 
had no tv experience, was spending 



40 



SPONSOR 



4- 



P rt«X fuL t} Trf££ ftr£. 



$*$ U j~imh7 ^fy 



\iV\>^ 




ROBERT HALL 



CLOTHE! 



rnfln \ % 






r ■* r ,> : * ! J * 




Jin pattern 



£»t to broadcast media 



well over $1.5 million on spot radio 
and almost the same in newspapers. 
That year it tried on 15 markets for 
size, liked the fit, and expanded to 30 
by 1953. Last year it used close to 
60 and will be in some 75 in 1956. 

Thus, from a budget that was 55% 
radio, 45% newspapers, and 0% tv 



five years ago, the firm has gone to 
one that is 20' < radio. 40' < news- 
papers and 40% tv. 

Still, while the total ad budget has 
increased with the expansion of the 
chain during the past five years, the 
radio budget has remained the same. 
I How much radio you can buy in 
1955 as compared with 1950 — and 
with 1950 dollars — is hard to say.) 
The fact remains that both radio and 
newspapers have made considerable 
way for the newer medium, fatter 
budget notwithstanding. 

Why? Says Bess: "First of all, we 
look at each market separately. And 
we figure the budget for each market 
on its own merits: population, number 
of stores in area, buying power, past 



Current expansion is pinpointed by Vice President Jerome Bess < left J and Timebuyer 
James Hackett i>f Robert Hall agency 'Frank B. Spwdon). They're discussing radio-tv buys 
in Los Angeles. St. Louis. Fort Worth and San Antonio markets where clothier will open 20 
new -lore- between 23 February. 1 March with saturations of 1.000 announcements a week 




sales, competition, etc. Once we know 
what we're after in each one we can 
go ahead and plan. Basically we want 
1.) speed, 2.) impact, and 3.) recog- 
nition. 

You cant get all this by taking a 
modest budget and spreading it thin. 
Where a market cannot afford all 
three media — radio, tv and newspa- 
pers — we use two, whichever give us 
the best combination for that particu- 
lar market. Some markets justify only 
one medium. We cut it accordingly. 
Usually the one that remains is either 
radio or television. 

"So if we have any guideposts, or 
formula, it is this: 

"1. We do very little institutional 
selling. Except for our signature use 
of jingles, we use our air time to sell 
specific items. That means more than 
just a bare description and price. We 
sell Fashion. Quality, and, most of all, 
Value. And, in the retail field you can 
tell how good your advertising is 
pretty fast. If they don't come in vol- 
ume each week and ask for the item, 
you struck out. Television is faster 
than radio on that score. Of course 
we don't overlook the value of the 
cumulative results of radio and tv. 

""2. Another thing we must get is 
impact. Make "em remember the name 
and the item. Newspapers have the 
advantage of letting the customer keep 
the actual listings to refer to — if he 
remembers to look at the ad. Radio, 
on the other hand, reminds him, over 
and over again. Tv not only reminds 
him but takes it out and shows it to 
him, over and over again. 

"3. Come the weekend, the news- 
papers begin getting much too crowd- 
ed with ads. beginning way back on 
Wednesday and going on through 
Thursday and Friday. There's only 
so much air time. If we get the right 
(Please turn to page 100) 

41 




K DUB-TV 

LUBBOCK, TEXAS 
K P A R - T V 

SWEETWaTER-ABILENE, TEXAS 

K D U B -AM 

LUBBOCK, TEXAS 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES: THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



President and Gen. Mgr., W. D. "DUB" ROGERS 
National Sales Mgr. E. A. "Buzz" Hajsett 




See: Louisville Savings and Loan Associa- 

tion credits radio with growth 

Issue: 2 January 1950, page 28 

Subject: Bank credits radio for its growth 



That savings institutions can realize handsome results from radio 
and tv advertising is constantly illustrated by reports that reach 
SPONSOR from such institutions. The latest praise for the effectiveness 
of the air media comes from the Greater Louisville First Federal 
Savings and Loan Assoication of Louisville, Kentucky. Upon being 
presented with a gift and scroll for his leadership in the use of 
broadcasting as an advertising medium, Gustav Flexner, executive 
vice president and secretary of L. S. & L. said, "I have great faith 
in radio and television, I know they bring business in, and that is 
why I have been so consistent in my broadcasting advertising over 
the years." 

Mr. Flexner s bank has been a regular user of radio advertising 
for 31 years and has used the services of WAVE-TV since 1948. 
Since that date the bank's resources have more than doubled to 
the presnt figure of $70,000,000. Last year's increase alone was 
$16,000,000. 

Besides a schedule of announcements on 7 local radio stations. 
L. S. & L. regularly sponsors Bill Gladden and The Weather (Monday 
through Friday, 6-6:05 p.m.) with a one minute weather summary 
on Sundays at 6 p.m. It also sponsors a one minute cut-in on Today 
during the first 10 days of each month. During that 10 day period, 
depositors can earn interest as if their accounts had been started on 
the first of the month. 

For special campaigns the bank buys individual programs and 
announcements. 

A series of radio and tv programs directed toward younger finan- 
ciers has attracted $1,000,000 in children's savings accounts. These 
are part of a special feature of Louisville Savings and Loan's savings 
program known as The Savings Post, now in its fifth year. 



Mr. Sponsor 

15 November 1954, p. 18 

Subject: Singer Sewing Machine ad director 
discusses radio-tv campaign 

A little over a year ago the Singer Sewing Machine Company was 
spending 35% of its advertising budget on CBS television's Four 
Star Playhouse. At that time Harold H. Horton, who was then 
Singer's Advertising Director, told sponsor that tv's ability to demon- 
strate a product like Singer's in actual use made it the ideal medium 
for the product. "The demonstration really sells it," he said. Since 
then Singer has not increased its ad budget except to meet increased 
rates brought about by a growing audience. It still sponsors the 
Playhouse, now in its fourth year, and, in the words of Singer's new- 
ad director Mr. G. L. Newcomb. the Playhouse is "very, very success- 
ful, or we wouldn't be continuing. Our rating through 1955 was very 
encouraging."' 

Currently the Playhouse is carried on approximately 125 CBS 
stations accounting for the largest piece of the Singer ad budget. 
On 2 January Singer launched its $125,000 adult sewing contest in 
newspaper ads throughout the country and on 19 January gave it 
a sendoff via Four Star Playhouse. Although the number of retail 
outlets and the number of Singer service trucks has remained 
constant, sales have apparently gone well ahead of what they were 
over a year ago. Mr. Newcomb says the credit goes to tv. * * * 




42 



SPONSOR 




MEMPHIS 



has been worth waitincpfor! 



At last viewers and advertisers alike are receiving the 
benefits of the choicest spot on the Memphis TV dial 
. . . Channel 3, WREC-TV . . . affording the ultimate 
in coverage and reception for the great $2 Billion Mid- 
South market. 

WREC-TV brings to Channel 3 the standards of excel- 
lence and the "know-how" that have consistently kept 
WREC-Radio Number 1 on Memphis radio survey after 
survey by Hooper, Pulse and S.A.M.S. ! 

With WREC-TV and Channel 3 comes a full basic affilia- 
tion with the CBS Television Network. No wonder, adver- 
tisers and viewers alike find Channel 3, WREC-TV , first 
choice in Memphis. See your Katz man soon! 



Operating with full power from the 
highest antenna in the Mid-South 
. . . 1349 feet above mean sea level. 



WREC-TV 

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE 



Represented Nationally by The Katz Agency 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



43 



r. 




All recognized market coverage services give WSYR 
a wide margin of superiority over competitor sta- 
tions. Take Neilsen for example: 







The Measure of a Great Radio Station 



Daytime, WSYR's weekly circulation of 193,530 
homes is from 47% to 212% better than any other 
Syracuse station's. Nighttime, WSYR's circulation 
of 132,540 homes is from 46% to 257% better. 




5KW • 570 KC 





docal — in Central New York. 

A/SYR market has a population of over 1.5 
■ n — and annual buying power in excess of 
Sbillion. And remember: metropolitan Syracuse 
: ked by Sales Management as America's finest 
t narket. 



Effective daytime service 
area, as measured by 
Nielsen Coverage Service 



i i a t e 





SYRACUSE, N. Y. 



Represented Nationally by 
THE HENRY I. CHRISTAL CO., INC. 

NEW YORK • BOSTON • CHICAGO 
DETROIT • SAN FRANCISCO 



' 



WI Mil 



SI 



ratings i ttf 



Chart covers half-hour syndicated film 





Past* 
rank 






Top 10 shows in 10 or more markets 
Period 7-7 December 7955 

TITLE, SYNDICATOR. PRODUCER. SHOW TYPE 


Average 
ratings 


7-STATION 
MARKETS 


5-STATION 
MARKETS 


4-STATION MARKETS 


J-STfl a 
MARI • 


Rank 


NY L.A. 


Boston 


Mnnls. S. Fran. 


Atlanta 


Seattle- 
Chicago Detroit Tacoma Wash. 


Bait. Bui: 


I 


1 
1 1 


Mr. District Attorney, Ziv (M) 


20.9 
18.9 
16.2 
17.5 
17. S 


72.5 

knxt 
10-OOpm 


26.7 

wnar-tv 
10:30pm 


77.4 76.7 

kstp-tv kron-tv 
10:30pm 10:30pm 


waga-tv 
10:30pm 


78.7 20.7 

wwj-tv king-tv 

8:30pm 9:00pm 


75.2 2; 

wbal-tv wipj 
10:'30pm 7:'B 


2 


3 


Waterfront, MCA Roland Reed (A) 


7.7 73.7 

wabd kttv 
7:30pm 7:30pm 


79.9 

wnac-tv 

7:00pm 


9.9 23.5 

kevd-tv krnn-tr 
8:00pm 8:30pm 


75.5 

waga-tv 
7:00pm 


9.5 73.7 20.2 22.7 

wgn-tv wjw-tv komo wtop-tv 
9:00pm 10 -30pm R'30pm 10:30pm 


72.2 2(1 

wmar-tv we 1 
10:30pm 7:(l 


3 


7 


linos 'n' Andy, CBS Film (C) 


5.4 7 7.4 

"■rhs-tv kn\t 
2:00pm 5 '30pm 


72.8 

wnac-tv 
'i :30pm 


9.6 

weeo-tv 

10:45pm 


77.5 

waga-tv 
7:00pm 


26.7 9.7 75.5 

whkh wwj-tv wtop-tv 
9:30pm 7 00pm 7:30pm 


< 
1:S 


4 


5 


Badge 714, NBC Film (D) 


6.7 76.9 

wpix kttv 
* :30pm 7 '30pm 


20.8 

uriae- tv 
6:30pm 


23.2 27.9 

kstp-tv kpix 
9:30pra 9:00pm 


76.2 9.5 22.2 76.2 

wgn-tv wwj-tv king-tv wrp iv 
8:00pm 7:00pm 030pm 7 00pm 




4 


5 


flighted!/ Patrol, Ziv (A) 


70.7 9.9 

wrra-tv kttv 
7:00pm 9:00pm 


77.2 

\vb'/-tv 
10 30pm 


72.9 70.2 

weeo-tv krnn-tv 
10:00pm 11:00pm 


73.2 

waga-tv 
7:30pm 


8.9 79.7 73.0 72.7 

wbkb wjhk-tv komo wtop-tv 
9:00pro 10:30pm 7:00pm 7:30pm 


9.5 7< 

wmar-tv wg 
7:30pm 10:: 


6 


\ 


Doug. Fairbanks Presents, ABC Film (D) 


17.3 


76.4 77.5 

■vroa-tv k*-ca 
'0:30pni 10:30pro 




7.5 

kstp-tv 
6:00pra 


7.7 8.7 

wbkb wxyz-tv 
10:00pm 10:00pm 


7( 

ffbl 

10: 


6 


2 


f Led Three Lives, Ziv (M) 


17.3 
17.1 
18.0 
18.3 


3.7 72.3 

wpix kttv 
'0:00pm 8 30pm 


27.9 

wnac-tv 

7:00pm 


27.5 76.7 

kstp-tv kren-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 


74.2 

wsb-tv 
7 00pm 


77.4 78.3 77.6 76.7 

wgn-tv wjbk-tv ktnt-tv wrc-tv 
930pm 10:30pm 10:00pm 10:30pm 


77.9 2, 

wbal-tv wi 

10:30pm 10: 


8 


4 


Ulan Behind the Badge, MCA-TV Film (M) 




24.0 

wnac-tv 
10:30pm 


4.0 14.5 

kstp-tv kron-tv 
5:30pm 10:30pm 


76.7 8.4 9.7 

wjbk-tv king-tv wmal-tv 

10:3Upm 10:!Spm 10:30pm 


2 

WI 

8 


9 




Amite Oakley, CBS Film (W) 


8.8 74.3 

•chs-tv kttv 
3 :30pm 7:00pm 


2.9 

wniur 
0:00pm 


23.0 7.9 

weeo-tv kgo-tv 
4:00pm 6 :30pm 


73.2 

wlwa 
6:00pm 


70.4 9.7 79.6 72.0 

wbbm-tv wxyz-tv king-tv wtop-tv 
5:00pm 6:00pm C :00pm 7:00pm 


23.2 2: 

wbal-tv wb 
5:30pm 7:C 


10 


8 


Superman (Flamingo) (K) 


77.7 77.3 

wrca-tv kttv 
fl :00pm 7:00pm 


22.7 

wnac-tv 
6:30pm 


9.9 77.7 

wtcn-tv kgo-tv 
6:30pm 6:30pm 


23.2 

wsb-tv 

7:00pm 


76.2 75.2 77.7 75.3 

wbkb wxyz-tv king-tv wrc-tv 
5:00pm 6:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 


76.7 2- 

wbal-tv wb 
7:00pm 7:1 
















Rank 


Past- 
rank 


Top 70 shows in 4 to 9 markets 














'1 


Life of Biley. NBC Film, Tom McNight (C) 


18.7 


75.9 

kttv 
8:30pm 




74.2 22.2 

ksto-tv kpix-tv 
6:00pm 7:00pm 




73.2 28.2 

wnha kine-tv 
0:00pm 7:30pm 




2 




Stars of the Grcttid Ole Opry, Flamingo Film 


17.9 
17.5 
17.0 
15.3 
15.2 


3.3 

kcop 
8:30pm 


7.2 78.7 

keyd-tv kpix-tv 
0:30ph 9:30pra 


74.2 

waga-tv 
7:00pm 


7.2 

komo 
6 :00pm 




.1 




Celebrity Playhouse, Screen Gems Inc. (D) 


77.7 

knxt 
10:00pm 


72.4 

10:00pm 
krontv 


9.2 74.0 

7:00pm 8:30*>m 
wwj-tv komo 




4 


1 2 


Passport to Danger, ABC Film, Hal Roach (A) 


5.2 

kenp 
7:30pm 




5.5 75.9 

keyd-tv kpix-tv 
7:30pm 7:<i0pm 


8.5 

king-tv 
10:45pm 




5 




Long John SiIrt?r,CBS Film (A) 


5.3 

wahd 
8:00cm 




70.5 

wsb-tv 

6:00pm 


70.9 

whkli 
2:00pm 




6 




!riy Hero, Official Films Inc. (C) 


2.7 

wpix 

S :30pm 


8.2 

wnac-tv 

2:00pm 


4.8 

wtcn-tv 
1 :00pm 


70.8 

0:00pm 
komo 




7 


1 7 


meet Corliss Archer, Ziv (C) 


14.7 






7.2 

wjbk-tv 
7:00pm 


7 7.9 

wbal-tv wt-tN 
6:00pm 7:M 


8 


| 1 


Eddie Cantor, Ziv (C) 


14.2 
13.9 


6.7 

kttv 
10:00pm 


6.0 76.7 

wtcn-tv kron-tv 
9:30pm 10:00pm 


73.7 77.2 75.3 

mihq wjbk-tv king-tv 
9:30pm 10:30pm 10:00pm 


70.9 

wbal-tv 
10:30pm 


9 


1 ' 


f Search for Adventure, Bagnall (A) 


2.2 72.2 

wpix kcop 
7:30pm 7:30pm 


27.5 

kpix-tv 
7:30pm 


79.8 

king-tv 
7:00pm 






1 




10 


Racket Squad, ABC Film (M) 


12.1 


3.6 7.7 

wabc-tv kttv 
10:30pm 8:30pn 


73.5 5.9 

kstp-tv kgo-tv 
10:30pm 8:30pm 


74.2 

wsb-tv 
7:00pm 


76.5 

wgn 
8:30pm 


1 



Show type symbols: (A) adventure: (C) comedy; (D) drama; (Doc) documentary; (K) kids; 
(M) mystery; (Mul musical; (SF) Science Fiction; (W) Western. Films listed are syndicated, 
half-hour length, telecast In four or more markets. The average rating is an unweighted average 
"* individual market ratings listed above. Blank space Indicates film not broadcast in this 



market 1-7 December. While network shows are fairly stable from one month to ano T il 
markets in which they are shown, this is true to much lesser extent with syndicated ."J* 
should be borne in mind when analyzing rating trends from one month to another in M 
•Refers to last month's chart. If blank, show was not rated at all in last chart or n IB < 



I! 



stow 



mi 

ait made tor tv 



S TION MARKETS 



2-STATION MARKETS 



s Mil* Phila. St. L Birm. Charlotte Dayton New. Or. 



I 75.4 7 7.0 23.7 

■kv wtmj-tv nptz ksil-tv 
8fi 11:00pm iO:3D|im 10:00pm 



20.2 77.4 78.7 

wtmj-tv wcau-tv kuk-tv 
10:00pm 6:30pm 10:00pm 



58.8 75.0 32.0 



wbtv wlw-d 
8:00pm 10:30pm 



wdsu-tv 
10:30pm 



22.0 57.3 



70.2 24.4 



wonu-tv 
7:00pm 



k=.l-tv 
9 30pm 



73.7 70.0 79.4 



wtmt-tv 
10:30pm 



wfll-tv 
10:30pm 



k«k-tv 
9:30pm 



75.5 

wxlx 

10:00pm 



76.9 

ksd-tv 
9:30pm 



77.4 7 7.4 20.2 



wtmt-tv 
10:30pra 



irrnu-tv 
7 -00pm 



ksrt-tv 

10:00pm 



25.9 

wtmj-tv 
7:30pm 



76.0 

ksrt-tv 
10:00pn 



70.2 9.9 



wisn-tv 
3:00pm 



"•ran-tv 
3:00pm 



h iv 



70.5 76.2 70.3 



wtsn-tr 
6:30pra 



wcau-tv 
7:00pm 



kort-tv 
5 :30pm 



uaht 
i :30pm 



uhtv 
8:30pm 



23.5 


37.0 






unrc-tv 
10 :00pm 


wbtv 
1 :00pm 






29.0 




24.8 




ibrc-tv 
n :00pm 




wnjo-tv 
l" 30nm 




22.8 


37.5 


34.3 


40.5 


« hrc-tv 

looopm 


wbtv 
10:30pm 


ivhlo-tv 

9 00pm 


wdsu-tv 
innonm 



25.0 


29.8 


waht 
9:30pm 


wl"--d 
9 :30pm 




26.5 




wnm-tT 
9:30pm 



72.5 52.8 

whv-d wd«u-tv 
7:00pm 9:30pm 

5.3 

wjmr-tv 

8 :30pni 



76.0 36.8 78.8 27.0 



«b*-c-tv 
6:00pm 



wbtv wlw-d 
5:30pm 6:00pm 



ud'u-tv 
12:00n 



34.3 70.8 26.8 



wbtv 
5:30ptr 



wlw-d 

6:00pm 



wdsu-tv 

", IIIIMIII 



20.2 

ksd-tv 
9:45pm 



2 9 26.7 70.7 

rt-tv wtmj-tv wcau-tv 
l:)m 8:00pm 10:30pm 



7 

b tv 

: irn 



22.2 7.2 



wtmi-tv 
9:30pm 



wptz 
6:00pm 



79.5 

wabt 
9 :30pm 

28.3 

■vbvc-tv" 

9:00pm 

28.0 

•l»T-l\ 

9:30pm 

75.8 

wb^c-tv 
3:00pm 


42.3 

wbtv 

6:00pm 


37.0 

wdsu-tv 

5:00pm 




35.0 

ftrdsil-tv 

10:00pm 






34.0 

wbtv 

5 :30pm 




49.3 

UlltV 

10:00pm 


24.8 

wbtv 
1 :30pm 


33.5 

wdsu-tv 
10:00pm 





23.0 7.3 

whlo u'jmr-tv 
7:00pm 9:30pm 



?0 Classification as to number of stations In market Is Pulse's 
5C ." e,crm ' rie s number by measuring which stations are actually 
B f homes in the metropolitan area of a given market even though 
i elf may be outside metropolitan area of the market. 



ONE 

will get you... 




WTAR-TV 

is the only "V" Station 

for not one but five 

lusty Markets, all 

within its Grade "A" 

signal . . . reaches an 

area with effective 

buying income 

of over $2,241,000,000* 



Effective Buying Income* 



NORFOLK 
PORTSMOUTH 
NEWPORT NEWS 
WARWICK 
HAMPTON 




$675,950,000 

$129,976,000 

$63,641,000 

$81,116,000 

$197,962,000 

CHANNEL 



3 



NORFOLK.VA. 



Represented by Edward PETRY & Co., Inc. 

(Sales Management Sunny of Buying Power, May 10, 1955) 



1 ONE OR BOTH 

fo open a bigger sales door 
in the Detroit Area! 




C K L W 
radio covers 
a 15,000,000 
population area 
in 5 important 
states. The lowest 
cost major station 
buy in the Detroit 
area. 



800 kc. Radio 
50,000 Watts 

J. E. Campeau, Pres. 
Guardian Bldg., Detroit 



Channel 
325,000 Watts 

National Rep. 
Adam J. Young, Jr., Inc. 




a torum on questions of current interest 
to air advertisers and their agencies 



How can air media and department stores 
work more effectively together 



ITS A THREE-FOLD JOB 

• Five years ago, about a third of 
department stores were using radio, 
mostly the wrong way. This year, well 
over half are using radio consistently 
as a strong supplementary medium — 
averaging better than 100 minutes of 
announcements and/or program time 
per week. These stores today repre- 
sent local radios third best customer. 
A lot more needs to be done, how- 
ever, in bringing together department 
stores and radio advertising by a lot 
of people. 

1. By the radio stations: A reliza- 
tion that department stores take more 
selling and much more servicing (once 
they're sold) than any other type ad- 
vertiser. RAB can provide stations 
with half a hundred different sales 
tools to help them sell radio to depart- 
ment stores; but the continually pains- 
taking matching of merchandise and 
time slot, the careful creation of effec- 
tive copy, the constant week-to-week 
schedule revision and the meaningful 
merchandising cooperation that has to 
be done is up to the stations themselves. 

2. By the department stores: A 
willingness to break out of a 100-year- 
old advertising pattern. This inevita- 
bly involves shifts in store advertising 
personnel duties, from the established, 
comfortable set-up. 

3. By local advertising agencies: A 
number of excellently conceived de- 
partment store radio campaigns today 
are being sadly mishandled and in 
possible danger of cancellation be- 
cause agencies involved have no con- 
cept of what the store's trying to do. 
Many have made no effort to find out. 
The stakes are pretty big; it's worth 
finding out. 

R. David Kimble 

Dir. Local Sales & Service 

Radio Advertising Bureau. Inc. 

New York City 



48 



LEARJS HOW TO USE TELEVISION 

• Air media and department stores 
have always been together — right from 
the start. As a matter of fact, a 
substantial number of the original 
broadcasting stations were owned by 
department stores. Some of these de- 
partment stores throughout the United 
States have used the broadcasting 
media from their earliest days as 
vehicles in promoting the sale of 
merchandise. 

Unfortunately, we older retail sales 
promotion managers grew up and were 
educated in our advertising knowledge 
during a print media period. This is 
the knowledge we transmitted when we 
taught those who followed us in our 
jobs. This means that most store pro- 
moters have never really learned how 
to use television to best advantage — 
for example, the actual mechanics of 
writing, demonstrating and perform- 
ing. 

An educational-type program is 
needed in order to get more department 
stores into television. Broadcasters in- 
dividually must do their parts in their 
own circles. 



However, the Television Bureau of 

Advertising, through its new Retail 

Sales Division, will definitely set the 

pace nationally for such a program. 

Howard Abrahams 

Director of Retail Sales 

Television Bureau of Advertising 

New York City 

WE PERSUADED THE TOP MAN 

• Our biggest account is London's, 
Attleboro's largest department store. 
Perhaps in giving the reasons for our 
happ\ situation will I best be able to 
answer the question. 

First, you must find a department 
store head who's willing to be shown. 

Secondly, you must persuade him 
that certain fixed ideas about using 
radio should have been discarded 
about 30 years ago. One is the ever- 
recurring expression : "Well, radio 
may be ok for selling store name, insti- 
tutional advertising, or bargain base- 
ment sales, but you can't sell regular 
merchandise." This simply isn't true. 

When our client first went on the 
air, he'd take only 10-second station 



\ ital question on department stores is answered by a store executive, 
station ad manager, two industry spokesmen Views range from pessimism to 
what one feels is a definite solution to a problem as old as the broadcast media 




breaks. So I made up a simple jingle 
to a bouncy tune. Before the year was 
out, it was reported to the client that 
mothers of newborn babies were croon- 
ing the jingles to their babies. Who 
ever heard of anyone singing some- 
thing they'd read? 

Next, we went to work to convince 
this valued client that we were not 
doing the job for him we could do if 
he would spend enough money to allow 
us to follow the jingle with a selling 
commercial to move specific items. 

In selling radio, we believe in it 
and are willing to stick our necks out. 
If more radio stations would adopt a 
similar attitude the problem of get- 
ting department stores to use radio 
would be greatly lessened. 

William A. Dawson, Jr. 

Advertising Manager 

WARA 

Attleboro, Mass. 

AIR MEDIA LIMIT OUR MESSAGE 

• It is the general feeling of our 
store personnel that there has been 
progress in bringing air media and 
department stores together, but we feel, 
too, that this progress has been limited. 

We cannot move more than one item 
at a time successfully through radio 
and/or television, a fact that brings 
up our second and main criticism. 

We, and many other department 
stores, are of the opinion that radio 
and tv are too expensive. Since we can 
only advertise one item at a time, we 
feel that we're not getting the impact. 

With newspapers, we may advertise 
a great many articles, knowing that the 
reader will have time to go through 
the ad, read it as much as he likes. 

With radio or tv, however, once the 
message is given, if the listener hasn't 
caught all of it, it's down the drain. 
It's been expensive, and we've only 
been able to give a one-item pitch. 

Unfortunately, since I'm not an offi- 
cial spokesman for the company, the 
name of the store can't be mentioned. 
But if it were printed, your readers 
would recognize the fact that we are 
one of the biggest New York depart- 
ment store advertisers in all media. 

Nevertheless, we do have these criti- 
cisms of the air media. Perhaps it's 
the reason for our keeping so much 
of our budget in newspapers. 

Asst. Public Relations Director 

A large department store 

New York City 



c ^ oH ' N '*, 



£ < 




% 

'{ * — 






T 




"v 



s your TARGET- 
cJLeA WITH 



AIM FOR 



R Wo 





GREATER CLEVELAND'S NUMBER 1 STATION 




fcho mx$MC hofg ay, ' 
WW Radio. WmiSt 

fodMfe CBS Radio/ 






6 FEBRUARY 1956 



49 




LOCAL LIVE 





NOON NEWS 13.1 

NOON WEATHER 12.7 
LADIES' FARE (12:30-1:30 P.M.) 8.3** 

6:00 P.M. NEWS 26.2 

6:20 P.M. WEATHER 25.8 

10:00 P.M. NEWS AND SPORTS 32.5 

10:20 P.M. WEATHER 28.2 

* NOV. 1955 ARB M-F average 
♦♦Special ARB Jan. 3-9, 1956 

See your Katz man for availabilities 






WKY- TV 



NBC 
ABC 



OKLAHOMA CITY 



The Nation's FIRST COLOR TV Station 



Owned and operated by THE OKLAHOMA PUBLISHING COMPANY: The Daily Oklahoman, Oklahoma City Times, 
The Farmer-Stockman, WKY, WSFA, & WSFA-TV. Represented by THE KATZ AGENCY 



50 



SPONSOR 




j^mw/f/yfo 



Continued 

from 

page 10 



thirty which was before he'd even got to the lab where another 
army of experts and their relatives took over. 

As if difficulties such as these aren't enough, we've super- 
imposed some other lovelies on the business of doing tele- 
vision. All of 'em make sense, mind you. But a shudder 
or two is in order as I recount them, I think you'll agree. 

I'm referring specifically now to the problems caused by 
the fact that most tv shows start around September. New 
shows, that is. Or new series of old shows. The buying of 
these epics, time as well as talent, is usually consummated 
about four months prior to this time, maybe five — more for 
film — less for live. 

By that time of year, that is April or May, you can usually 
tell if you've been living with a turkey during the current 
season which may be why T. S. Eliot wrote "April is the 
crudest month." You've also a fair idea then of what time 
slots are available, if any. You've had a good chance to 
screen the new films and kines and to listen to the buoyant 
conversation of the pilot pushers. So you make your decisions 
during the Springtime, decisions which you quite often have 
to live with for fifty weeks from the upcoming fall. 

This isn't ever easy. But it's four times as difficult as 
normal for those advertisers whose own fiscal years or crop 
years or budget or whatever they are called do not dovetail 
with the tv-year. In such cases the agency and ad depart- 
ments of these concerns are faced with the problem of making 
tv plans (which, of course, spring fully-clad from overall 
ad budgets) during a time of year when conjecture and 
prayer are methods of determining what course to take. 

Some of these companies have their fiscal year based on 
the harvest of a particular crop, sound reason indeed in terms 
of their basic manufacturing. Others are the result of a par- 
ticular selling season. Still others of a labor situation. Some 
are determined by the temperature. Even the commonplace 
calendar year is out-of-whack for tv. Each reason, however, 
is in its own way vital to the concern and completely sensible 
to the operation but a problem when it comes to making tv 
plans. And not much can be done about this for it would be 
churlish indeed to suggest that basic policies be altered to 
accommodate the vagaries of a single advertising medium. 

That wasn't the point of this tract though, if it had a point. 
I am merely seeking to demonstrate that Mr. Kaltenborn and 
lady announcers are not alone in their television difficulties. 
The folks in the agencies, though pictured in novels and on 
the screen as leading lives only a smidgeon less rewarding 
than that of the Prince of Monaco, do have to walk through 
a vale of tears on their way to the bank with the loot. Remem- 
ber that and speak softly in their presence. 



More 

People 

start the DAY with 





Whether in the home, on the 
farm, or on the move, KTSA 
programs are specially pre- 
pared for special people — our 
listeners! 



• • • 




CHARLES LUTZ 

Gen. Mgr. Station KTSA 
San Antonio, Texas 

CA 7-1251 Collect 

'Contact PAUL H.RAYMER CO. 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



51 



(DISTRICT 
ITORNEY 



starring DAVID BRIAN I 



Champion of the people! Here's proof! 

56.6 

CHARLOTTE 

beots What's My Line, 
Studio One, Ford The- 
atre, Godfrey and Friends 
and others. 



37.6 

OKLAHOMA 
CITY 


25.6 

BALTIMORE 


31.5 

BOSTON 


RENEWED BY 
CARTER'S IN 
37 MARKETS! 



ARB — October, November, 
December '55 






An Award-Winning Performance by 
Academy Award Winning Star! 



JOHNSTOWN 

beats I Love Lucy, Disney- 
land, Kraft TV Theatre, 
Life of Riley and others. 



51.9 

BAKERSFIELD 


40.2 

PEORIA 


41.3 


SELLING FOR 
BALLANTINES 


ROANOKE 


23 MARKETS! 




JiL'Aik.jA' 



ARB— November, '55 



akb — iNovemDer, do . V / j .J «./ 

M\dkii^dkA^iSjMtHAiAi'MHMMikh s i 



NOTHING TURNS ON THE HEAT LIKE ZIV i 



tow 3rd Year in Production! 




*>D' 6th Year in Production! 



T. WAYNE 

I $64,000 Question, 
Slivon, Dragnet, Dis- 
fl d and others. 



„ , ARB— Nov., Dec, '55 

CINCINNATI TELEPULSE— Nov., '55 



BARRY SULLIVAN 



We're 



Not Being 



KITTENISH 




But — 

It's Purr-ty Nice 

To Be WELCOME •« 

90,000 HOMES 

This Winter ! ! ! 
NBC Affiliate 

WJHP-TV 



ABC 



Jacksonville, Fla. 




lasn't seen Venice since entering advertising, sits before tv flat of city. 



agency profile 



Charles V. Sfeoog 

V.p., Director of merchandising 
Hicks & Greist, New Yorlt 



"People come into advertising in strange ways," Hicks & Greist's 
Charlie Skoog told sponsor. "I used to play clarinet and sax on club 
dates. Then after the war, I wrote a clothing-collection drive ad. 
Only ad I ever got a byline on. From then on, I was an adman." 

Behind this spoof, lies a deep conviction that "the role of the 
agency is changing. To service a client well, the agency today must 
act as advertising, sales and marketing consultant." 

"One of the most client-wise admen I know often says 'The food 
business today is advertising, with stress on tv.' But when he says 
'advertising' he's got a different concept than Madison Avenue used 
to have. He's talking not only about media decisions and producing 
selling copy. He also means packaging, labeling, helping determine 
who the most likely buyers of his product are and aiming a con- 
certed effort at them." 

Media concepts, too, have undergone radical changes, he added. 
"Too many clients consider network radio old-fashioned. But the 
medium isn't old-fashioned. There are just old-fashioned ways of 
using it." He illustrated his ideas of getting "coverage and mer- 
chandisability" out of network radio with the agency's recent buy of 
Don McNeill on ABC for Sandran. "Radio is tops when you get a 
personality to sell for you and merchandise the hell out of him." 

Skoog remembers that he originally got out of the entertainment 
field "because of the lousy hours, and look what 1 picked instead." 
A voluble, blonde man in his thirties, he deceptively acts relaxed 
about business, lives and breathes advertising. 

"You're trapped," he says apologetically. "I'll play golf with a 
guy and he's talking to me about innocuous problems like his neigh- 
bor's ashcans. (It seems they're pretty desperate, low-down ash- 
cans.) So I figure I've got a deal. I'm away from Madison Avenue 
and I'm talking like other people do, about ashcans. But who do the 
ashcans belong to? You've got it: president of an agency. So by 
the time we hit the third hole, we're talking cost-per-1,000." 

Skoog's accounts divide into two classes: "In durable goods, the 
dealer's vital. Your advertising has to impress him. With package 
goods, the consumer's it. If you've got him. he'll put the pressure 
on the supermarkets to stock up." 



• • • 



54 



SPONSOR 



An instructive treatise on advt. -writing, 

wittily annotated. 




When you can't think of any- 
thing else, fall back on a success 
story. 




After the stage is set irresist- 
ibly, get in some fast body 
punches. 




Rhetorical questions are nice, 
especially if a guy can't fight 
back. 




Throw in a foreign phrase. This 
impresses copy chiefs and takes 
only an instant. 



Howdy Roberts winds a musical clock on your 
favorite radio station in Eastern Iowa. Part 
of his morning chore involves a quarter-hour 
arabesque for a drug chain. (Ed.: Why not 
name it? Ted: Okay. Ford Hopkins.) Dur- 
ing seven fateful days recently . . . 



. . . Howdy mumbled some off-hand noth- 
ings about a coffee special for three days run- 
ning (one to a customer to make it harder — 
handicaps like this don't faze our Mister 
Roberts). Coffee sales perked, dripped, and 
boiled over at 634. (Par was 633.) 

Next three days Howdy got around to nap- 
kins. Paper napkins. Ford Hopkins sold all 
they had — 526 packages. Why don't people 
learn they gotta back up radio commercials 
with mdse. 1 Anyway, radio commercials on 
this station have to be backed up with mdse. 
period. 



But the real coup de maitre (F.) came on the 
seventh day. F. H. sold 300 dishclouts by 
1 :30 p.m. after Howdy let go with 60 seconds 
worth of clean diction in the a.m. Voila ! 




Bury the sig. if you must but 
don't forget the reps. (Nothing 
strains relations with clients 
more.) 



It seems hardly necessary to state that all this 
mdse. -moving took place on WMT, the CBS 
station for Eastern Iowa, mail address Cedar 
Rapids, 600 kc (good!), national sales rep- 
resentatives, The Katz Agency. 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



55 



HOMES 



H'(iNs(i|{ : ( ,,11,.;,,. Heights 



AGENCY: Direct 



. VPSl IK CASE HISTORY: To test the effect of radio 
advertising the sponsor bought a trial package of 20 an- 
nouncements for $55. The schedule was aired over a 
week-end, ten each on Saturday and Sunday with the 
result that 400 people went through the open house. Four 
tales neve made that were directly attributable to the 
radio campaign. The homes ranged in price from $12.- 
500 to $19,000. and the success of the campaign convinced 
the sponsor thai it ought to begin regular advertising 
on the station. 



KBIS, Bakersfield, Cal. 



PROGR \M: Announcements 




• 



results 



• 



LADIES' COATS 



SPONSOR: Ridgeway Stores AGENCY: Lewis, Hunter & Hatt 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Though the sponsor is a 
regular participant on the Steve Allison Show, it ran a 
test of the shoivs pulling power. A three-announcement 
schedule was planned to advertise 20 women's Cashmere 
coats, reduced to $55. Despite the unseasonably warm 
weather at the time and the odd hour for such announce- 
ments I'll p.m. to 2 a.m.), the entire stock was sold out 
before the third announcement could be aired. Cost of 
ilie two announcements'. $36; price of the coats: $1,100. 



WPEN, Philadelphia 



PROGRAM: Steve Allison Show, 
Announcement- 



ROSE BUSHES 



SPONSOR: Gordon's Super-Yalu 



AGENCY: Direct 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: On Friday the sponsor 
placed an order for 20 announcements, some 15-second 
flash and the rest 30-seconds. No other advertising was 
used, but by 3 p.m. Saturday the sponsor asked to can- 
cel the six remaining announcements. Nearly 1,000 of 
the advertised 59<* rose bushes were sold for close to $600 
and shoppers bought large amounts of otfier items ivhile 
they were in the store. Store manager Jack Gordon an- 
nounced that he was "Very pleased" with the results of 
the $25 ad schedule. 



< KOV, Kelowna, B. C. 



PROGRAM: Announcements 



ANTIFREEZE 



SPONSOR: Simpson-Sear- AGENCY: Direc 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Taking advantage of th, 
immediacy of radio advertising, Simpson-Sears placed i 
$10 flash announcement campaign on CHUB on the morn 
ing of the seasons first cold snap. The 15-second an 
nouncements started in the morning and by the end of tlu 
day the sponsor had sold 800 quarts of anti-freeze at 89s 
each. The radio announcements brought in a total o 
$712 for an advertising outlay of $10. The station i 
convinced that this ratio will bring them more seasona 
business from the sponsor. 



CHUB, Nanaimo, B.C. 



PROGRAM: Announcement 



VACATION BOOKLET 



SP( >NSOR: N. J. Dept. of Conservation AGENCY: Robert Conaha; 
and Economic Development 

CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: When the N. J. Departmen 
of Conservation and Economic Development offered it 
free vacation booklet, "Vacation Variety," it used vari 
ous media. The campaign included 25 newspapers, fin 
magazines and two radio stations. WNEW pulled 7,29f 
requests or 31.6% of the total answers for only 10% o\ 
the ad cost. A 19-announ-cement per week schedule wot 
run for three weeks at a total cost of $37.50. The Neu 
York independent was almost four times as effective 
all other media used. 



WNEW. New York 



PROGRAM: Announcement 



' 



LIVESTOCK FEED 



SPONSOR: Tennessee Farmer's Co-Op 



AGENCY: Direc 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: Five million pounds of live 
stock feed were sold within a two-week period because o I 
a promotion on WSM's Farm Market Report. The 15 j 
minute show plugged an offer of a pair of nylons for 69' 
and the tags from five 100-pound sacks of feed. Horac 
Corder, a marketing expert with the Tennessee Depart 
ment of Agriculture, conducts the 11:30 to 11:45 a.n, 
strip and gives daily information on livestock, fruit an. 
vegetable market prices. Cost of the shoiv. $90 daily. 



WSM. Whville 



PROGRAM: Farm Market Repo, 



COOKIES 



SPONSOR: B & B Biscuit Co. 



AGENCY: Brad-Wright-Smit 



CAPSULE CASE HISTORY: The client regularly spot 
sors two five-minute Beat The Weatherman shows daib 
one at 8:20 a.m. and the other at 3:00 p.m. A disk jocke 
telephones listeners at home to have them guess the exai 
temperature at the moment of the call. To test the show. 
the client offered a premium in cookies for every labi 
sent in by a deadline. Though 239 labels arrived in tinu 
a flood of later labels followed, all of which received th 
premium. This caused the sponsor to recommend an ii 
creased ad budget to the manufacturer. Weekly cost: $19; 



WDOK, Cleveland 



PROGRAM: Beat The Weatherma 

i 




P. A. STAPLES 



rc Hershey Employees 

cited for 

Payroll Savings Plan..." 



wholeheartedly recommend that all business executives 
activate this plan in their respective companies." 

R A. STAPLES, Chairman of Board and President, 
Hershey Chocolate Corporation 



"We, the officials and employees of the Hershey Choco- 
late Corporation of Hershey, Pennsylvania, are proud 
of the citation recently presented to us for outstanding 
participation in the United States Treasury's Payroll 
Savings Plan for the purchase of Savings Bonds. 

"We all realize fully the importance of sound money 
to the economy of our country and our community. I 



If your company has the Payroll Savings Plan, your 
State Sales Director will be glad to help you organize 
a Person-to-Person Canvass that should increase em- 
ployee participation to 50%, 60% or more. If you do not 
have the Plan, he will show you how easy it is to install 
one. Write to Savings Bond Division, U. S. Treasury 
Department, Washington, D. C. 



The United States Government does not pay for this advertising. The Treasury Department 
thanks, for their patriotic donation, the Advertising Council and 

SPONSOR PUBLICATIONS, INC. 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



57 



the 
big 
look 




is 
to 



kbis 



bakersfield 
California 



970 



DOMINATING CALIFORNIA'S 
SOUTHERN SAN (OAQUIN VALLEY 
WITH POPULAR MUSIC AND NEWS 
24 HOURS A DAY! 



representative 

NEW YORK 
CHICACO 
ST. LOUIS 
LOS ANCELES 



ADAM YOUNG. |R 




Continued 

from 

page 17 



who bills himself simply "Binny," does minor miracles with 
library and other recorded music to supply backgrounds, 
which antiquate the old organ under soapers. Space doesn't 
permit running down through the entire crew, but believe me, 
the large degree of competence and efficiency I'm describing 
applies to the floor and control room personnel from top to 
bottom. And Stark and Layton keep the whole thing pulled 
together with an eagle eye and a deft hand. 

I didn't pry into the budget on "Romances," but I'd be 
willing to make a small wager that it's brought in at a stagger- 
ingly low figure, and that Colgate's cost-per-thousand is en- 
chantingly low. 

On a local level, and in the kid show field, another quiet 
little packaging operation does a fine job for sponsors. This 
is Jules Power Productions. Jules is a Chicago lad, who with 
his right hand man, Danny Wilson, produces the following 
moppet stanzas: Time for Fun via WABC-TV, New York, 
five a week; Lunch Time Little Theatre via WGN-TV, Chi- 
cago, five a week; Time for Fun via WEWS-TV, Cleveland, 
five a week; Flippy, the Clown via WGTV-TV, Hartford, 
five a week; and Tip Top Circus via WNDU-TV, South 
Bend, five a week. This totals up to twenty-five shows a week, 
all of top kiddie caliber, and all doing sound sales jobs for 
their sponsors. In my opinion Power and his crew will come 
up one day with a network show which will make its mark. 
And here again, the answer seems to be a matter of carefully 
chosen and trained personnel on every level. 

Even on the radio side, where show budgets these days can 
hardly be seen without the assistance of a high-powered 
microscope, some packagers are working (within small bud- 
get limitations) and delivering profit-producing shows for 
buyers. Gordon Auchincloss is a prime example, here. Gor- 
don produces the Martha Wright Show five days a week, and 
the new Jim Lowe Show, five weekly, both via WCBS. Gor- 
don also packages a number of other shows in both radio and 
tv, but these two are enough to illustrate the point. Both 
shows are breezy "musicals," utilizing records, yet cannot be 
called disk jockey shows, nearly as well as they may be 
called "personality shows." The carefully written scripts, the 
fast-paced direction make them real standouts on today's ra- 
dio scene. And I speak from the position that both the shows 
are sold out and their sponsors are happy with the results. 

Certainly the major networks are producing, and do con- 
trol, the $500,000 budgeted spectaculars, and many another 
major show these days. But it's my considered guess that 
there will never come a time, in either radio or tv, when there 
won't be a place for the alert, hardworking packager, who 
skips the nonsense and works efficiently toward putting to- 
gether programs at low cost to bring big results. 

For more on program control see New York Special Report, page 28 



58 



SPONSOR 




< 



According to three nationally recognized television audience surveys, KLZ-TV is first in overall 
ratings and share of audience: American Research Bureau — November 6-12, 1955; Telepulse— 
November 1-7, 1955; American Research Bureau Telephone Coincidental— December 5-9, 1955. 



MOST COLORADO VIEWERS WATCH KLZ-TV 

AFTERNOONS 

N«<5tfT« 

ALL WEEK LONG- !! 

Equally important— more local and national advertisers spend more advertising dollars— for more 
KLZ-TV time— and get more results per dollar — than on any other Denver TV station. 

BUY, RESULTS... BUY KLZ-TV IN DENVER! 




Your Katz man and I are anxious 

to tell you of the many exceptional sales 

results enjoyed by national and 

local advertisers presently using KLZ-TV... 

We believe we can assist you — too. 

Call one of us for these success stories 

and details of the above surveys. 

JACK TIPTON 
General Sales Manager 



Represented nationally by The Katz Agency 



KLZ 



Channel 



CBS-TV IN DENVER 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



59 



At the right are 10 key points 

which will help you evaluate SPONSOR 

in your 1956 trade paper plans 






The 




I 






SPONSOR ADVERTISING FACT SHEET 



EDITORIALLY, SPONSOR IS TOTALLY BEAMED TOWARD NATIONAL 
ERTISERS AND AGENCIES. OUR MISSION IS TO GIVE "THE MEN 
FOOT THE BILLS" GUIDANCE IN THE EVALUATION AND PURCHASE 
i TV AND RADIO TIME AND PROGRAMS. 

SPONSOR'S CIRCULATION IS THE PUREST FOR YOUR PURPOSES IN THE 
r RADIO TRADE PAPER FIELD. OF 10,000 CIRCULATION, ABOUT 
J 00 GO TO NATIONAL AND REGIONAL AGENCIES AND ADVERTISERS; 
}50 TO ADVERTISERS, 3,300 TO AGENCIES. THAT'S 7 OUT OF 10 
-. REMARKABLY PINPOINTED CIRCULATION. 



SPONSOR IS THE USE MAGAZINE OF THE INDUSTRY. TV BASICS, RADIO 
g ICS, TV RESULTS, RADIO RESULTS, FILM BASICS, TV DICTIONARY, 
TtEBUYING BASICS, TV AND RADIO STATION BUYERS' GUIDE, TIME- 
3 ERS OF THE U. S., AND MANY, MANY MORE PROJECTS ARE EXAMPLES 
I SPONSOR USE VALUE. SPONSOR AVERAGES 250 INFORMATION REQUESTS 
MNTHLY FROM ADVERTISERS AND AGENCIES. 

ALL IMPARTIAL AGENCY-AND-ADVERTISER-TRADE-PAPER-READERSHIP-STUDIES 
\ DE DURING THE PAST TWO YEARS PROVE SPONSOR'S DECIDED 
. DERSHIP IN ITS FIELD (DETAILS ON REQUEST). 



SPONSOR AVERAGES NEARLY 20 PAID SUBSCRIPTIONS (AT ITS QUALITY PRICE 
$8 PER YEAR) AT THE 33 TOP TIMEBUYING AGENCIES. AT JWT, 
B»0, Y&R, AND M-E SPONSOR HAS FROM 40 TO 60 PAID SUBSCRIPTIONS. 
a:NCY LIBRARIANS REPORTED, IN A TRADE PAPER STUDY, THAT SPONSOR 
[KEPT ONE YEAR OR LONGER AS A REFERENCE SOURCE, THE AVERAGE 
P PLICATION SIX MONTHS OR LESS. 





( RECENTLY, SRDS COMPLETED A STUDY OF ADVERTISING GAINS OR LOSSES 

A ONG THE TRADE PUBLICATIONS OF OUR FIELD. OF THOSE LISTED ONLY 

1 O SHOWED GAINS — SPONSOR AND SRDS. SPONSOR'S GAIN WAS OVER 250 PAGES. 



the magazine 
tv and radio 
advertisers USE 



l ALTHOUGH TRADE PAPERS ARE FREQUENTLY REGARDED AS INTANGIBLES, 
S)NSOR IS ABLE TO SHOW SPECIFIC RESULTS I FOLDER 
C EXAMPLES ON REQUEST). 

( 

( SPONSOR IS A PRESTIGE PUBLICATION. YOUR PRESTIGE MESSAGE GETS 

1 E ADVANTAGE OF SPONSOR'S EXCELLENT STANDING IN ITS FIELD. 

■ 

SPONSOR FIGHTS FOR WORTHWHILE INDUSTRY IMPROVEMENTS, PROJECTS, 
^D REFORMS. IT IS REGARDED AS THE FOREMOST ADVERTISING MAGAZINE 
I THIS RESPECT. THIS HELPS PRODUCE A HEALTHY, ACTIVE 
(IMATE FOR YOUR MESSAGE. 



J. 



I, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVES LIKE SPONSOR. THEY KNOW HOW 
1 OROUGHLY IT'S READ AND USED. ASK YOURS WHAT HE THINKS OF SPONSOR. 
K'LL BE GLAD TO TELL YOU. HE KNOWS SPONSOR. 



THE INFORMATIVE BROCHURE 

"HOW MUCH SHOULD A STATION INVEST 

IN TRADE PAPER ADVERTISING" 

IS YOURS FOR THE ASKING. 



;:>;::';-:^>:'£'>:>:; : :-: : x : : : : : : : / 





Color tv, lire and on film, being given big push in 1056 



Other colorcasts currently being offered 
by Interstate are 114 quarter hour 
shows composed of Adventure Album 
and Popular Science Newsreels. 

To make color tv programing readily 
accessible to stations that have not 
vet had color transmitting equipment 
installed. RCA is offering a mobile 
color studio to stations within a 150 
mile radius of Philadelphia. Other 
mobile units will be added to the 
service in the future. 

According to A. R. Hopkins, Man- 
ager of the RCA Broadcast Products 
Department, stations modified for color 
transmission will be able to use the 
unit's completely equipped video and 
audio facilities as well as two live 
studio cameras. In addition, RCA will 
provide the services of two engineers 
to instruct and supervise station per- 
sonnel in the setting up and technical 
operation of the equipment. 

The Mummer's Parade, broadcast 
by WCAU-TV, Philadelphia, was one 
of the first color shows transmitted by 
the unit. * * * 



Safari so good for deejag 
Eddie Chase of CKLW 



RCA's new mobile unit on location 

For those who've seen color tv, it's 
arrived. For thousands who haven t, 
it's on its way and scheduled for ac- 
ceptance in '56. Working on the 
theory that once the public has seen 
color tv they'll want it, color sets are 
being seeded in key locations to create 
consumer interest. Wells Television, 
Inc. has been a leader in this process 
with the installation of color tv in at 
least 150 hotel rooms in New York 
City. A comparable number of sets 
have been installed in approximately 
eight cities outside New York. Wells 
executives find that once people come 
face to face with color tv they re de- 
lighted with it and the experience leads 
to sales. 

Color film will also give color pro- 
graming a boost this year as syndi- 
cators offer series and individual color 
features for the steadily expanding 
color market. WNBQ-TV. Chicago, 
and KING-TV, Seattle have been the 
first to sign contracts for Screencraft 
Pictures' new full color Judge Roy 
Bean series. Both stations launched 
the show early in January. To back 
up its own interest in color tv, RCA is 
sponsoring the program over WNBQ 
with a series of full color commercials. 
Quintet Productions is producing the 
show in Hollywood. 

Interstate Television Corp., a sub- 
sidiary of Allied Artists, has 26 high 
budget color films ready for distribu- 
tion this year. The ITC selection was 
originally produced by the parent 
company between 1948 and 1952. 




Detroit's Eddie Chase tries a jungle beat 

If vou're tiring of rockin' and rollin' 
and the chatter of local disk jockeys 
is forcing you to buy your own 
records, off with you to Detroit where 
d. j. Eddie Chase has broken the 



pattern with a jungle beat. Following 
the well worn but still exciting paths 
of Hollywood's major studios and per- 
sonalities like Ernest Hemingway, 
Chase took an 18.000 mile safari of 
his own for the purpose of offering his 
CKLW listeners something exotic in 
the way of disk jockey fare. 

Chase was feted by Africans who are 
celebrities in their own right by virtue 
of filmdom's celluloid recordings. The 
king of the Watusi, known to millions 
for his appearance with his tribe in 
"King Solomon's Mines," and the 
Masai warriors were among Chase's 
hosts. Also included in the trip was a 
stop at Dr. Albert Schweitzer's famous 
hospital camp. 

Among the interesting customs 
Chase discovered was the use of drums 
rather than call letters to identify 
African stations. 

Thomas J. Doyle, Inc., sponsor of 
Chase's 6:15 to 7 p.m. Monday through 
Friday program, never thought they'd 
be sponsoring a show from Africa, but 
then, they're never quite sure what 
Chase will give them next even while 
he's safe at home in the CKLW studios. 

• • • 



Spanish language telecast 
taps fresh KJVT1 marhet 




Sailing beer with a Spanish accent on KNTV 

Burgermeister Beer and Royal 
Crown Cola are selling a hitherto un- 
explored audience via a Spanish lan- 
guage telecast on KNTV, San Jose, 
Cal. Through Mallory Advertising 
Agency, the companies have success- 
fully sponsored Fiesta since September. 



62 



SPONSOR 



1955. each spending $135 weekly for 
the half-hour musical. 

As Jim Bentley. Radio-Tv Director 
of Mallory says, "It was decided that 
live commercials and a general musical 
show would be a most effective 
vehicle." 

MC Jose Alvarez was selected be- 
cause he's a local personality with a 
"buying" knowledge of his people. A 
Latin quintet, a professional talent list 
of Spanish acts gathered for use on a 
rotation basis and an "amateur talent" 
contest segment were developed for a 
generalized approach. 

But above all, simplicity of appeal 
has been the keynote of program and 
delivery of each sponsors two one- 
minute commercials. 

With point-of-purchase cards, news- 
paper ads, spot radio adjacent to 
Spanish language radio shows, all 
promoting Fiesta, both clients feel 
show reaches over 40^ of the buying 
potential in the area. * * * 

Briefly . . . 

"For outstanding achievement in 
radio and television merchandising", 
during the 12 months between July 1, 
1955 and June 30. 1956. a Cadillac 
automobile and a placque will be 
awarded the Sylvania "Distributor of 
the Year." In announcing the award 
Bernard 0. Holsinger. Sylvania's Gen- 
eral Sales Manager, emphasized the 
necessity for "a broad comprehension 
of advertising and merchandising 
methods." The judges will be Arthur 
L. Chapman, Operations v. p.: Thomas 
P. Ryan, Sales Manager. Radio & Tv; 
John D. Thuet, Radio Sales Manager; 
C. R. Lunney, Advertising & Sales 
Promotion Manager and Elbert W. 
Merriam, Service Manager. 

* * * 

WIP, Philadelphia, oldest depart- 
ment store-owned station in the coun- 
try, celebrated 25 years on the air on 1 
February and honored the station's 
president and general manager, Bene- 
dict Gimbel. Jr. at a party for members 
of the board of directors and station 
personnel. A special plaque was given 
to Benedict Gimbel. 

* * *- 

American film producers working 
abroad have recently begun a practice 
of shooting special footage on location 
for use in tv spot commercials in the 
States. They are not "trailers" in the 
usual sense since they will also be used 
as theatrical short subjects. * * * 




PAL/^4 



"Timebuyers — check your new 
PULSE survey for Charleston, 
S. C. It's the same old story! 
EMMETT LAMPKIN'S In The 
Garden and In The Garden Ves- 
pers lead the field again! BOB 
NICHOLS' Blues '«' Boogie is 
right up there on top, too, as 
usual! 

This means audience — and audi- 
ence means sales! See our rep 
.... now!' 



,f" 



("I don't know why we keep 
spending the money for these 

things — we always win 

ho-hum. . . .",) 



w-PAL 

of Charleston 
South Carolina 



Represented by 
For joe & Company 




FOR 5,000 WATTS 



KNAK*, the mighty independent of the Utah trade area 
is now a better buy than ever! More power — more 
pull — more sales for you in an area that is larger than 
Pittsburgh, Milwaukee or Houston and only slightly 
smaller than Washington, D. C, Boston or San Francisco. 
Remember, in Salt Lake, BETTER BUY KNAK - IT'S A 
BETTER BUY THAN EVER! 

Represented Nationally by Forjoe & Co., inc. 

KNAK 

1042 South 6th West, Salt Lake City, Utah 



HOOPERATING 

KNAK 27.8 

Station "A" 27.2 

Station "B" 14.6 

Station "C" 13.7 

Station "D" 7.2 

*Hooper Rating — February, 
1955 (12:00 noon to 6:00 

p.m. average.) 

SALT 
of LAKE 
CITY 



fi FEBRUARY 19Sfi 



63 



are in 






your host, Allyn Edwards 




Big advertisers, small advertisers . . . not J 
Every weekday ABC-TV's exciting, new 
emoon Film Festival" (3-5 EST) giv( ] 
more big-name entertainment for your il 
than any other show on television. He. 
some of the stars you get at the new, lovxl 
time rate: James Mason, Steirart Gr>d 
Jean Simmons, David Niven, Robert Mm 
Deborah Kerr, Mai Zetterling, Alec Guim 
Michael Redgrave, Paul Lukas. Here art on 
of the modern, top motion pictures : E 
Journey, Always a Bride, The Cr< 
Hungry Hill, The Adventurers, The 1 ni 
tance. When you get all the facts — hw 
plan, rating potential, frequency discouiM 
you'll agree this is TV's most exciting pi tid 
pation buy. 



abc television network 



7 West 66th St., New York 23, N. Y., SUsquehanna M 
20 North Wacker Drive. Chicago, Illinois, AXdoverffl 
277 Golden Gate, San Francisco. UNderhill 3-0077 



HOLLYWOOD TV 

{Continued from page 27) 

last extreme. They want a bonus and 
their bonus thinking is a promotion 
plug, usually one they have had hang- 
ing around for some time. 

• Does not tend to create serious 
competition to current theatrical mo- 
tion picture exhibition. 

• Is backed by enough money. And 
by this they mean just that. They do 
not want bargaining on an "Arab 
trader" level. If the advertiser and/or 
network is talking real, honest-to-good- 
ness top money, they're ready to listen. 
But they are not ready to give atten- 
tion to someone dickering for a sale 
price who will then go out to see if 
money can be raised. 

• Permits the studio to retain rights 
and control the features for times and 
purposes other than their use on the 



program, for which the deal was made. 

sponsor asked one executive v. p. of 
a top studio for a specific suggestion 
on such a deal. He started and stopped 
three times before finally coming up 
with something that was not prefaced 
with "Now don't print this, but . . ." 
Resting his arm on a bookshelf con- 
taining an "Oscar," he had this to say: 

"What I am going to suggest is a 
prototype rather than a specific offer 
from our studio. However, I think any 
studio would do well to entertain such 
an offer as the one that I'm going to 
outline. Let's say a network or a 
group of advertisers underwrite a par- 
ticular tv-movie program. You know 
the type. So-and-So-Living Room The- 
ater. And they'd be willing to use the 
name of the studio in the title such as 
MGM's, RKO's or Paramount's So-and- 
So Living Room Theater. Conceivably, 
this program might be presented be- 



tween noon and 6 or 7 p.m., possibly 
opposite NBC's Matinee when most of 
the women in the nation are available, 
or exposed to their tv sets, but when 
nobody would normally be going to 
the movies." 

And here is what another executi\c 
at a different studio had to say on the 
"specific suggestion" level: 

"Let a sponsor or a network select 
a small group of, say, special features, 
all falling into a specific category or 
all starring a specific actor or actress 
( Humphrey Bogart, Esther Williams, 
Gary Cooper, Jimmy Cagney) and use 
them, let's say, once a month, as a 
series of 'specials' or 'spectaculars' or 
whatever you fellows like to call them. 
This we'd be interested in. Of course, 
there'd be other items to consider like 
a promotion gimmick, but we could 
clear that hurdle." 

The important fact which both men 




I. Ycir stutions on air 



:iTY & STATE 



CALL 
LETTERS 



CHANNE. 
NO 



ON-AIR 
OATF 



ERP <kw)* 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)*" 



NET 
AFFILIATION 



cTue SETS I N 

ON AIR MARKET! 

ON AIK (000) 



PERMITEE. MANAGER. RE- 



KSPRING, TEX. 
E/ER, COLO. 



KBST-TV 
KRMA-TV 



^ES CENTER, NEB. KHPL-TV 
A^NNAH, GA. WSAV-TV 



10 Jan. 
30 Jan. 



22 Jan. 
21 Jan. 



5.13 



28.4 
32.4 



323 



707 
370 



CBS 
None 



None 
None 



None 

KOA-TV 

KBTV 

KFEL-TV 

KLZ-TV 

None 

WTOC-TV 



NFA 

NFA 



NFA 
150 



Wm. J. Wallace, pres. 
Howard Barrett, v. p. 



Bi States Co.. F. Wayne Brewster, pres. 
C. E. Freas, Jr., v. p. 
WSAV Inc. 



ff. Mew construction permits* 



OITY & STATE 



CALL 
LETTERS 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



DATE OF GRANT 



ERP <kw)* 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)"' 



STATIONS 
ON AIR 



SETS IN 
MARKET* 

(000) 



PERMITEE. MANAGER. RADIO RIP1 



RNO, CAL. 
(MXVILLE, TENN. 
^IMI, FLA. 



10 1 Oct. 56 235 1943 

10 11 Jan. 316 925 

7 18 Jan. 316 966 



KJEO 

KMJ-TV 

WATE 

WTSK-TV 

WGBS-TV 

WTHS-TV 

WTVJ 

WITV 



]_9 Calif. Inland Bidcstng. Co. 

200 Radio Sta. WBIR Inc. 

293 Biscayne Tel. Inc. 



Iff. Mew applications 



CITY t STATE 



CHANNEL 
NO. 



DATE 
FILED 



ERP (kw)* 
Visual 



Antenna 
(ft)"* 



ESTIMATED 
COS! 



ESTIMATED 

1ST YEAR 

OP. EXPENSE 



TV STATIONS 
IN MARKET 



APPLICANT. AM AFFILIATE 



FLIRA, N. Y. 
'SEVILLE, ORE. 



11 
11 



14 Jan. 
21 Jan. 



220 

.467 



808 
2,520 



$247,749 
$14,691 



$325,000 
$2,000 



None 
None 



Veterans Brdcstng Co. Inc. 
Gri2zly Tel. Inc. 



BOX SCORE 



U. S. stations or air 42 7 § 



Markets covered 



>(il$ 



8 new c.p.'i and nations going on the air Hated here are those which occurred between 
# member and 9 December or on which information could be obtained in that period. Stations 
swonsidered to be on the air when commercial operation starts. **Effect1ve radiate-) power 
Aul power usually is one-half the visual power. ***Antenna height above average terrain (uoi 
«■>' ground) t Inform at Inn on the number nf seta in markets where not deilirnatpd as he!*"" 



from NBC Research, consists of estimates from the stations or reps and must be ueeuieU auprtn- 
mate. SData from V?.r Ttp= , <*a''*h and Plamiing NFA* Nn figures available at presuMi'- 
on sets in market. ^-Community would support proposed lower-power station at least three years, 
or until such time as it becomes self-sustaining. 2PresentIy off air, but still retains C.P. 
3 Xon commercial. 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



65 



Wise Owl: 
sells drug 
products 
in L. A. on 

KMPC 



• Owl Drug Company's recent re- 
newal of their 60-programs-weekly 
schedule on 50,000-watt KMPC is 
based on their 4-year experience on 
the station. Tlie agency with drug 
product accounts may well follow the 
lead of this successful retailer, who 
checks sales results at cash registers 
every day of the week. 

• As with drug store items, so with 
other products and services. KMPC, 
with its Music-News-Sports program 
pattern, has success stories by the 
handful in every important category. 
Ratings? Consistently good. Your 
favorite measurement service will 
show KMPC in a favored place in Los 
Angeles. That's why we say: 

. . . // You Want To SELL 

Southern California . . . BUY 

KMPC 

710 kc LOS ANGELES 

50,000 watts days 10,000 watts nights 

Gene Autry, President 

Robert O. Reynolds, v. p. and gen. mgr. 

Represented Nationally by AM Radio Sales 



stressed in their suggestions was that 
such use would not present a serious 
threat to theater exhibition, while at 
the same time it would give the orig- 
inating studio a chance to be men- 
tioned. 

"Let me add," said a third, whose 
suggestion was along the lines of those 
outlined above, "that a free one-min- 
ute plug for our current theatrical 
product, somewhere during the pro- 
gram, would certainlv be an important 
added consideration." 

In order to help admen in their 
plans, related to the motion picture 
industry, sponsor presents the an- 
swers to another group of questions 
asked of responsible men at the vari- 
ous studios: 

► Are you willing to consider an out- 
right sale of your feature picture back- 
log, if enough money is offered? 

SPONSOR got three unoualified 
"No's." The only "Yes" came from an 
important independent, who quickly 
added that he did not believe that 
within the foreseeable future anvone 
was likely to offer whet he would con- 
sider "enough money." 

The remainder of those interviewed, 
reverted to suggestions along the lines 
of those above. 

► Are you willing to entertain an of- 
fer, to present a major motion picture 
for its first run on tv? 

sponsor gives the answer of a man 
whose studio, aside from the multi- 
million dollar big pictures, still pro- 
duces a limited number of pictures at 
a cost of a million or slightly less: 

"There is no blanket answer to this 
question." he said. "But let us take a 
hypothetical case: We're producing a 
color feature, that will cost around one 
million when completed. A network 
approaches us with the proposition to 
run this picture on tv prior to its the- 
atrical release. We might be willing to 
let this picture go to tv, if the tv run 
will bring us back our negative cost 
(which is likely to be somewhat less 
than the $1 million budget), because 
with the enormous savings in adver- 
tising and release print costs, we stand 
a good chance to make a bigger profit 
out of the subsequent theatrical runs 
in the domestic and foreign markets 
than if the picture were to be handled 
in the conventional manner. It must 
be remembered that an ever-increas- 
ing percentage of our profits at the 



current box-office set-up stem from 
foreign distribution. 

"I would be especially tempted to 
make such a deal, if it were to concern 
the type of picture which stands to 
gain by word-of-mouth reputation. In 
other words, a picture that has no sen- 
sational gimmick on which to hang an 
advertising campaign, but that has the 
kind of emotional story values that 
will make people talk about it. In our 
way of thinking, the tv run in such a 
case would take the place of a road- 



show engagement. 



66 



► What about pictures like "The Ten 
Commandments," "Guys and Dolls" 
and such? 

The head of one of the top studios, 
after admitting that the above formula 
might work for certain pictures, gave 
this answer: 

"These are not pictures in the old 
sense of the word. These are shows. 
Like a Broadway play they need spe- 
cial exploitation and special handling 
in their presentation. People will al- 
ways be willing to leave their homes 
and spend money to see such shows. 
In the long run it will be the unique 
heritage of the motion picture produc- 
er, to create a limited number of such 
shows each year and tv will never, or 
not at least in the foreseeable future, 
have the kind of resources, to utilize 
such shows profitably." 

► Are you willing to create pictures 
especially for tv? 

Five of the studios generally had this 
to say: "The answer depends on the 
circumstances. Under no condition 
will we make such pictures on specula- 
tion. Our speculative funds will al- 
ways be funneled into our theatrical 
product. On the other hand, we are 
most certainly willing to entertain of- 
fers from either networks or sponsors, 
to produce special programs for them 
be they 30-, 60-, 90-minute or other 
lengths, as long as the offer involves 
monies and conditions which give us a 
reasonable chance to make a profit. 
This profit may be derived from the 
actual production or from the subse- 
quent theatrical distribution of such 
shows in the domestic and/or foreign 
theater markets." 

► With the rapid integration of mo- 
tion pictures and tv, are you thinking 
about acquiring control of one of the 
existing networks, or of creating a 

SPONSOR 






WHAT'S AN ALLIGATOR 



DOING AT 



THE 21? 




from Gulf To Ocean • Gainesville To Okeechobee 



the 'Gator declared, "I'm doing a right good job. 
That's the reason I'm here. The listeners like me; the 
advertisers think I'm the greatest, so the boss says I've earned 
me a trip. 



"Besides, turn about is fair play. Every year more than 5 
million tourists come to Florida's WGTO Land and spend 
close to a billion dollars. The leasl I can do is buy you a drink. 




Now Something New is Added— "RECALLIT and WIN"— 



Cash Prizes — Every Weekday — On The Hour — $7000 jackpots! 

P.S. Here's a "natural" for national and regional advertisers who want to 
get the most out of their spot radio dollars. It's a 30-County W«GTO-Land 
Quiz, modeled after the high rated KWK (St. Louis) show that has been 
paying off for listeners — and sponsors — for years. 

SEND FOR FULL DETAILS TODAY 



W°OT(Q) 



10,000 WATTS 



Eugene D. Hill, Gen. Mgr. 
HAINES CITY, FLA. 
PHONE 6-2621 

owned and operated 

by KWK, St. Louis, Missouri 

Represented by 

WEED & COMPANY 

540 KILOCYCLES 



network of your own? 

"No. It would be foolish. First of 
all, based on the available resources it 
would be easier for NBC or CBS to ac- 
quire any one of the major motion 
picture studios, than the other way 
around. In addition, we were burned 
once, when the government forced us 
to liquidate our theatre interests and 
we certainly are not going to invite a 
similar action, by making such a move 
as you mentioned."' 

► What about fee tv? 



Most of the major executives get a 
nostalgic look in their eyes when this 
is mentioned. They admit having had 
high hopes for this phase of television 
as a new means of creating a tremen- 
dous box-office potential for their prod- 
uct. Some of them still see it as a pos- 
sibility. 

"But it's a dying issue," one of them 
commented. "The networks, under the 
leadership of General Sarnoff. are 
proving that there is practically noth- 
ing in the fields of entertainment and 
sports, than cannot be presented with- 




QMt* 



i * 



t\H* 






\0* 



SOU- 






sut*** 




WSJS-TV 

316.000 WATTS 




AFFILIATE FOR 

WINSTON-SALEM 

GREENSBORO 

HIGH POINT 



I 



CALL 
HEADLEY-REED 
REPRESENTATIVES 



in the framework of commercial tv. In 
order to get FCC approval for their 
plans, the fee tv boys will have to 
prove that they can give the public 
something, that is unavailable in any 
other way, and that's worth paying for. 
1 his is getting more and more compli- 
cated, as tv comes of age." 

Only Paramount is still all-out opti- 
mistic about fee tv: 

"We have developed the Interna- 
tional Telemeter System and we believe 
that not only will the public be willing 
to pay for the kind of entertainment, 
that we can present at a nominal 
charge, but we feel confident that it 
will become reality. Whether or not 
the FCC has actual jurisdiction of this 
phase of tv, is not as yet clear. It may 
take an act of Congress, but you can't 
hold back progress for the benefit of 
the advertising business." 

► Is there a tvay in which to judge the 
effect, which first-run tv exposure 
might have on the gross of a picture? 

"To date we have no way of know- 
ing. The presentation of the 'Constant 
Husband' as a first run by NBC, will 
not be a criterion, since a British 
feature of that type at best appeals only 
to a limited audience. The average 
U.S. gross of such a picture is in the 
neighborhood of $500,000, which is 
the figure NBC reportedly paid for its 
use on tv. 

"The only other picture, which was 
first exposed via tv was "Davy Croc- 
kett." This, too, cannot be considered 
a test case. On the one hand it is a 
children's picture, and kids are known 
to love to see the same show over and 
over again. In addition, it rode in on 
the wave of a phenomenal publicity 
campaign which reached its climax 
during the period of tv presentation, 
but which petered out before the fea- 
ture had a chance to prove itself in the 
theatres. The theatrical grosses on 
"Davy Crockett'" have been disappoint- 
ing, but I do not believe that I would 
consider this experience a deterrent in 
evaluating the first-run tv exposure of 
one of our own pictures." 

Another executive picked "Marty" 
as an example. "Here is a picture, 
the story of which was presented live 
on tv, not once but twice. The feature 
contains little that wasn't in the origi- 
nal tv presentation, which had been 
seen by millions. And still it is doing 
business. Here is the kind of a case 
[Please turn to page 78) 



68 



SPONSOR 




KOOL-TV «?-»-" '*- 



ARIZONA 



ATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE - GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



69 




WSAZ-TV 

has the 

audience sewed up 

in the Huntington- 

Charleston 

television market 

with 25 out of 27 

top night-time 

shows * 




. 



I 



• i 

it 

i 
1 1 



l i 



Perry Como wsaz-tv 

Big Story wsaz-tv 

Fireside Theatre WSAZ-TV 

Life of Reilly wsaz-tv 

Lassie Station B 

Lux Video Theatre wsaz-tv 

Colgate Comedy Hour wsaz-tv 

Bob Hope WSAZ-TV 

Saturday Night Jamboree wsaz-tv 

People Are Funny wsaz-tv 

Groucho Marx wsaz-tv 

Waterfront WSAZ-TV 

Big Town wsaz-tv 

Big Surprise WSAZ-TV 

Robert Montgomery WSAZ-TV 

16., Grand Old Opry WSAZ-TV 

17. Ford Theatre wsaz-tv 

Father Knows Best WSAZ-TV 
Dragnet wsaz-tv 
I Love Lucy Station B 
George Gobel WSAZ-TV 
Producer's Showcase wsaz-tv 
Truth or Consequences wsaz-tv 
Loretta Young wsaz-tv 
Wild Bill Hickok wsaz-tv 
People's Choice wsaz-tv 
This Is Your Life wsaz-tv 



1. 

2. 

3. 

4. 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
11. 
12. 
13. 
14. 
15. 



18. 
19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 
23. 
24. 
25. 
26. 
27. 



Huntington- 
Charleston. 
West Virginia 

CHANNEL 3 
Maximum Power 

NBC BASIC 
~) NETWORK 

- -* affiliated 
ABC 






• 



!! 

II 



and alt the top 
cumulative daytime 
ratings, too, according 
to ARB, Nov. 1955. 




TELEVISION 

also affiliated with Radio Stations WSAZ. 

Huntington A WGKV, Charleston 

Lawrence H. Rogers, Vice President and 

General Manager, WSAZ, Inc. 

Represented nationally by 

The Katz Agency. 



70 



SPONSOR 



1956 



TV COMPARAGRAPH OF NETWORK PR 



MONDAY 



\ 



Valiant Lady 


lott Paper JWT 


NY 


m.w.f L 




$12,000 


Lava 


tf Lit* 


inar 


Hi in,- Pr 


7NY 


m-r L 


• B-T 


J8500 



lllsburv Mills: 
flour, mixes 
IHy m-th L 
B Uhr $4000 




1 



TU ESDAY 



Network 
programing 
ftlsconilmii 1 !] 



Ding n "ii 

School 

10-10:30 

Pi (J: BBAT 

alt m 10:15-30 

66Ch L 

% hr $745 

Vi hr $1,600 



No network 

programing 

m f 



Ernie Kovacs 

Show 

NY I. 



1 



Home 

ra-f 11-12 

91NT LAV 

(Women's service 

program. For 

oartlc sponsors. 

tlit-re aro eight 

l-mtn comnier- 

rluls an hour 

arallable 

l-mlti partlc: 

time & tal $7000 

(see tu (or 

sponjor Hit) 






Garry Moor* 
Miles Labs 
Wad* Aav 

tu 10-10:15 
Kellogg' Burnett 

tu 10:15-30 

56 7 ON Y L 

'/« hr $3,148 

Arthur Godfrey 

Corn Products 

C. U Miller 

Minn. Mining 

10:45-11 

BBDO 

Exp 2/14 




WEDN ESDAY 



Network 
programing 
discontinued 



No network 

programing 
m-f 



florltrsy (cotifdi 

Kellogg Burnett 

11-11:15 



Plltekury Milts 
cn-th 11:11 .10 
Burnett 






Strrke It Rich 
Col fata 

m-r (n* »™ 



Tennessee Ernie 

Ford Show 
Procter &Oamhl* 

12-12:15 set 
Hy m-r r. 
Benton & Bowie* 
'/« hr $2,700 

Feather Ytur 
Nttt 

(quia. Bud 

Cbllyer) 

3olgat*-P*lmollv* 

iwrr m-r h 

alt d 11:30-45 
Eaty <A hr $2,700 



Valiant Lady 

Wesson Oil 

NY L 

Fitzgerald 



No network 

program lot 

m-r 



Love of 


Life 


Amer Homo Pr 


ml (sea 


moo) 


B B-T 




Search (or Toaa'w 


PAG: 


loyt 


m-r (sea 


moo) 


B-B-T 





Guiding Llfot 
I'&O: Ivory. dt»t 

m-r (sea moo) 
Com titan 






Nl network 
Programing 

m-r 



No network 

programing 

m-r 



Jack 
NY 



Paar Show 
m-f L 



No nrtwo-?. 

nrogramlnrr 

m-r 



Love Story 

P&G: prell. 

ivory snow 

m-r (see moo) 

OFS 



Nu network 
programing 



Robert Q Lawla 

auat 
72NT ti 

</, hr $3,150 



Art Llnkletter 
Kellogg- all P' 

52TTT L 

tii.th 2:30-45 

Burnett 



NBC's Matinee 

Theatre 

partlc sponsors 

HT L 

COLOR 



Afternoon 
Film Festival 

st 1/16 
panic 






Date With 

Life 

Borden Co 

NT m.w.f Tj 

Y&R, '/i hr $2600 

Modern 

Romances 

Colgate 

B. Houston 

Queen for A 

Day 
NY L 



Dlilecup 

P&G 

Miles Labs 



Afternoon 
Film Festival 

panic 






>*i||«hnry Mill. 

»:45-S 
2:45-3 *i hr 

Burnett $4000 



Big P. 'It 

m-r 

NT sii« rn.th L 



Bob Crosby 

C-M alt wka 

Carnation 

3:30-3:45 

Miles Labs 

Wade 

3:45-4 



Brighter Day 
P&G 

m-r (see mon) 

Y&R 

The Secret Stores 
Amer Home Pra 
NT m-f L 
B-B-T 

On Your Account 

(Win Elliott) 
P&G: tide, prell 

m-f 
Benton & Bowie* 



Pinky Le* Mickey Mouae 

Show club 

4SHy m-f L m .f 

1 mln partlc my f\ me Fooda 
time & total- K R 
partlc $2,800 We lch Grape Jc 

Howdy Doody Dcss ''L"" 630 

Standard Brands: T .(^"StSA *... 

royal puddings. ^^J.?^** 

gelatin r^f? 1 ^"™ 

7SNT 481 ErWl, 1: W ,' B * y 

Bat** '/. hr$2800 N * T ., ... M JL 

COLOR D6r •* hr $Z8O0 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Ding Dong Sehl 

10-10:30 
Manhattan Soap 
SB&W 

t.t a 10-10 't5 
Colgate: Bates 
P&G: BB&T 

V* hr $1,600 



No network 

programing 

m-t 



Erni'a Kovacs 



NY 



Show 



Home 
m-( 11-11 



NY L&F 

(see mon) 
Partlc sponsors: 
Wear- Ever Prods 
F&S &R 

11. J. Heinz 

Max oil 

Hills Bros 
Ted Bate* 
Peerless Elec: 

broll-qulk 
Zlew* Co 

1-mln partlc: 
time & tal $7000 



Tennessee Ernie 

I Ford Show 
P&G: 12-12:15 
llv m-f L 

B&B 



Feather Yawr 

Nast 

Colgate Palmollve 

altd 12:30-45 

NY m-r L 

Eaty 



4- 



No network 
programing 

m r 



Garry Moore 

Lever Broa JWT 

Gen Motor* 

10-10:15 

I -lors 

w 10:15-10:30 

Arthur Godfrey 

w 10:30-45 

Easywasher 

BBDO 

10:30-10:45 

BBDO 

Brletl : Myre.Y&R 

m.w 10:45-11 
SI) Var L 

aimul '/* hr $3995 

Godfrey (cont'd) 
Lever: pepsodenl 

m.w 11-11:15 

JWT 

Plllsbury Mills 

m-th 11:15-30 
Leo Burnett 



Network 
programing 
dlscon 1 



Strike It Rich 

Colgate 

m-r 

(see moni 

Eaty 



Valiant Lady 

General Mills 
m, w, f 
DF8. K-R 



No network 

programing 

m-r 



Love »f 


Lit* 


Amer Home F 


m-f (see 


mon) 


B-B-T 




Search f»r 


Tom'w 


P&G: 


Joyt 


m-f (see 


mon) 


B-B-T 





Guiding Light 
P&G: Ivory, duit 

m-t (see mon) 
Comoton 



Jack 
NT 



Paar 8how 
m-f V 



No network 



No network 

programing 

m-r 



Love Story 

P&G: prell. 

ivory snow 

m-t (see mon) 



DFS 



Robert 
84NT 



Lewla 
Tj 



No network 
programing 

m-r 



No network 

programing 

m-r 



aust 
Vi hr $3000 



ter 
45 



Art Llnkletter 

f.ever- si? 
m.w.r 2:30 
BB DO 
Plllsbury Mills 
m-th 2:45-3 
(see mon i 
Burnett 



NBC's Matinee 

Theatre 

partlc sponsors 

HY L 



Im Festival 
st 1/16 
pai I U 






Big Payoff 

Colgate 

m.w.r 

(see mon) 

F«ty 

NT 



B ob Crosb y 

General Mlll> 
m.w.f 3:45-4 

44Hv I. 

Knox- H hr 

XT % hr $3,700 



Way of the 

World 

BorrJten Co 

NT m.w.f L 

V&B I 

Modern 

Romances 

Colgate 

B. Houston 



Queen for 
Day 



Afternoon 
Film Festival 

st 1/16 
partlc 



Brlrjhter Day 

PAO 
m-f (see mnnt 

XT Y&B 

The Seeret Storm 
Am Home Prods: 
m-f (see mon) 
B-B-T 

On Your Account 

(Win Elliott) 
P&G: tide, prell 

m-r 

XT 

Benton & Bowie* 



Pinky Le* 

Show 
Hy m-f L 
Partlc: Gen Fdt: 

Inst jell-o 

Y&R tu.w.t 

Howdy Doody 

Kellogg Co: 

rice krisples* 

51NT 44L 

LB (see bell 

tu.tta 5:30-45 



Mickey Mout* 
Club 
m-r 
BBDO 

Vlcks 5-5:15 

Gen'l Mill* 

m-w-r 

5:15-5:30 

5:45-6 
Knox Reeves. 
Esty 
Mattel 

alt with 
Carsosv-Jtoberts 
SOS 



No network 
programing 



Colgate: ttbpst 
51NT 5:45-6 48L .. 
Bataa V* hr $2800 MeC-E 5:30-5:4* 

**r '/< hr $2.800 



Ding Dont 

School 

10-10:30 

Wander Co: 

ovalllne 10:15-30 

Tath am -Laird 

CD ml I. 

V, hr $1,600 



Ernie Kovacs 

Show 

NT I. 






No n.- 

progrc 



Home 

m-r 11 12 

NY LAP 1 

I see mon & tu) 



1-mln partlc: 
lime & tal $7000 



No ne 

:-rocT.- ; 



Tennessee Ernie 

Ford Show 
Procter & Gamble 

12-12:15 
B&B 
Hy m-t L 



Feather Yaw- 
Nest 
Colgate Pa Imollv* 

alt d 12:30-45 
NY ml L 
Eaty 



No ne 
progra 






No network 

programing 

m r 



No ne 
progra 



No network 
programing 

m-f 



No ne 
progra 



NBC's Matinee 


After 


Theatre 


Film 1 


partlc sponsor* 


st 1 


NY t. 


par 



Way of the 
World 

Borden Co 
NY m.w.f L 
Y&R 





Modern 
Romance 






After 




Colgate 


Film 1 




B. Houston 


st 1 










Queen for a 






Day 






XY I 






Pinky Lm 




Hy rr r 1 


, Mickey 


Partlc: Gen Fds 




Inst 'ell-o 


S. C. 


Johnsn & Johnsi 




Y&R il.w. 


1 NL&B 




Campbe' 






Burnett 



Haw 

Contir; 
wrmn°- - - * - 
hostess cik 



4TNT 



5:30 



5:15-5:31 

Bristol 

Y&R £ 

XT 

.•91 per '/, h 



OGRAMS 



Daytime 6 February 1956 




twork 
mlng 

r 



twork 
mlng 
f 



twork 
mlng 



twerk 
mlng 
f 



TH U RSDAY 



FRIDAY 



twork 
mine 







Garry Moore 

Hazel Bishop 

Spector 

alt. uks 

North 

th 10 10 :15 

Chun King: JWT 

Tonl: Burnett 

alt th 10:15-30 

55-75NY L 

•A hr $3,140 

Arthur Godfrey 

Bristol Myers 

Y&R 

10:30-10:45 

Amer Home 

10:45-11 

BBT 

Godfrey (cont'd) 

Kellogg 

Burnett 

Plllsbury Mills 
m-th 11:15-30 

Leo Burnett 

40Var L 

slmul '/< hr $3995 



Strike It Rich 

Colgate 
m-f (Bee moo) 
Esty 



Valiant Lady 

Tonl Co 

NY « 

Weiss & Geller 

Love of Lite 
Amer Home R 
m-f (see mon) 
B-B-T 

Search for Tom'w 

P&G: Joyt 

m-f (see mon) 

B-B-T 

Guiding Light 

P&G: Ivory, duzt 
m-f (see mon) 

Com n ton 



Jack Paar Shew 
NY m-f L 



Love Story 
P&G: prell. 

Ivory snow 
m-f (see mon) 

OFS 



Robert Q Lewis 

Ralston Purina 
Co alt wks 

GBB 

2:15-2:30 

sust 
V* hr $3,150 

Art l.inkletter 
Kellogg: all r>r 
52Hy L 

LB tu.th 2:3 0-45 
Ptllsbury M1I1> 

m-th 2:45-3 
IB H. hr M.nnn 



noon 
'estival 
/16 
tic 



Bio PavofT 
NT m-f 

su» tn.fh 



Boh Crosby 

Tonl On 

Weiss & Gcller 

th 8:30-45 



noon 
: estival 

/1 6 



Scott Paper 
th 3:45-4 
70Tfy I 

I W Thompson 



Brighter Day 
P&G 

m-f (see mon) 

Y&R 

The Secret Storm 
Amer Home Prs 
m-f (see mon) 

B-B-T 



On Your Account 

'Win TTUlott) 
P&G: tide, prell 

m-f 
Benton & Bowlet 



Mouse 

|0 

Johnson 
Son 

5-5:15 
1 Soups 

i, 6:45-8 
-Myers 
• :30-5:45 

r 

r $2,800 



No network 
programing 



SATURDAY 



Network 
programing 
discontinued 



oiny Dong School 
Manhattan Soap 

SB&W 10-10:15 

Gerber Prods 
D'Arcy 10:15-30 
Ch m-f L 

'/„ hr $1,160 



Ernie Kovacs 

Show 

NY L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Garry Moore 
Gen Mills DFS 

f 10-10: 15 
Lever Bros JWT 

f 1 0:15-10 :30 

803: McC-E 

alt f 10:30-45 

CBS-Hytron 

B&N 10:30-45 

Converted Rice 
Burnett 

Alt Wks 
Prudential C&H 

f 10:45-11 
55-85NT L 

V* hr $3,140 



Network 
programing 
discontinued 



Home 

m-f 11-12 

NY T.&P 

(see mon & tu) 



1-mln panic: 
time & tal $7000 



Tennessee Ernie 

Ford Show 
Procter* Gamble 

12-12:15 seg 
Hy m-f L 

Benton & Bowles 

Feather Your 

Nest 

Colgate-Palmolive 

alt d 12:30 -45 
R . J. Reynolds : 

vrlnston eifs 
15 mlti. 3 th in 4 
NY m-f Ii 
Eaty 



No Beiwork 

programing 

m-f 



Garry Moore 

(cont'd) 

Yardley of Lndn 

Ayer f 11- 11:15 

Ralston-Purina 

GBB alt wks 

Masland A&C 

11:15-30 L 

VL. hr $2038 

Strike It Rich 

Colgate 
m-f 
'nee mon) 
Esty 




ant Lady 

General Mills 
m. w, f 
DFS. K-R 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Love of Life 
Amer Home Pr 
(m-f (see mon) 
B-B-T 



Search for Tom'w 
P&G: Joyt 
m-f (see mon* 
B-B-T 



Guiding Light 
P&G: ivory, duzt 

m-f (see mon' 
Campion 



Jack 
NY 



Paar Show 
m-f L 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Love 


Story 


P&G: 


prell, 


ivory 


snow 


m-f (see mon) 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



Robert Q Lewis 
Brown & Wmsn: 
viceroy — alt tvk 

Bates 2-2:15 

2:15-2:30 sust 

49NT L 

'A hr $3,150 
Art Llnklettei 
Lever: smr 

BBDO ni.w.f 

Hawaiian 

Pineapple 

Ayer z:45-3 

(!4Hy L 

»4hr $40« 



NBC's Matinee 

Theatre Afternoon 

partlc sponsors Film Festival 
HY L st 1/16 



Rt« Payoff 

folgnte 
m.w.f 

(see i 



Estv 






Way of the 

World 

NT I, 

Modern 

Romances 

Colgate 

B. Houston 



Afternoon 
Film Festival 



Queen for 
Day 
NT 



Bob Crosby 
SOS: McCann-E 
Gerber: D'Arcy 

alt f 3:30-45 

General Mills 
41Hy 3:45-4 T, 
Knox- M hr 

Reeves $3100 



Brighter Day 
P&G 

m-f (see mon) 
Y&R 

The Secret Storm 
Am Home Prods: 
m-f (see mon) 
B-B-T 



On Your Account 

(Win Elliott) 
P&G: tide, prell 

m-f 
Benton & Bowles 



Pinky Lee 
43Hy m-f X. 
Partlc: Intl Shoe 
H.H&McD th 



Howdy Doody 
Kellogg Co 
tu.th (see tu> 
Leo Burnett 
standard Brand* 
Batot ■» 1 

'/« hr $2,80O 



Mickey Mouse 
Club 

Lettuce. Ine 

J. Cohan 
alt wks with 
Morton Salt 
NL&B 

m-f 

Gen'l Mills 

m-w-f 

8:15-5:30. 5:45-6 

Knox Reeves 

& Esty 
Mars Candy 
5:30-5:45 
Burnett 

NT F 

or V, hr $2,8*0 



The New 

Revue 

(colorcast) 

NY L 



Olng Dong School 

10-10:30 

Colgate: Bate* 

alt f 10-10 :15 

General Mills: 

Tath am -Laird 

r 10:15-30 seg 

'/„ hr $1,160 



Hollywood 

Backstage 

Chas Antell 

m-w-f 
tu, th sust 
NY 



No network 

programing 



Capt. Kangaroo 
10-10:30 



Wlnky Dink 
And You 

sust 
10:30-11 




Home 

m-f 11-12 

NY L&F 

(see moo & to) 



l-mlo partle: 
time & tal $7000 



Tennessee Ernie 

Ford Show 
Procter* Gamble 

12-12:15 seg 
Hv m-f L 

Benton & Bowles 

Feather Yaur 
Neat 

^olgatA-PaJjBOllve 
alt d 12:30-45 
NT m-f L 



No network 
programing 



Mighty Mouse 
Playhouse 



Tales of 
Texas Rangers) 
General Mills 
Tatham- 

Laird SI 6. 000 

alt wks 
Curtiss Candy 
C. L. Miller 



No network 
programing 



The Big Top 
National Dairy 
Prods: sealtest 
ice cream, seal- 
test dairy prods 
69Ph!le Tj 



Eaty 



Lone Ranger 

General Mills: 

wheatles. kli 

51NY F 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 
programing 



DFS 



$18,000 



Capt Midnight 
Wander 
T. Laird 



No network 

programing 

m-f 



No network 
programing 



Pacific Coast 

Conference 

Basketball 

2-3:45 

Amana 

Maury, Leo 

Marshall 



NBC's Matinee 

Theatre 
partlc sponsors 
Hy L 



No network 
programing 



Big Ten 

Basketball 

sust 3-5 pm 



Way of the 

World 
Borden Co 
NY m.w.f L 
Y&R 

Modern 

Romances 

Colgate 

B. Houston 



Queen for 
Day 
NY 



No network 
programing 



Big Ten 

Basketball 

sust 3-5 pm 



Pinky Lea 
Hy m-f L 
"i-'fr: Gen Fdst 
v « R tu.w.f 



Howdy Doody 

Luden's 

Mat hes 5 :30-45 

Tntl Sh: H.H&Ma 

alt f 5:45 -6 
Teii* Grp Juice 
DCSS alt f 5:45-8 
rffNTv 46t 

% hr $S.8W 



No network 
programing 



No network 
programing 



Fury 

General 
NT 
B&B 



Paul Win 
Shew 

cust 



Chose Up S 



Mr. Wij. 
sust 



No nelttu 

profreml' 



No netwo 
program!! 



NBA Baskt 



NBA Baske 

(cont'd) 



No nettm 

program!' 






— '■' 




THE J7W* &ME OUT /I DMLlllHT 



for "SATURDAY SHOWCASE" with DEL COURTNEY 



. . . and Del Courtney's 

"MOVIE MATINEE" 

offers the top-rated 

week-day afternoon 

feature film participation 

program in San Francisco. 



It's only natural that the top names in the entertainment world 
play San Francisco. And it's equally natural that they appear on 
San Francisco's number one TV variety show. . . Del Courtney's 
"Saturday Showcase." It's Northern California's big buy, as 
America's greatest entertainers sing, dance and play for an esti- 
mated weekly audience of 250,000. The cost? Just $100.00 per 
participation. Ask your Katz man for full details. 



NO SELLING CAMPAIGN IN SAN FRANCISCO 

IS COMPLETE WITHOUT THE WBC STATION 



kt>! 

CHAN 



■^1^ WESTINGHOUSE BROADCASTING COMPANY, INC. 

9 m ® 



CHANNEL 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Representee/ by the Katz Agency 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



77 




PEGGY STONE 
New York 



". . . and ALWAYS FIRST in low- 
est cost-per-thousand listeners in 
every quarter hour segment, any 
day, every day, all day — and night! 



6 A.M.- 


-6 P.M 




6 DAYS A WEEK* 


Denver Share 


of Aud 


ience 


Network A . . 


. # 


. 18.75 






14.50 






. 13.50 






. 12.25 


Independent B . 


. . 


. 10.75 


Independent C 


. . 


. 8.25 






. 7.50 


Independent D . 




. 6.50 


Independent E . 




. 1.75 


Independent F . 


. 


. 1.25 


*Pulse, November 


1955 





Call Lee Mehlig, KTLN in 
Denver, or any KTLN 
national representative for 
the complete KTLN story" 



NEW YORK— Radio Representatives, Inc. 
CHICAGO— Radio Representatives, Inc. 
LOS ANGELES— Lee O'Connell Co. 
SAN FRANCISCO— Bill Ayres Co. 
SOUTH— Clarke Brown Co. 
SEATTLE— Hugh Feltis & Asstes. 
PORTLAND— "a" Cox & Asstes. 



KTL 



Denver's 24-hour Voice 
of Music — Colorado's 
Most Powerful, Most 
Listened-to Independent 



LEONARD COE, Owner and Operator 

78 



where tv exposure helped tremendously. 

"It is doubtful that this picture, 
telling a simple story and starring 
unknowns, done in black-and-white 
without the added glamor of Cinema- 
scope, VistaVision or any of the other 
box-office incentives, could have done 
nearly as well without the tv history. 
It's the type of picture that people must 
see in order to talk about it. Tv created 
the word-of-mouth and the public came 
running." 

SPONSOR, feeling that the tv activities 
of the major studies, may eventually 
present a serious threat to the inde- 
pendent tv film producers, talked to 
Desi Arnaz (Desilu), Hal Roach (Hal 
Roach Studios), Jack Gross (Gross- 
Krasne), Warren Lewis (Four-Star), 
and others. The reports of these men 
proved that they are not only not 
worried, but that their plans for 1956 
include very active inroads into the 
fields of feature motion picture pro- 
duction. 

► How do you feel about the major 
studios getting into tv film production? 

Desi Arnaz (Desilu) : "If you'd asked 
me a year ago, I'd have said that I was 
worried. I'm not worried any longer. 
It's a lot easier to be used to working 
under the limitations imposed by tv, 
and then to branch out into feature 
production, than it is to suddenly try 
and channel the thinking, which for 
years has been used to roaming in the 
limitless expanse of motion pictures, 
into the rigid schedule, time and money 
requirements of tv. Personally I expect 
to do a lot better with the feature 
picture, which I have planned for this 
coming year, in the theatrical field, 
than the majors have done when they 
invaded our field." 

Wynn Nathan (MCA-Revue Produc- 
tions) : "They haven't got a thing that 
we haven't got. We can hire the same 
people, we can get the same facilities 
if we haven't got them already, and 
believe it or not, we've got much more 
money." 

Jack Chertock (Independent): 
"There's room for everybody. It's all 
one big business, and there are things 
which I can do that they can't, and 
vice-versa. What makes it tough for 
them is that they're not used to the 
limitation, under which we have to 
work in tv. A picture has to run ex- 
actly 26 1 /2 minutes or 54 minutes and 
it must be ready on a certain day, and 
it can't cost more than X number of 



dollars. These considerations never 
existed in feature production in that 
same manner. On the other hand, every 
once in a while our artistic tempera- 
ment rebels against these selfsame 
limitations, and that's when we begin 
to think in terms of features or plays. 
Personally, I'm planning one feature 
and one Broadway play for 1956." 

In talking to the independent tv film 
producers, SPONSOR found that most 
except MCA are planning feature pic- 
ture production in 1956. Thinking 
that this might limit the number of 
tv film shows available to advertisers, 
SPONSOR tried to dig further into the 
reasoning behind these moves. 

► Are you planning to curtail your tv 
production in order to devote more 
time to features? 

"Tv films are our primary business. 
We will produce a many as we need 
to satisy our clients and as we feel we 
might be able to sell to sponsors or 
networks. But there is an artistic chal- 
lenge in picture production. There it 
is not the judgment of the advertiser, 
but that of the paying public, which 
determines whether what we have pro- 
duced is a success or failure. It is to 
meet this challenge that we are plan- 
ning to make features." 

► Do you think the production of 
features is more lucrative than tv film? 

"Not necessarily. The initial risk 
is greater, and if you've made a hit, 
the rewards are tremendous. But a 
flop, which might slide by in the f rame- 
work of a tv series, will result in sub- 
stantial losses in the case of a feature. 
But that's showbusiness." 

► Aside from the desire to leave the 
limitation of tv (and to make mony, 
of course), what other specific incident 
made you decide to produce a feature? 

"The finding of a story. In produc- 
ing hundreds of tv films, we read 
thousands and thousands of stories. 
Every once in a while, there'll be a 
story that would suffer from presenta- 
tion in half-hour or hour form, but 
that would make a magnificent piece of 
entertainment in the scope of a feature 
picture. The finding of such a story 
property is the first step toward the 
planning of a feature. In that way we 
have a great advantage over the 
majors. They have to make so many 
features a year, in order to satisfy 

SPONSOR 




THE 
PAY-OFF SPOT! 

for 

lasting 

Impressions 

in 

Los Angeles 

and 

Southern California 




WiMmSii\ 




SPOT SALES 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



79 



the theatres. We don't. We'll make 

one when we're sure that the story 

we've found points toward a great 
picture." 



• • • 



MARKETING MALARKEY 

{Continued from page 35) 

uct-moving advertising will ever hold 
a client when the going gets rough." 

Advertising has been defined as "a 
public notice." Today it is much more 
intricate than this. How to get the 
public to notice your notice would be 
more appropriate. Advertising now, 
more than at any other time, has to be 
new, fresh, smack of ingenuity and 
creativeness. Top advertising is not 
the advertising that waits until the 
other fellow has developed it, and then 
you tag on, hopping the caboose as it 
pulls out of the yard. 

Advertising people can't be afraid 
of an unusual idea. And the ones who 
are searching for it like the Leo Bur- 
netts will spur their creative people to 
the last drop of perspiration for that 
right idea. Because it is this creative, 
unusual, imaginative idea that the cli- 
ent seeks, needs. 

Look around your office and see if 



you have any trouble spotting a con- 
tact man who would prefer to take a 
campaign out to his client that looks 
almost exactly like the leader in the 
field. 

Any trouble spotting him? 

It is easier to be busy getting the 
client tickets for a Broadway show, 
going to lunch with the network man, 
slopping by Saks to exchange the gift 
the wife didn't like or getting the latest 
cliche from The Avenue than it is to 
be busy thinking. 

The battle of advertising campaign 
lcok-alikes is being fought on all me- 
dia fronts. Watch television for a 
night, look at the national publica- 
tions, your newspaper, listen to the ra- 
dio, glance at the outdoor displays. 
They have one thing in common — 
sameness. 

But then there's always the one ad- 
vertising man, the one agency that re- 
fuses to follow the others, who resists 
the usual, as they say in one of the 
agencies here in New York. This is 
the advertising man, the agency that 
comes up with the new campaign that 
the others will follow, the campaign 
that's just damned good creative ad- 
vertising and not covered with the 
schmaltz of marketing. 



There are actually whole industries 
which are characterized by antiquated 
advertising. What is wrong with the 
admen who are working on these ac- 
counts? And more important, what is 
wrong with the agencies who are taking 
the 15% from these accounts? 

There is no such thing as good ad- 
vertising. Only better advertising. 
Have you forced the advertising for 
which you are responsible to be better? 
Or have you let your client tell you 
that he didn't want to go into any 
major changes in advertising? Or to 
increase his budget? 

Perhaps to work on his forecast, 
plan his cost of goods, doodle with his 
inventory sheets, spend hours talking 
about the intricacies of manufacturing 
or refigure salesmen's commissions 
would assure the frustrated agencyman 
that he was justifying his relationship 
with the client and serving him better. 

The adman's job is to keep the client 
constantly going forward through ad- 
vertising, protecting the product image 
through advertising, making its per- 
sonality stronger in the eyes of the 
public through advertising, expanding 
it and doing battle constantly to get a 
new idea and story line on the air, into 
print and see it do a job. 



:SHMMMMHHjg[ , 




TV in Fresno — the big 
inland California marker-- 



KMJ-TV 



• Best local programs 

• Basic NBC-TV affiliate 



PAUL H. RAYMER, NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE 




80 



SPONSOR 




ARE YOU 

HALF-COVERED 




IN 
NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG 



^ 



#> 



-TV 









^ 



WKZO-TV— GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
WKZO RADIO — KALAMAZOOBATTLE CREEK 
WJEF RADIO— GRAND RAPIDS 
WJEF-FM _ GRAND RAPIDS-KALAMAZOO 
KOLNTV — LINCOLN, NEBRASKA 

Associated with 
WMBD RADIO— PEORIA. ILLINOIS 



THIS 

AREA 

IS 

LINCOLN- 
LAND 




42-COUNTY 
LINCOLN-LAND AREA TELEPULSE 
Share of Audience — September, 1955 




KOLN-TV 


"B" 


"C" 


"D" 


MONDAY THRU FRIDAY: 

1 :00 — 6:00 p.m. 
6:00 — 11:00 p.m. 

SATURDAY: 

1:00 — 6:00 p.m. 
6:00 — 11:00 p.m. 

SUNDAY: 

1:00 — 6:00 p.m. 
6:00— 11:00 p.m. 


50 
53 

52 
50 

34* 
35 


21 
18 

15 
13 

36 
22 


13 
14 

15 
15 

13 
14 


11* 
11* 

8 
17 

16* 
23 


•Does not broadcast (or complete period and the share 
of audience is unadjusted for this situation. 



KOLN-TV, one of America's great area stations, covers 
Lincoln-Land, 95.5% OF WHICH IS OUTSIDE THE 
GRADE "B" AREA OF OMAHA. This important market is 
as independent of Omaha as South Bend is of Fort Wayne — 
Hartford of Providence — or Syracuse of Rochester! 

Lincoln-Land consists of 42 counties with 200,000 families 
— 125,000 unduplicated by any other TV station! 

Telepulse credits KOLN-TV with 138.1% more afternoon 
Lincoln-Land viewers than the next station — 194.4% more 



rhtti 



line viewers! 



Let Avery-Knodel give you the whole story on KOLN-TV, 
the official CBS-ABC outlet for South Central Nebraska 
and Northern Kansas. 

CHANNEL 10 • 316,000 WATTS • 1000-FT. TOWER 

KOLN-TV 

COVERS LINCOLN-LAND —NEBRASKA'S OTHER BIG MARKET 

Avery-Knodel. Inc., Exclusive National Representatives 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



81 



In The West 



The 

Best 
Negro 

Market 
Buy! 

94% 

NEGRO 
PROGRAMMING 

KSAN 

SAN FRANCISCO 

RICHARD BOTT, Station Manager 



Represented Nationally by 
Stars National Inc. 



The Big Street can get bigger and 
more important because it holds the 
key to success for any company. But 
the men who walk it (in their subdued 
suits and narrow-brimmed hats) should 
take pride in knowing advertising, 
what it will do, how it can do it. 

You can be sure that the next gener- 
ation of admen will find that their 
stature is a lot more enhanced because 
some admen today took their business 
seriously and made their clients bigger 
through better advertising. Not being 
frustrated marketing men. 

I've dusted off the marketing con- 
cept in no uncertain terms. I feel 
vehement because I fear an era in 
which creative advertising men play 
at a role for which they are not 
qualified. But I will allow this to the 
marketing concept: If properly chan- 
neled, it can provide the agency and 
client with a certain depth. A sub- 
stitute for creative thinking, no. An 
adjunct to it, definitely. 

The agency can hire a marketing 
man, a whole room full of them in fact. 
But keep them in that room. Let them 
delve into consumer research. Let 
them suggest selling strategy. Bring 
their sugguestions to the client and 
make their findings available to the 
creative staff. 

Perhaps thereby the agency will be 
in a better position to create a cam- 
paign based on the solidest facts about 
the product. 

But frankly, having conceded this 
role to the marketing man, I can't 
help but feel we've accomplished the 
same thing in years past without hiring 
platoons of specialists. What agency of 
any stature has launched into an 
account without getting a thorough 
analysis of marketing needs from the 
client's own specialists? What great 
campaign sprang out of some creative 
man's mind without inspiration from 
the needs of the market place itself? 

You literally can't create a great tele- 
vision commercial or any other ad with- 
out saturating yourself in knowledge of 
who buys, why and when. It's just a 
question of who supplies these facts to 
the creative men — client specialists or 
the agency's own marketing sleuth. 

Perhaps I'm narrowing the field of 
the marketing man by stressing his 
role as a fact-finder. I know it's been 
said in sponsor's series, for example, 
that the marketing man can be an 
active participant in client sales 
strategy. Maybe so. But forgive me. 
I cannot help but see it as the airiest 



relationship yet invented. The agency 
is entering a room into which it has 
not been invited. And I fear in the 
process everyone becomes an Indian 
chief in charge of strategy and nobody 
sticks to the job of actually selling 
through effective advertising. * * * 



ARMSTRONG 

{Continued from page 37) 

plank floors of yesteryear but made in 
a seamless material that won't catch 
dirt . . . like all Armstrong Quaker 
Floor Coverings . . . they're easy on 
the pocketbook. Just $12 to $15 is all 
you pay to cover an average-size room, 
wall-to-wall. . . ." 

Copy for the quality line of perma- 
nent floorings (inlaid linoleum, plastic, 
rubber, asphalt, cork, and other tiles) 
follows a similar vein but the video 
may show a home instead of an apart- 
ment and appeals to the owner rather 
than the renter or farmer, again stress- 
ing the practical angle, with Ruth 
Jackson doing the spiel. Most of the 
commercials promote this quality line 
as "the modern fashion in floors." 

Basically, that has been the approach 
since Armtrong went on tv in 1950. 
"Consistency, insistency, persistency," 
as Chairman of the Board H. W. 
Prentis Jr. used to say when he was ad 
manager of the company more than 
30 years ago. "You won't accomplish 
much by just saying, 'Buy our product/ 
Advertising must render a service to- 
your prospect," he maintained. 

It wasn't till last fall, with the longer 
format, that time was set aside for an 
institutional message to promote the 
company as a whole and its full line 
of products — building materials and 
flooring products, packaging materials, 
and industrial specialities. 

And, institutionally speaking, says 
BBDO Account Executive Roy Dreher, 
"The company feels that Circle 
Theatre has done more to promote the 
over-all company story than anything 
done before in advertising because it is 
reaching the kind of people it wants 
to reach and puts them in a receptive 
frame of mind for its message." 

Of the five minutes allotted for com- 
mercial copy on the program, up to a 
minute is devoted to the opening insti- 
tutional announcement. Between acts 
come the two two-minute commercials 
for 1) the permanent floors, and 2) 
the low-cost, printed floor coverings. 
A tail-end cross-plug goes to Pontiac, 
which returns the favor in kind during 






82 



SPONSOR 



CHAMP 

WINS 
AGAIN 



by 5 to 1 margin 



WHEN IT COMES TO SALES PUNCH in 
the important Baton Rouge area, WAFB- 
TV has proved its supremacy by a country 
mile! 




In the latest Telepulse (Nov. 
1955) , WAFB-TV was first in 
347 quarter hours per week, 
compared to 78 quarter hours 
on station B . . . . giving WAFB- 
TV a leadership of nearly five 
to one. 



ALL THIS AND MERCHAN- 
DISING TOO! Take over- 
whelming viewer preference, as 
demonstrated by this survey, 
and add a merchandising record 
that's second to none; (1) First place win- 
ner in recent "Lucy Show" competition 
with a double first prize for special mer- 
chandising job, (2) First place in Screen 
Gems, Inc. contest on program promotion, 
(3) Among top four in "Frank Leahy and 
His Football Forecasts", and you've got a 
sales potential that can't be beat. Wouldn't 
you like to put "The Champ" to work for 
you? 

6 FEBRUARY 1956 



MONDAY TO FRIDAY 



Stations 



WAFB-TV 

Sta. B 
Sta. C 



7 am- 1 2 noon 



62 

35 
3 



12 noon-6 pm 



51 



6 pm-12 pm 



54 

41 
5 





SATURDAY 


SUNDAY 


Stations 


1 pm-6 pm 


6 pm- 12 pm 


12 noon-6 pm 


6 pm-12 pm 


WAFB-TV 


32 a 


53 


61 


56 


Sta. B 


**6la 


41 


35 a 


41 


Sta. C 


7 


6 


4 


3 



** Special Alternate-Week Seasonal Broadcast 

a Does Not Broadcast Complete Period. Share Unadjusted. 



Call, write or wire: 

National Representative — Young Television Corp. 
South & Southwest — Clarke Brown Co. 

WAFB-TV 

affiliated with WAFB, AM-FM 



CBS — ABC 



200,000 WATTS 



83 



its hour on the stage. 

Program approach. Indicative, per- 
haps, of the contrasting approaches 
taken by both Pontiac and Armstrong 
in their mutual efforts to score against 
Question is the recent success the 
latter has had with "Nightmare in 
Red," a filmed documentary about the 
birth of Communism in Russia. Origi- 
nally, NBC, which produced the show, 
offered it as a spectacular in its 
Project 20 series, then announced 
Pontiac had bought it to kick off its 
Playwrights '56 show. The deal fell 



through and it's been said the reason 
had something to do with GM's reluc- 
tance to embarrass its former chief, 
Defense Secretary Charles E. Wilson, 
in the afterglow of the Geneva Confer- 
ence. (Said afterglow, of course, 
shortly thereafter began to flicker 
rather violently and by 27 December, 
when "Nightmare" was shown on 
Armstrong's program, served as an 
appropriate backdrop.) Although the 
standard Circle Theatre format calls 
for live productions, Armstrong bought 
the film for its impact and public 
service value. 



N E WS 



. . . the TopekAREA audience pre- 
fers to view it on WIBW-TV, and 
also SPORTS, WEATHER, and 
FARM SERVICE, according to Dr. 
Forest Whan's TV Study of the 
TopekAREA, a free copy of which 
is yours for the asking. 



TOPEKA, KANSAS 

Ben Ludy, Gen. Mgr. 
WIBW & WIBW-TV in Topeka 

KCKN in Kansas City 
Rep: Capper Publications, Inc. 

CBS • ABC 




The Kansas View Point 



NBC and Armstrong together pulled 
out all stops in promoting the filmed 
report, the former with the full treat- 
ment usually accorded a spectacular, 
including 40 network announcements 
during the week immediately preceding 
the presentation. Armstrong, over the 
signatures of President C. J. Back- 
strand and Ad Director Banzhaf, sent 
letters to thousands of business leaders, 
corporation heads, educators, cus- 
tomers, etc., inviting them to tune in. 

Result: Circle Theatre's highest 
Trendex rating till then, 16.5 and 15.8, 
and, interestingly, a rating for 
Question that was one of the few under 
40 since the Armstrong series began. 

Seven days after "Nightmare" ap- 
peared, NBC's director of information, 
Michael Horton, memoed Producer 
Henry Salomon: "Immediately follow- 
ing 'Nightmare in Red' approximately 
550 telephone calls were made to NBC 
on this program — very few of them 
complaints. This would appear, within 
the recollection of old-timers here, to 
be just about the biggest telephone 
reaction to a program in recent years, 
excluding special events of controver- 
sial nature." 

About the same time, mailbags arriv- 
ing at the Lancaster post office were 
heavy with letters postmarked all over 
the country praising the show, compli- 
menting the company, and — bless them 
— promising to "support your company 
from now on whenever I need anything 
that is manufactured by Armstrong 
Cork Co." Many suggested that the 
company publish the commentary in 
pamphlet form or requested loan of the 
film on kines. Practically all expressed 
deep gratitude for the great public 
service rendered. 

Followed a hurried conference be- 
tween client and agency — and a deci- 
sion, announced within a few days, to 
repeat the showing only four weeks 
after the original offering. This, while 
not unprecedented, is uncommon. 

(Second time around, "Nightmare" 
drew 17.1 for the first half-hour and 
12.9 for the second.) 

Meanwhile, Banzhaf, along with 
Dreher and Cummings, was privately 
glowing over another bit of intelli- 
gence. Ever since the series began, 
they'd been doggedly, frustratingly — ■ 
and hopelessly — trying to get the rating 
for the show's second half-hour up on 
a par with the first half-hour. 

The way it seemed to figure, they 
had two strikes against them before 
they even stepped into the box: normal 



84 



SPONSOR 




STUDIO AND OFFICES WEST HARTFORD, CONN. 



— Represented by The Bollinq Company, Inc. 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



85 



IS 
PENNSYLVANIA'S 



IN VOUB PICTURE 




WJAC-TV is the Number One 
Station not only in Johnstown, 
but in Altoona as well, and this 
one-two punch covers an area 
that rates 4th in the rich state 
of Pennsylvania, and 28th in 
the entire country. 

Well over half a million (583,- 
600 to be exact) television fam- 
ilies look to WJAC-TV for the 
best in television entertainment. 

Add to this the free bonus of 
WJAC-TV coverage into Pitts- 
burgh, and you have a total 
market for your sales message 
that just can't be overlooked, if 
you really want to tap the po- 
tential of Southwestern Penn- 
sylvania. 




Get full details from your KATZ man! 



respective Trendex ratings for the first 
and second halves: 14.3 and 7.8; 18.5 
and 10.3; 14.1 and 7.0. Each time, 
their rating was virtually cut in half 
when Question came on. Question 
meantime was scoring, those same 
nights, with 54.1, 42.6, and 45.2. 

On the other hand, Banzhaf felt, 
he had one important fact going for 
him. Last fall, just about the time 
Circle Theatre was beginning its hour- 
long format he told SPONSOR it was 
his opinion that "when there's a 
one-hour show opposite a strong half- 
hour, and preceding the half-hour by 
30-minutes, it's the half-hour show that 
loses audience. ' On 29 November, two 
months and four shows later, he and 
the agency got their first glimmer of 
evidence that he was right. 

That was the night they did the 
story about Sanford. Me. (pop.: 
15,000), "The Town that Refused to 
Die." Based on a true story (as are 
all plays in the series) that first came 
to the attention of the agency through 
an editorial in a New York paper, it 
told how the citizens saved their small 
New England town after the major 
supporting industry pulled up stakes 
and left many of them unemployed. 

It was a warm story. But not par- 
ticularly warmer than any of the 
stories they had presented up to then. 
And it drew a 15.8 Trendex for the 
first half-hour — fair, but they'd done 
better. You see, that yvas the night 
Red Skelton. their first-half-hour com- 
petition, chose to turn in a 33.3 — his 
highest since the beginning of Circle 
Theatre's current season. And, a half- 
hour later Dr. Joyce Brothers was 
climbing through the ropes for her 
highly billed tune-up on her way to 
the top money: that night she was 
scheduled to answer the $32,000 
question. 

Yet, when the returns were in. Circle 
Theatres second half had got a 14.6 
and Question had dipped to 37.1, its 
lowest against the Armstrong entry. 

Requests for kines began pouring in 
and haven't stopped yet — many from 
chambers of commerce, planning com- 
missions, and similar organizations 
which of course represent an important 
segment of the kind of audience Arm- 
strong is anxious to impress favorably. 
Most significant was the fact that they 
had closed the gap between the first 
and second halves of their program — 
for that evening at least. Happily, the 
trend has continued since then, with 
only a .7 spread, as noted, for "Night- 



mare. 

"One thing we try for," says Miss 
Cummings, "is a strong second act 
yvith a gripping climax. The main 
thing at that point is to get the audi- 
ence to stay with us over the 10:00 
break." 

Story approach. That, largely is 
David Susskind's job, as producer for 
Talent Associates, which packages the 
job for BBDO. For although the 
agency occasionally will come up with 
an idea for a script like the Sanford 
one, story ideas originate mainly yvith 
Talent Associates. Briefly, here's the 
way it develops into a drama, as out- 
lined by agencygirl Cummings: 

Story conference: About every two 
weeks there is one between client 
( Banzhaf ) , agency I Dreher, Cum- 
mings ) , and packager (Susskind, 
Editor Jacqueline Babbin ) . (They 
usually meet in a Philadelphia hotel, 
somewhat midway between Lancaster 
and New York for convenience of all. ) 
Story ideas are submitted, discussed 
from all points of view. 

Writer: Enters picture here. Is 
hired by Talent Associates to work 
yvith editor and producer, writes first 
draft. 

Procedure: First draft received by 
agency and client. Discussions may 
folloyv. depending on condition of 
script. If it's a good one (rarely be- 
fore the fourth or fifth draft I, plav is 
scheduled and ready for casting. 

First reading: Cast and personnel 
involved (plus Cummings) gather for 
first reading, followed by smoothing- 
out process. 

Rehearsal, and then . . . 

Run-through: Shoyv is on its feet. 
On Saturday preceding telecast the 
group all goes to run-through, yvith 
additional changes. 

Air date, Tuesday: Show by this 
time has been rehearsing with cameras 
since Monday. Rehearsals go on all 
day; run-through at 3:00, dress at 
6:30, and on air at 9:30. 

In choosing to do "actuals," that is, 
authentic dramas yvith a built-in im- 
pact, Armstrong has created two major 
obstacles for itself. First, waiters can- 
not doctor up the story or alter the 
amount of turn-off during any dramatic 
show, plus the crushing impact of a 
40-50-rated show starting midway dur- 
ing their own. If one didn't finish 
them, the other usually did. 

For its first three efforts, for in- 
stance. Circle Theatre shoyved these 



86 



SPONSOR 






SHARE OF AUDIENCE RATINGS* 






MONDAY THRU FRIDAY 






STATIONS 


7 AM.- NOON- 
NOON 6 P.M. 


6 P.M.- 
MIDNIGHT 




WTHI 
WTTV 

Misc. 
Average *4 


65 46 

15 46 
20 9 
Hour H. U.T. 13.0 22.4 


65 

27 

8 

45.1 




•Pi 


Ise, November, 1955 













COVERAGE THAT 
COUNTS 



WTHI-TV delivers 391,760 TV 
homes in the Terre Haute area. 
108,000 of these are unduplicated 
CBS-TV homes. 



GOING PLACES 



WTHI-TV now carries CBS, NBC 
and ABC network shows, and is the 
only full-time station in the rich 
Terre Haute area. 



DOING A 
MAN-SIZED JOB 



ALL top 15 shows are on Channel 10 
according to the latest Pulse* 
survey : 



RANK 



SHOW 



1. / Love Lucy 

2. $64,000 Question 

3. December Bride 

4. Groueho Marx 

5. Talent Scouts 

6. Climax 

7. I've Got A Secret 

8. Burns and Allen 

9. Soldiers of Fortune 

10. Meet Millie 

11. Favorite Husband 

12. Ed Sullivan 

13. Eddie Cantor 

14. Honeymooners 

15. Phil Silvers 

•November, 1955 



STATION 

WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 
WTHI 



51.8 
50.3 
48.0 
45.3 
43.8 
43.1 
41.5 
41.3 
41.3 
40.5 
40.0 
39.4 
38.8 
38.8 
38.8 



WTHI-TV 



TERRE HAUTE, INDIANA 



REPRESENTED NATIONALLY BY THE BOLLING 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



87 




Bill Wright 

Star of 

Channel 13 Theatre 

3:30 to 4:15 Monday-Friday 

Stars SeN on 
Alabama's 

greatest TV station 




Birmingham 

"Watch the Birdie!" is the new 
feature of Channel 13 Theatre, 
seen weekday afternoons. In ad- 
dition to Little Rascals and 
Loony Tunes, "Uncle Bill" 
Wright conducts personal inter- 
views. Proof of his popularity is 
seen in his mail — over 500 let- 
ters a day. 

You can SELL 

Your Products 
to Alabama folks 
If you TELL 

them on programs 
they enjoy seeing 

Represented by 

BLAIR-TV 



circumstances to step up this impact. 
Second, the show can't lean on name 
stars ( much as they would help build 
audiences) because too often their 
familiarity might detract from the 
realness of the story. 

Instead, the series must depend on 
luilding a reputation for absorbing 
ntertainment provided by a mixture 
if facts and good acting. But then, 
the long haul is precisely the approach 
the company has always taken toward 
its advertising and promotion ever 
since Prentis predicted "linoleum for 
every room in the house" some 38 
years ago. That he and the company 
were both right is indicated in the fact 
that Armstrong sales volume has in- 
creased six times since the firm first 
began using air media. Its well-known 
radio series, Theatre of Today, was 
a CBS staple from 1941 to 1953. Since 
1941 sales volume rose from under 
$78 million to nearly $250 million last 

• ••••••• 
^'Canada is . . . second in the world in 
the original production of television 
programs. Actually Montreal and 
Toronto rate third and fourth on this 
continent, after New York and Holly- 
wood, as program production centres, 
and fourth and fifth in the whole 
world." 

A. D. DUNTON 
Chairman, Board of Governors, CRC 

• ••••••• 



stock 



was 



split 



year. The common 
3-for-l last spring. 

As for tangible results, Banzhaf 
finds encouragement in the expressions 
— spoken and written — by an increas- 
ing portion of the general public, Arm- 
strong's own field organization, and 
its customers. There is an increasing 
proportion of letters from thoughtful 
people — opinion leaders — expressing 
appreciation for the type of show the 
company is sponsoring. 

One curious development in recent 
weeks, in view of the intense rivalry 
for audience, is the switching of ac- 
counts that saw Revlon entrust the care 
of $64,000 Question to Armstrong's 
own agency. It was widely bruited 
about last fall that NBC was offering 
substantial enticements to Revlon to 
lure its smash program to its side of 
the fence. Rumor also had it that 
BBDO was an influence behind these 
offers. Both network and agency have 
denied the story. 

Asked to comment on the fact that 
both air-time rivals are in the same 
shop, a/e Dreher replied: "No com- 
ment." 

Added Banzhaf: "No comment — 
now." * -k -k 



LONDON TV 

{Continued from page 33) 

ute figure here because what you're 
getting in England is one minute.) 

For more average British tv shows 
your cost-per-1,000 rises to $8 or $9 so 
that in general British tv is quite a bit 
more expensive than U.S. television. 
And again this is for one minute only. 

Television today is being used by a 
remarkably large number and variety 
of sponsors. American firms using tv 
in England at the present moment in- 
clude, among others: Max Factor, 
Kleenex, Remington, Esso, Shell, Lux, 
Pepsodent, Kraft, Revlon, Brillo, Frigi- 
daire, Odo-Ro-No, Sunkist, Toni, Coca- 
Cola, Pepsi-Cola, General Motors, 
Sterling Drug. 

The main problem with British 
commercial tv today seems to be the 
total lack of experience on the part of 
management with any broadcast ad- 
vertising medium. This is reflected 
not only in the programs themselves 
but in the principles put forth by the 
ITA to guide programing contractors 
and advertisers. In the case of the 
programs, for example, commercials 
are supposed to occur at "natural pro- 
gram breaks." But they don't. Many 
of the commercials I saw seemed to 
me out of place, intrusive — and there- 
by objectionable. The reason for this 
seems to be that the people writing 
and directing material used on the ITA 
today have had no experience with 
inserting commercials in programs. 
( This explanation was cited to me by 
one of the ITA officials I had occasion 
to talk with.) 

The ITA, of course, is the Indepen- 
dent Television Authority, and is the 
government-created commission en- 
trusted with putting into effect the 
Television Act of 1954 passed by the 
British Parliament. It cannot be real- 
ly compared with our FCC because it 
actually operates the government- 
owned transmitter that broadcasts com- 
mercial television. Each of the two 
program contractors have their own 
studios but the minute the signal leaves 
the studio, it becomes the responsi- 
bility of ITA to transmit it. 

The ITA also appoints the program- 
ing contractors, and watches over 
them. As one important ITA official 
put it to me: "Actually we would like 
to exercise no control over the con- 
tractors, but it would be incorrect to 
say that we do not exercise any con- 
trol. We are in a sense policemen, and 
like policemen, the laws that we en- 



88 



SPONSOR 



mm 




(Left) John Daly 

American Broadcasting Company 

(Center) Douglas Edwards 

Columbia Broadcasting System 

(Right) John Cameron Swayze 
National Broadcasting Company 



99 



II v now switch you to... 



99 



In the split second after one of these famous 
commentators completes this sentence, you and 
millions of other viewers are whisked to Wash- 
ington or Los Angeles or anywhere else news is 
popping. The electronic miracle of television has 
given you a center aisle seat on the passing scene. 

But behind this miracle are the skills of Bell 
System and network technicians. These highly 
trained craftsmen blend the technical ability of 
an engineer with an actor's unerring ear for cues. 

Precisely on cue, push buttons are operated to 
make the connections that switch the television 
scene from one city to another. And Bell System 



technicians are receiving cues from several net- 
works at once. 

To help them, the Bell System receives operat- 
ing instructions from the networks which give all 
the necessary information on switches. This in- 
formation is sped to 130 Bell System television 
operating centers throughout the nation by private 
line telephone and teletypewriter systems. 

This co-operation between network and tele- 
phone company . . . and the teamwork along the 
Bell System lines . . . assure the American viewing 
public the smoothest programming and the best 
television transmission it is possible to provide. 



BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM (Tgk\ 

Providing transmission channels for intercity television today and tomorrow ^^*_^& 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



89 






l-TV 

BUFFALO 





2 heads are 
better than one 
...IN BUFFALO 



WGR-TV 

BUFFALO 



Nat. Reps. FREE & PETERS 



KCEN -TV 



^ON THE BEAM 

with 

CONSISTENTLY TOP PROGRAMMING 

CONSISTENTLY TOP RECEPTION 

from the 

WACO -TEMPLE 

"HUB" 

TO THE REMOTEST CORNERS OF ITS 

17,000 SQUARE MILE COVERAGE 

of the 

MULTI-MILLION DOLLAR 
CENTRAL TEXAS MARKET 



KCEN -TV 



TEMPLE, TEXAS 

General Offices: P. O. Box 188, Temple 

Sales Offices: Professional Bldg., Waco. 

Studios and Transmitter at Eddy, Texas — 

between Waco and Temple. 

TWX Eddy, Texas, No. 8486 

Representatives: 

National: GEORGE P. HOLLINGBERY COMPANY 

Texas: CLYDE MELVILLE COMPANY, 

Melba Building, Dallas 

CHANNEL £^VHF MAXIMUM POWER 
NBC INTERCONNECTED ^^____ 



force are not our own laws, but rather 
the laws of the land." These laws are 
really principles. In the case of pro- 
graming, it is in the job of the ITA to 
see that contractors maintain the fol- 
lowing in their program scheduling: 
taste, decency, political impartiality, 
balance (between cultural and enter- 
taining programs) and quality. I 
asked if anything had been presented 
to date that might be considered ques- 
tionable by these standards and was 
told that a film Orson Welles did on 
bull fighting had caused some un- 
favorable comment. 

Commercials: Their principles are 
even more rigid in the case of commer- 
cials themselves. For example, con- 
sider some of the particulars set forth 
in the ITA's publication. "Principles 
For Television Advertising." The fol- 
lowing is taken from the section deal- 
ing with advertising in children's pro- 
grams : 

"No advertisement which encour- 
ages children to enter strange places 
or to converse with strangers in an ef- 
fort to collect coupons, wrappers, la- 
bels, etc.. is allowed. The program 
contractor must investigate the details 
of any collection scheme and satisfy 
himself that it contains no element of 
danger to children." 

"No advertisement for a commer- 
cial product or service is allowed if it 
contains any appeal to children which 
suggests in any way that unless the 
children themselves buy or encourage 
other people to buy the product or 
service they will be failing in some 
duty or lacking in loyalty towards 
some person or organization whether 
that person or organization is the one 
making the appeal or not." 

Another section of the same pam- 
phlet has the following to say under 
the heading: "False or Misleading 
Advertisements" : 

"No advertisement shall contain any 
reference which is likely to lead the 
public to assume that the product ad- 
vertised, or an ingredient, has some 
special property or quality which is in 
fact unknown, unrecognized, or in- 
capable of being established." 

"Statistics, scientific terms, quota- 
tions from technical literature and the 
like must be used with a proper sense 
of responsibility to the ordinary view- 
er. The irrelevant use of data and jar- 
gon must never be resorted to to make 
claims appear more scientific than they 
really are. Statistics of limited valid- 



ity should not be presented in such a 
v/ay as to make it appear that they are 
universally true." 

The ITA is also responsible for see- 
ing that the contractors exercise no 
discrimination in the placing of spots. 
This is a difficult point for American 
advertisers to understand. Technical- 
ly speaking, one can buy only time seg- 
ments, not specific time slots. The rate 
card of ARD, one of the two London 
contractors, lists three time segments. 
These are as follows: 

Basic or "A" time ... 3 to 6 p.m. 

10 to 11 p.m. 

Peak or "A A" time 8 to 10 p.m. 

Off or "B" time 10:30 a.m. to 

3 p.m. 
Aside from specifying in which seg- 
ment he wishes his advertisement to 
appear and the day of the week, the 
advertiser has no say in theory as to 
the actual timing of the commercial. 
However, the word "discrimination" is 
very important to keep in mind here. 
If there is a symphony concert broad- 
cast weekly and you are selling hi-fi 
equipment and no one else wants to be 
adjacent to that program, there is no 
discrimination being practiced if you 
are given that same time week after 
week. But if other advertisers also 
want this time, then commercials are 
rotated to give everyone an equal 
chance. Again though, if you are sell- 
ing hi-fi equipment, the contractors will 
always place you, in so far as possible, 
next to a program attracting the kind 
of listeners you want to reach. That is 
to say, if you request it, there is little 
chance that your message would be 
placed in between rounds of a boxing 
match. 

In actual practice pressure can be 
applied to secure a favorable time. 
The amount of pressure that may be 
applied, of course, depends on the time 
being requested and the number of 
other advertisers asking for it. It is 
well to remember here that the ITA 
not only monitors all programs, but 
were an advertiser to complain that 
he had been discriminated against and 
this charge were substantiated, the 
contractor involved might be likely to 
lose his license. Most items advertised, 
though, are mass consumer items and 
since the competing BBC juggles its 
schedule frequently no one is ever 
quite able to pin down to the minute 
the best time within a given segment. 
It's just not like American timebuying 
with its close study of probabilities 
based on fairly fixed schedules. 



90 



SPONSOR 




Looking for coverage? ... 

look to wfmy-tv! 

Keep your prospects well covered in the Prosperous Piedmont 
section of North Carolina and Virginia with WFMY-TV. 

Since 1949, WFMY-TV has been the key salesman to this top TV 
market where some 2 million potential customers live, work and buy! 
WFMY-TV's 100,000 watt coverage of this $2.3 billion— 46 county- 
market means greater sales and profits for you. 

Call your H-R-P man today for the full story of WFMY-TV . . . 
basic CBS for the entire Prosperous Piedmont. 



firiy- 





Now In Our 
Sixth Year 



GREENSBORO, N. C. 

Represented by 

Harrington, Righter & Parsons, Inc 

New Yorlc — Chicago — San Francisco 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



91 



Speaking of commercials, it might 
be well here to comment on my general 
impression of them. When commercial 
tv first went on the air, there was a 
tendency to "under-sell" everything, 
for fear of being objectionable. This 
trend seems to be definitely on the de- 
cline and more and more sponsors are 
moving towards the "direct sell" ap- 
proach. Where earlier it was consid- 
ered bad taste to mention the prod- 
uct's name more than twice in any 
commercial, it is now common prac- 
tice to put it in enough to make sure 
no one forgets it. 

Incidentally, ITA contractors prac- 
tice double, triple, and even quadruple 
spotting between programs as well as 
within them so commercials must be 
good to get attention. For example, 
at 9 p.m. one Sunday evening recently 
a 60-second commercial for Cadbury's 
Chocolate Biscuits was run immedi- 
ately followed by a 10-second West- 
clox commercial, a 60-second Aspro 
commercial, and a 15-second Church- 
man's Cigarette commercial. 

Eric Boden, head of Schwerin Re- 
search in England, told me of an inter- 
esting discovery they had made in their 
British impact research. This is in re- 



^ IT S 



TRUE 



IN TULSA ^ 



It's True that 7 plus 
11 plus 43 . . . equals 
TWO! Tulsa is 7th in 
the nation in per capita 
income,* 11th fastest 
growing city in Amer- 
ica,* and No. 43 in the 
nation's TV markets** 
.... larger than Miami, 
Denver or Oklahoma 
City! And this oil-rich, 
cattle-rich market is 
covered by Channel 
2! ! ! ! 

*Sales Management Survey of Buying Power 
**CBS report to FCC, Dec. 1955 

There's a SPOT for You 
on Channel .... 



WSft 



TWA 

BASIC NBC • Represented by BLAIR 



gard to the 15-second commercial. 
Their tests in England show remark- 
able success with these 15-second com- 
mercials. Mr. Boden had no explana- 
tion of this phenomenon, but my own 
feeling is that the British audience, 
being unaccustomed to commercial 
broadcasts of any kind, are at this 
point highly susceptible. For when 
U.S. commercial television went on the 
air, sponsors were getting fantastic re- 
sults during the first couple of months. 
The same thing seems to be happen- 
ing in England today. The only docu- 
mented success story I was able to dig 
up concerns Revlon. Three days after 
commercial tv first went on the air, 
Revlon started a spot campaign, utiliz- 
ing both contractors. Two-thirds of 
the budget was put in weekend tele- 
vision (Associated Television Limited), 
the other one-third in weekday spots 
(Associated Rediffusion Limited). The 
campaign was for their new hair spray 
"Satin Set" and commercial tv was the 
only medium used. The results? Sales 
all over the London ITA area started 
to rocket. One store set a target 40% 
above their normal sales. They actu- 
ally sold 140% over normal. Some 
stores doubled their sales; many stores 
sold right out. 

Hotv to use tv: Having decided to use 
English tv, the next question is how. 
One of the answers seems to lie in re- 
search and testing of the kind done by 
Schwerin. In selecting and balancing 
their test audiences, Schwerin uses the 
following system to describe social 
classes in England. Their test audi- 
ences are matched to the total popula- 
tion social structure which they set up 
in this manner: 

1. AB Class (12% of total popula- 
tion). This class includes broadly all 
the professional groups. Managing 
directors, managers, owners of fac- 
tories, proprietors of large scale enter- 
prise and agents brokers and factors 
if their income is £1,250 per annum or 
over. Teachers are included in this 
group if they are teaching in an educa- 
tional establishment above primary 
school level. 

2. C Class (17% of total popula- 
tion). This class is that generally de- 
scribed loosely as the class of the 
"white collar workers." Except where 
breeders, farmers and agriculturists on 
their own account fall into Class AB, 
all other forms of farm managers and 
breeders fall into Class C and are in- 
cluded with farm bailiffs and foremen. 



Railway officials fall into this group, 
as do car and coach hire managers, 
garage managers, and stevedores. 

3. DE Class (71% of total popula- 
tion). This class includes all highly 
skilled manual workers and shop as- 
sistants, bus drivers, taxi drivers, lorry 
drivers, unskilled manual workers and 
shop assistants. 

Remember, that because of the ro- 
tation system, one day your commer- 
cial may be next to a symphony con- 
cert and the next week to a boxing 
match. The solution is to have several 
different commercials available and 
test them all to find out which social 
class they appeal to. If you are noti- 
fied that your commercial for the week 
of 12 February will be placed next to 
a symphony program, then you pick 
the commercial in which you believe 
or tests show appeals most to the AB 
class. If, in your series of commer- 
cials, you have another one that seems 
to appeal to the DE class, you insert 
that one in the spot next to the boxing 
match program. 

Many U.S. advertisers want to know 
if it is possible to use their U. S. com- 
mercials in England. The answer is 
that it is not only possible but, if it is 
a good commercial, I would say it is 
advisable. The one qualification I 
would put on this, however, is that it 
would be in good taste to re-record the 
sound track to get a voice with a Brit- 
ish accent. 

The Schwerin people told me that 
"everything we have found here con- 
firms what we have found in the States 
— commercials which we found to have 
great impact in the United States test 
sessions, have equally great impact 
here." They pointed out that, because 
they have used the same control pro- 
gram in their test sessions in England 
and America, they have been able to 
test the similarity and likes and dis- 
likes between Britain and America. 
The results show that there is more 



st in Power 
and Coverage 

1,000,000 

WATTS 



^Wilkes-Barre 
Scranton 

Call Avery-Knodel, Inc. 












I'll 



M 

> 






92 



SPONSOR 



(similarity in these likes and dislikes 
(between Britain and the United States 
than there is between the United States 
land Canada. 

This is extremely important because 
the implication is clear that successful 
commercials in the United States will 
be successful commercials in England. 
And conversely, what is good there will 
also be good here. As long as produc- 
tion costs are lower in England than 
in the States it is practical for U.S. 
sponsors to prepare their material in 
England once the English become ful- 
ly acquainted with the technique be- 
hind successful commercials. Adver- 
tisers who are preparing separate ma- 
terial for each market should consider 
the possibility of consolidating their 
production efforts for it would appear 
that in the case of tv, and within 
imitations, the same basic material 
?an be used for both markets. The 
Dnly specific examples that occur to 
me at the moment of this being done 
Is Max Factor who I understand is 
ising their U.S. commercials in Britain 
ind Sterling Drug which is using com- 
nercials here that were prepared in 
England. 

Ratings research: The American 
idvertiser used to having ratings with 
which to evaluate programing can find 
plenty of guidance in England. Tele- 
julse and Nielsen each provide rating 
reports similar to their U.S. reports. 
\ British service, Tamratings, is ac- 
ive as well. (Tamratings uses a meter 
system as does Nielsen, of course, and 
Pulse uses its personal interview meth- 
pd.) 

While ratings of individual shows 
tend to differ between the three rating 
services as will happen when methods 
bffer, the rating services all show: (1) 
That ITA programs in homes con- 
/erted to receive the ITA channel have 
nuch higher ratings in general than 
BBC shows; (2) That ITA programs 
lave much higher rating levels than 
U.S. shows attain here. 

Expansion: The ITA has mapped out 
an impressive expansion program for 
tself. This month ITA plans to open 
i second transmitter in Birmingham 
o reach the Midlands. It is estimated 
hat by the time this station opens, 
550,000 sets will be capable of receiv- 
ng tv in the Midlands area and this 
mmber should increase by 20,000 a 
nonth for the next six months. The 
550,000 sets represent a potential audi- 



ence of 1,000,000 viewers. In late 
April of this year, another transmitter 
is due to go into operation in Man- 
chester and this will reach an addi- 
tional 800,000 potential listeners in 
the Lancashire area, when all the sets 
have been converted. The end of this 
year should mark the opening of a 
Yorkshire station which will bring in 
600,000 more sets. Wales and Scotland 
are due to open up in the spring of 
1957. 

As to the program directors who will 
be handling these additional stations, 
it is set up this way. At the present 
moment Associated-Rediffusion Ltd. 
handles Monday to Friday programing 
in London and Associated Television 
Ltd. handles weekend programing. As- 
sociated Television Ltd. will be re- 
sponsible for Monday to Friday pro- 
graming in Manchester and a third 
contractor, Associated Broadcasting 
Co. will be given the weekend pro- 
graming in Yorkshire and Lancashire; 
Associated Broadcasting Co. will also 



". . . we at NBC consider the grand 
design of television, the creation of an 
all-people elite. We believe that we are 
shaping a society which acknowledges 
that no true prosperity, no enduring 
culture can stand on a bedrock of hu- 
man misery or of race or class or group 
subjection. We believe that it is impos- 
sible for a society to consider itself ma- 
ture and intelligent and humane so long 
as any normal person in it has been 
denied exposure to the great ideas, the 
great achievements, the great history of 
man. This is the opportunity and the 
destiny of commercial television." 

SYLVESTER WEAVER 
President of NBC 

• ••••••• 



be given the weekend programing, 
and a fourth contractor, Granada Tv, 
will be put in charge of week days. No 
contractors have yet been named in 
Wales and Scotland. 

British commercial tv has certainly 
come a long way, but they still have a 
long way to go. My own opinion is 
one of guarded optimism. Potentially, 
this can be the most important adver- 
tising medium in Britain today, but it 
is still too early to judge its present 
value. Now would seem to be a good 
time for those of us in the U.S. inter- 
ested in using British tv to get our 
feet wet, but it would be prudent to do 
further research into the temperature 
of the water. * * * 



IN EVANSVILLE INDIANA 
WISE 
BUYERS 
CHOOSE 




Now Available — 

PARTICIPATIONS in the 

HOOSIER JAMBOREE 

5:00 to 6:00 P.M. 

Monday thru Friday 

"Live Western Music Show" 

with PROVEN SALES RESULTS 

ASK 

MEEKER TV, INC. —ADAM YOUNG 
St. Louis 




NOW OPERATING 
WEOA— CBS RADIO 




EL PASO 

among top 30 
in Rate 
of growth* 



5th City in Size in America's 
Biggest State . . . and growing 
faster and sounder all the time. 

• 16th in Effective Buying Income 
Growth in U.S.A. 

• 22nd in Total Retail Sales 
Growth in U.S.A. 

• 19th in Food Sales Growth in 
U.S.A. 

ONLY KROD-TV effectively covers 

all of El Paso's market. 

•Sales Management Survey of Buying Power. 
Nov. 1(), 1955 



KROD-TV 

CHANNEL 4 

EL PASO texas 

CBS - ABC 



AFFILIATED with KROD-600 kc I5000w), 
Owned 6 Operated by El Paso Times, Inc 



Rep. Nationally by the BRANHAM COMPANY 




5 FEBRUARY 1956 



93 



NEW YORK 

(Continued from page 29) 

B. Similarity to existing ABC pro- 
grams. 

C. Similarity to existing programs 
en other networks. 

D. Frequency of presentation (across 
the board, once a week, once a month, 
tne-time special). 

E. Ideal length (regardless of length 
suggested by producer who submitted 
idea). 

F. Ease of production. (Can one 
writer handle the entire series or will 
it necessitate a constant search for new 
writers?) 

Can it be produced through the pro- 
ducer's facilities, ABC's facilities, or 
will it entail far-flung locations, diffi- 
cult technical problems? If the show 
is to be daily or weekly, is the pro- 
ducer likely to be able to stick to the 
production schedule? 

G. Cast. (Is the cast, if any. sug- 
gested by the producer, right for the 
program? Should a name star be 
sought? Is it necessary to arrange for 
guest stars for each individual pro- 
gram?) 

H. Cost. (Is the producer's budget, 



fuck (Unfene/- 

Sw«Mto,Tw. 




KRARTVl 

SWEETWATER-ABILENE, TEXAS 

'tjjJl f4e«JToa(fieo4uAfijA6j*v4 

OWNED & OPERATED BY TEXAS TELECASTING, INC. 
7400 COLLEGE, LUBBOCK, TFXAS 



NATIONAL REPRESENTATIVE: THE BRANHAM COMPANY 



if submitted along with the idea, likely 
to be correct. Should more or less 
spending be suggested? Is this" a 
potential money maker, a prestige pro- 
gram? Which should it be?) 

I. Exploitation. (What angles can 
be worked through publicity and other 
means to get the most out of the idea. 
Can this be pitched at potential spon- 
sors in the idea stage, or should it 
wait for the completed pilot film? 
Would advance publicity help or hurt 
the project?) 

J. Sponsorship. (Is this the kind 
of program for which it will be easy 
to find sponsors. Are there any con- 
troversial aspects? Are sponsors who 
would be likely to buy this program the 
kind who won't consider ABC's na- 
tional distribution difficulties in the one- 
and two-station markets a hindrance? ) 

At this point the sales department is 
likely to be brought in for consultation. 

Having reached a preliminary con- 
clusion on these and related issues, the 
board either accepts the idea or rejects 
it. If accepted it is sent to the busi- 
ness affairs and legal departments to 
check on rights and possible infringe- 
ments and to work out a preliminary 
deal with the producer. 

This deal will usually stipulate that 
the producer develop a show-concept 
and first script along the lines recom- 
mended by the board. Upon approval 
of this concept and script by ABC, 
the network will 100% finance the 
production of a pilot film (and later 
the entire series) and ABC and the 
producer will share 50-50 in the profits. 
In return for this arrangement, ABC 
gets an exclusive 12-month option 
( from the date of completion of the 
pilot film I after which if ABC decides 
to drop the idea, all rights revert to 
the producer. 

After a deal has been worked out, 
the sales and publicity departments 
are informed of the impending pro- 
gram and start work on pre-release 
publicity and sales presentations. 

At the same time the producer with 
his own writers and staff works out the 
first script, which is then returned to 
ABC. 

Here Weitman and Lewine pass on 
it, and either recommend changes or 
pass it on to Kintner and Mitchell for 
final okay. 

Following approval the production 
money is allocated and turned over to 
the producer who now proceeds to 
complete the pilot film. 



CBS: While there are many parallel 
steps at CBS, the procedure is quite 
different. CBS believes that a network 
program should be produced and 
supervised by CBS personnel, regard- 
less of where the original idea came 
from. The network, therefore, has set 
up a system in which executive pro- 
ducers each handle certain program 
categories. The producers report 
directly to Harry Ommerle, v. p. in 
charge of network programing, New 
\ork, who is charged with program 
cor-ordination. and in turn to Hubbell 
Robinson, v.p. in charge of over-all 
network programing. A similar set-up 
exists on the West Coast where Al 
Scalpone is v.p. in charge of network 
programing, Hollywood, and also re- 
ports to Robinson in New York. 

The individual executive producers 
and their fields are: 

Gil Ralston, drama 

Richard Lewine (brother of ABC's, 
Robert ) musicals and specials 

Mario Lewis, comedy and musical 
comedy 

Lester Gottlieb, director in charge 
of daytime programing 

CBS considers program ideas from 
all possible sources whether conceived 
and presented by an individual or an 
established company. In the case of 
the latter, it will go to great lengths to 
gain some kind of managerial or con- 
tractual control of the independent 
company along with buying its pro- 
gram. 

A program idea presented to CBS 
by an individual (writer, producer, 
talent staff member, others) will first 
be classified as to program type and 
will then be presented to the right ex- 
ecutive producer. The producer will 
immediately reject or recommend the 
idea to Harry Ommerle ( in New York) 
or to Al Scalpone (in Hollywood) with 
whose recommendations it then goes 
to Hubbell Robinson for a decision. 
( Robinson in some cases may at this 
point consult the sales department to 
determine the potential from a spon- 
sorship point of view". I 

The various points of consideration 
are much in line with those of ABC. 



[■^ 



IDEA! 

Former police civil service commissioner, writer and 
lecturer on police civil service laws has excellent 
idea for television series of interest to juveniles. 
Sufficient factual source material available for 39, 
52 or more episodes. Excellent merchandising possi- 
bilities suitable for network, regional or local 
sponsorship for any product or service. Available for 
technical advice and supervision. Format sent on 
request to interested principals. 

BERGMANN ENTERPRISES 

215 N. Flores San Antonio, Texas 



94 



SPONSOR 



But in CBS's case, ease of production 
will be considered in the light of net- 
work production facilities, rather than 
the independent's ability to deliver the 
finished program. 

After a program is recommended 
and accepted by Robinson, it goes 
back to the executive producer. He 
now calls on the services of the legal 
department (for clearances and con- 
tracts) and the finance department for 
allocation of enough funds to see the 
project through to the TVR (Tele- 
vision Recording, CBS term for kine- 
scope or audition film). 

If the originator of the idea is a 
producer, he will most likely ( but not 
necessarily) be hired by the CBS ex- 
ecutive producers to produce the TVR. 
If he is a writer or director, a deal 
will usually be made to use his services 
and a producer will be assigned to the 
proj ect. 

While Robinson keeps an interested 
eye on these in-progress productions, 
and is actively involved in all major 
decisions, such as the hiring of writers, 
stars, the responsibility of seeing the 
production through to a successful 
completion, rests from here on with 
the executive producer. He is author- 
ized (within the allocated budget) to 
hire anyone or anything on the produc- 
tion level whether from within or out- 
side CBS. He is not asked to account 
for the spending of the production 
money step by step except for book- 
keeping and record purposes. 

After some weeks or even months, 
he will arrange for a screening of the 
new TVR for Robinson who will de- 
cide whether the entire project should 
be discarded, reworked or improved 
(with additional expenditures) or 
whether to present it to the program 
board which consists of the top net- 
work brass, usually including William 
Paley. 

After this the new program is turned 
over to the sales department to find 
a sponsor or group of sponsors and 
tentative decisions are made as to 
where and when to fit the newcomer 
into the existing program schedule. 

With its system of executive pro- 
ducers, each supervising numbers of 
producers who are in charge of the 
individual programs, CBS operates 
much like Universal-International Stu- 
dios in Hollywood. The largest possible 
amount of authority is delegated to the 
men in close contact with the actual 
project and executive supervision is 
reduced to a minimum. 



\BC: Executive supervision enters into 
practically every stage of program de- 
velopment at NBC (similar to Zanuck's 
20th-century Fox). Pat Weaver, as 
chairman of the board, freed from the 
administrative duties of the presidency, 
continues to make his dynamic ap- 
proach toward network programing 
felt. Tom McAvity, v.p. in charge of 
the tv network, as Weavers representa- 
tive, is personally concerned with each 
project and every phase of program 
development. 

NBC will consider program ideas 
from every possible source, will spend 
money for development of promising 
ideas, and will consider deals involving 
complete network control as well as 
those demanding a 100' '< hands-off 
policy. 

• ••••••• 

". . . the film producer is a creative 
extension of the agency rather than a 
separate entity. He considers the agen- 
cy's problems as automatically as he 
considers his own, and the reverse is 
true. Certainly, problems exist, and 
they always will, because we are in- 
volved in a creative group effort and the 
results of that effort must ultimately 
be placed on a strip of film — a highly 
technical procedure." 

ROBERT H. KLAEGER 
V.P. in charge of TV film commercials 

Transfilm 

• ••••••• 

Here is what happens: 

An idea brought to NBC will first 
be considered by Dick Pinkham (v.p. 
in charge of network programing) or 
Sam Fuller director of special pro- 
graming and their staffs. If recom- 
mended, it will go to Tom McAvity 
(and in cases of extreme importance 
to Weaver). If accepted, the legal 
department checks for rights and pos- 
sible infringements and McAvity will 
ask for a budget. (If the idea origi- 
nates with an independent producer, 
he will prepare his own budget to be 
couble-checked by NBC's budget de- 
partment. If it's to be a program pro- 
duced 100% through NBC facilities, 
NBC makes up its own budget.) 

Now, money is allocated for de- 
velopment, and sometimes with and 
sometimes without the help of NBC 
the producer will hire writers to pre- 
pare a first script. This script goes 
back to McAvity's office and then back 
to the producer (time and again) until 
a satisfactory one has been produced. 
NBC pays these writing and develop- 
ment costs, and many times a pro- 
gram may cost thousands before it 
lands in the wastepaper basket as a 



good idea which for some reason 
couldn't be developed. 

When a script has finally been ac- 
cepted for production, continuity ac- 
ceptance gets a copy and the legal 
department works out a final deal 
with the producer. These deals very 
from complete integration of the pro- 
ducer into the NBC network, to part- 
nership deals (a la ABC) or independ- 
ent production for NBC, with the 
network having practically no rights 
of supervision or interference at all. 

The pilot film or kinescope now goes 
into production through either NBC 
facilities or the producer's own organi- 
zation and when completed is screened 
for McAvity and/or Weaver for final 
okay before going to the sales depart- 
ment for presentation to clients. 

Network thinking: Experience has 
shown that working with the intangi- 
bles of show business and the temper- 
ament usually inherent in talent 
demands flexibility. Therefore the 
above practices are adhered to as often 
as they are ignored, and there are 
varying individual case histories with 
each new program. * * * 



the 
summit 



Another 
top Radio in- 
dependent — KFMJ, 
in Tulsa, Oklahoma, 
takes top audience in 
the market's 7-day aver- 
age. See Nov.-Dec. Hooper. 
Call John E. Pearson Com- 
pany (JEPCO) in New York. 
Dial LU 5-5555 in Tulsa. 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



95 



NIELSEN 

(Continued from page 39) 

is total listening in the area measured, 
including listening to stations coming 
in from outside the NSI 21-county 
area. The other is listening to local 
stations. Total listening came to 321,- 
200 homes or a 27% sets-in-use figure. 
Local station listening came to 261,700 
homes or a sets-in-use figure of 22%. 

The above figures cover home listen- 
ing. There is, in addition, what is 
called an Auto-Plus figure. This is the 
per cent of auto listening to in-home 
listening. In the segment covered, the 
auto sets-in-use figure was 15.2%. 
This is not 15.2% of all homes but 
15.2% of the total listening figure. 
Thus, 45,000 "homes" were listening 
to auto radios at that time. They are 
not necessarily all additional listening 
homes, since a family can, of course, 
record listening both at home and in 
the auto at the same time. The amount 
of overlap is not shown in the NSI 
reports, however, nor can Nielsen 
break out the overlap in a special tab- 
ulation. 

Like the sets-in-use figures, per- 
broadcast data is shown two ways. 
Total audience for the John Harvey 




COVER 

WONDERFUL WYOMING 

Western Nebraska 
Northern Colorado 

KVWO 

Wyoming's Top Hooper 
Station 

JOS. HERSHEY McGILLVRA 

New York • Chicago • Atlanta 

Los Angeles • San Francisco 

Write, Wire, Phone William T. Kemp 

Box 926 • 2-6433 

Cheyenne, Wyoming 



seqment (20,800 homes in this case) 
covers listening to the station outside 
the NSI area as well as inside. For the 
NSI area itself, the homes-reached fig- 
ure was 14,100, indicating that the 
station has substantial listening out- 
side the 21-county area. 

In addition there is a third program 
figure that timebuyers can use. This 
is listening within the inner metropoli- 
tan area, which covers five counties. 
Metropolitan listening is not broken 
down into 15-minute segments, as in 
the regular reports, but by six-hour 
periods. That is, for each station there 
is a figure showing the proportion of 
the NSI area audience within the met- 
ropolitan area during the morning, af- 
ternoon and evening. A glance at this 
shows that the metropolitan area audi- 
ence to KGO during the morning is 
about three-quarters of the NSI area 
audience. 

Per-broadcast data also includes a 
share-of-audience figure. This share 
figure covers listening to local stations 
but not outside stations, though the 
share of total listening can be calcu- 
lated without much trouble. There is no 
breakdown of Auto-Plus figures by 
stations. 

The NSI report also showed that 
(1) the total four-week cumulative 
audience was 152,900 unduplicated 
homes, (2) the four-week cumulative 
NSI area audience was 101,700 differ- 
ent homes, (3) the average home lis- 
tening to the show heard it 2.8 times 
during the four weeks, (4) the average 
home listening to the show had two 
listeners, (5) audience composition 
was 20% men, 40% women, 17% 
teen-agers, 23% children under 13. 

So much for the material shown in 
the report. Out of this, however, time- 
buyers and researchers can and do get 
additional data. For example: 

• The number of different listeners 
(two per home) to the show in four 
weeks was 305,800. 

• The number of program impres- 
sions in four weeks (the number of 
different listeners multiplied by 2.8) 
was 856,200. 

o The number of commercial impres- 
sions (assuming three commercials) 
in four weeks was 2,568,000. 

• The number of different men 
reached in four weeks was 61,200, the 
number of different women 122,400. 

On top of this the researcher can 
calculate a host of cost-per-1,000 fig- 
ures. On a four-week basis, this in- 
cludes cost-per-1,000 homes, listeners, 



commercial impressions, men, women. 
etc. And these figures can be com- 
pared with other buys or potential 
buys. The whole business can be run 
off for a tv show, too, of course. Note 
that in all this, there was no mention 
of a program percentage rating. This 
is no accident. Of the 25 markets now 
covered by NSI, none of the radio re- 
ports show program ratings and only 
five tv reports show program ratings. 
Ratings can be calculated from mate- 
rial shown in the report, however. 

(Incidentally, the program rating for 
the Paul Harvey show was 1.2.) 

There are a couple of reasons for 
the Nielsen policy of not printing rat- 
ings in the report. In the first place, 
say the Nielsen people, the importance 
of ratings can be over-estimated. 
What the advertiser is interested in is 
the number of homes he reaches. 

This is especially true for radio, 
where advertisers commonly buy an- 
nouncements via the saturation meth- 
od. A rating for one announcement is 
not nearly as useful as the total audi- 
ence picture. 

In the second place, though it is sel- 
dom bruited about publicly, radio sta- 
tions do not like to sell with program 
percentage figures since they sound 
small in relation to tv and radio's for- 
mer rating history. 

But the shift from ratings is evident 
in tv, too, as advertisers and their 
agencies delve deeper into audience 
facts. Take a recent special tab done 
for Chesterfield by ARB. The adver- 
tiser uses three network shows — Drag- 
net, Warner Bros. Presents and Gun- 
smoke — and wanted to find out the ex- 
tent of audience duplication among the 
trio. The facts below come from the 





•C5>, 


/#Vv 






it 11 


J£$^8P 


j^r 


MHfcCF »V?S2 " 






' J^*S<^^A\^ 


J^t»tvjt? 










Vp A i I 


l\ IjB'l 


V2 vJ/zl/llffii 




-£ ^>. Y 






"^J/f 


"/^O^Jft 




Ah~" L --- J «*rSk 


^■i&y^ 






_. 


-> ^- 



"Come on, be a sport — KRIZ 
Phoenix is broadcasting the 
Charleston." 



96 



SPONSOR 



ARB October 1955 national tv report, 
covering the first week of that month. 
To start off, ARB showed that total 
homes reached by each show was as 
follows: Dragnet, on NBC, 9,440,000; 
Warner Bros. Presents, on ABC, 4,- 
670,000; Gunsmoke, on CBS, 5,840,- 

ooo! 

However, the number of homes 
which watched Dragnet but didn't 
watch the other two was 6,800,000. 
The comparable figure for Warner 
Bros, presents was 2,580,000 and for 
Gunsmoke it was 3,360,000. 

ARB also supplied similar figures 
for all possible combinations of the 
three shows. The number of homes 
viewing any two of the three but not a 
third ranged from 790,000 to 1,340,- 
000. And the number of homes view- 
ing all three came to 350,000. 

Thus the client was successful in 
spreading around his sales message 
since the figures indicate a relatively 
small degree of duplication. If duplica- 
tion was complete, the number of dif- 
ferent homes reached by the three 
shows would have been equal to the 
figure for the highest-rated show, 
Dragnet, or 9,440,000. Actually the 
number of different homes reached for 
the three shows came to 16,170,000. 
If there were no duplication at all, 
the different homes figure would have 
been a shade under 20 million. 

\SI use: In the shift away from 
ratings, the emphasis on other data 
differs, naturally. To find out what 
information agencies and advertisers 
are using most in the relatively new 
NSI and what they like and don't like 
about it, sponsor spoke to a number 
of admen (and women) in research, 
media and timebuying. 

SPONSOR found NSI users a little 
overwhelmed at first by the complexi- 
ties and mass of detail in the reports. 
It has taken them a few months to 
read and use the information com- 
fortably. 

However, there was one bit of in- 
formation that was found particular- 
ly convenient to use. That was the to- 
tal homes figure. As explained previ- 
ously per-broadcast and four-week 
audiences include homes listening out- 
side the NSI area, which is usually a 
pretty large area in the first place. 

The reason this information was 
liked so well was that it eliminated a 
good many calculations. Where ad- 
vertisers get audience figures for just 
the metropolitan area or a few addi- 



tional counties around it, the time- 
buyer must calculate what the audi- 
ence is beyond the coverage zone of 
the rating service. To assume the rat- 
ing is the same beyond this zone as in 
it is dangerous since the outer area, 
often being small-town or rural con- 
tains population with different pro- 
gram tastes than the urban metropoli- 
tan audience. The outer area also has 
different station competition. For 
years, timebuyers have been forced to 
use only the inner area rating. In 
some cases, this became more compli- 
cated as the rating was assumed to ap- 
ply only to those outside areas where 
the station in question had a regular 
audience of say, 50% or more, accord- 
ing to whatever coverage service the 
agency used. 

• ••••••• 
*'I would set my sights for color TV 
set sales — just as I would direct my 
color television advertising — on the 
greatly increasing numbers of families 
who are earning $7,500 per year after 
taxes. . . . And if we — and our individ- 
ual stores or companies — are to get our 
share of this market, we must provide 
the 'extra something' needed to clinch 
these sales — whether it be higher qual- 
ity or lower prices — or the impact of a 
color television commercial." 

ROBERT A. SEIDEL 
Executive V.P., Consumer Products 

R.C.A. 

• ••••••• 

Audiences outside the NSI areas can 
\ arv considerably among stations, de- 
pending on both station power, the 
general popularity of the station and 
the specific kind of programing in- 
volved. A farm show, obviously, will 
have substantial listening outside the 
NSI area. 

Outside listening can be substantial. 
Take Chicago, for example. The NSI 
area for radio consists of 47 counties 
in four states. The total area includes 
roughly twice that area. On WGN, the 
Bill Evans Show reached 426,000 
homes in four weeks in the NSI area 
and 683,000 homes in the total area. 
On WIND, Chicago Top Tunes got 
625,000 homes in the NSI area in 
four weeks and 790,000 homes in the 
total area. 

Outside listening is not always of in- 
terest to the timebuyer. Where the 
station has low power or where the 
client is not interested in reaching 
people beyond the NSI or metro 
areas, then total listening figures are 
academic. 

Cume audience figures were found to 
be useful to agency timebuyers, espe- 
cially for radio. It is not only the total 
four-week figures themselves but the 



way they build up that interests users 
of NSI. 

Since these figures cover undupli- 
cated homes, they can show if a pro- 
gram is reaching a large number of 
homes thinly or hitting the same homes 
over and over. In determining this, the 
timebuyer or researcher can refer to a 
figure in NSI reports showing the 
number of times the program is seen 
or heard over the four-week period. 
A glance at any radio or tv (but espe- 
cially radio) report will show that this 
figure can range from a little over one 
to as high as about 10. The higher 
figures are found in strip shows, since 
a weekly show obviously cannot pro- 
duce a figure greater than four. 

Whether the advertiser wants broad 
home coverage or continuing impact 
depends, naturally, on the product or 
the idea behind the campaign. Jerry 
Gibson, chief timebuyer at DCSS, 
pointed out that Pharmaco at present 
is interested in reaching the same 
home frequently for Feen-a-mint while 
Bristol-Myers wants to reach a lot of 
different homes for Vitalis. 

Not everyone is interested in cumes. 
Per-broadcast figures still hold a strong 
attraction for agencies. And in some 
cases, agencies find the cume figures 



the 
summit 



Another 
top Radio in- 
dependent — KFMJ, 
in Tulsa, Oklahoma, 
takes top audience in 
the market's 7-day aver- 
age. See Nov.-Dec. Hooper. 
Call John E. Pearson Com- 
pany (JEPCO) in New York. 
Dial LU 5-5555 in Tulsa. 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



97 



cannot be used even where they want 
to use them. This is because of the 
way per-broadcast and cume audiences 
are calculated. To explain: 

Each NSI report covers an enght- 
week period. Both per-broadcast and 
cume audiences are averages of the 
eight weeks for the time period con- 
cerned. The show listed for the 
time period is that running during the 
seventh week of the period covered by 
the report. If an advertiser sponsors 
an alternate week show or is interested 
in a show that was put on a station's 
schedule during the middle of the re- 
port period, he cannot accurately 
determine either the cume or per- 
broadcast audience for the show from 
the report. In some cases, a special 
tabulation can be made if the program 
had been on a sufficient number of 
times during the eight-week period. 
But when a one-shot, like a sports 
event, is put on, the Nielsen sample is 
too small to measure it accurately. 

On the other hand, admen say, the 
eight-week average gives a good run- 
ning picture of a show undisturbed by 
meaningless fluctuations or efforts by 
stations or networks to throw in a 
hot program during a "rating week." 




In using Auto-Plus data agencies 
have to live with the fact that it is not 
broken down by stations. The adver- 
tiser can be told how many autos are 
using their radios during a specific 
quarter hour when his commercial is 
running but he does not know what 
per cent share of this auto sets-in-use 
figure is listening to his commercial. 

Some agencies take the in-home 
share of audience for a show and 
assume that the share of the auto audi- 
ence is the same. They admit they 
don't like to do it and that they are 
only guessing but they add they have 
no other way of telling a client who is 
interested in the auto audience how 
many auto sets he is reaching. Other 
agencies prefer not to use the Auto- 
Plus figures rather than guesstimate. 

• ••••••• 
"In our minds to program for the in- 
tellectual alone is easy and duplicates 
other media. To make us al into intel- 
lectuals — there is the challenge for com- 
mercial television." 

SYLVESTER WEAVER 

President of NBC 

******** 

In some cases agencies take a rough 
guess and assume the share of auto 
sets-in-use will be less or more than 
the in-home share depending on the 
kind of program and time of day. 
These guessers assume, for example, 
that a soap opera will have a lower 
auto share than in-home share while 
a music show's auto share will be as 
high if not higher than the in-home 
share. Where an advertiser buys a 
saturation campaign and has commer- 
cials on, say, three out of four of 
the local stations at the same time he 
can assume his auto share of audience 
is pretty close to his in-home share. 

To show how dangerous it is to 
assume that the auto share of audience 
is the same as the in-home share take a 
look at a recent Pulse report. In the 
October 1955 report, a soap opera strip 
on one station recorded a 4.4 rating 
with an out-of-home rating of .2. A 
music strip at the same time showed a 
2.9 rating with a .9. Pulse's out-of- 
home figure includes other listening 
beside auto listening, which averages 
about 55% of all out-of-home listening, 
according to a Pulse study. However, 
it is still apparent that the music show 
got a bigger share of the auto audience 
than its in-home share, while the 
situation was reversed in the case of 
the soaper. 

The Auto-Plus figures are still im- 
portant, nevertheless. They show when 



auto listening is highest. They point 
up the differences in auto listening 
habits between markets. 

If an advertiser buys into a sports 
news program at a time when auto 
listening figures indicate that the males 
of the community are driving to or 
from work, he can be pretty sure his 
share of the auto audience is at least 
as high as the in-home share and is 
probably higher. 

Advertisers have to pay more atten- 
tion to auto listening these days for 
two reasons. First of all, with more 
cars on the road, the total amount of 
auto listening is increasing. Secondly, 
auto listening as a per cent of in-home 
listening has been increasing because 
of the long-range decline in in-home 
listening. 

Here are some examples of how high 
auto listening can go as a per cent of 
in-home listening. These figures are 
taken from NSI reports last spring 
and summer: 

• In the Seattle-Tacoma market, the 
figure for a Sunday evening quarter 
hour in June was 74.5%. 

• In Chicago, the figure during a 
July Saturday evening was 94%. 

• In Washington, the figure for a 
Sunday evening in July was 82.8%. 

• •• 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

{Continued from page 30) 

production set-ups producing 
shows for us. But we don't like 
to think of it as a matter of con- 
trol. Partnership would be a 
much better word with which to 
describe these arrangements. In 
a partnership responsibility 
rests equally heavily on the 
shoulders of both partners and 
that's how it is with us. Nat- 
urally, we would not pass up a 
bet, if the producer should in- 
sist on complete autonomy. In 
that case, all we do is insist on 
exclusivity. The Burns & Allen 
show is an example. We have 
no control over that program in 
any shape or form. All our 



100% NEGRO PROGRAMS 



WSOK 



IN NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE 



98 



SPONSOR 






contract calls for is exclusivity 
with CBS. 
NBC: We don't insist. But we prefer 
to have the right of control or 
at least supervision. It gives us 
a chance to protect the show 
and to protect ourselves as well 
as the sponsor. Ad agencies 
like us to have this control. It 
puts us in the middle, makes us 
the whipping-boy if things go 
wrong. And they know that 
we'll pour in all kinds of money 
to rejuvenate a slipping pro- 
gram. But if the idea, producer 
or star are strong enough, we 
may agree to a 100/^ hands-off 
deal. Take the case of a filmed 
half-hour situation comedy in- 
volving a big star, which was 
being produced for us in Holly- 
wood some seasons ago. The 
star insisted on complete au- 
tonomy and we agreed. The 
program started out all right, 
but it slipped. If we had been 
able to hire writers, suggest re- 
visions, we might have been 
able to save it. As it was, the 
star wouldn't let us do a thing 
and finally we had to drop it. 
Still, I'd make a deal with him 
tomorrow if he'd agree to ac- 
cept our help. With Jack Webb 
(Dragnet), on the other hand, 
I don't even know if we've got 
the right to interfere. It's never 
come up. The program runs 
smoothly and nobody from 
NBC ever gets near the studio. 

SPONSOR: Where do networks 
look for new program ideas? 
ABC: Were of course interested in 
good ideas wherever they come 
from. But in view of our spe- 
cific method of operation, we 
give preference to program 
ideas presented by established 
independent producers. These 
men have the facilities and 
know-how to see a program 
through to completion. In ad- 
dition, their suggestions are 
usually more carefully devel- 
oped and thoroughly thought 
through from all practical an- 
gles. But take one of our new 
series, Frontier Judge. It was 
presented to Mr. Kintner in 
Hollywood last year. We con- 
sidered it here in New York 
and found that we liked it. We 
then arranged with Jack Cher- 



tock, one of our independent 
Hollywood producers, to handle 
the filming. So here is a case 
where independent production 
facilities and know-how were 
tacked onto a good idea in or- 
der to make production practi- 
cal for us. 

CBS: Many new ideas originate right 
within the creative staff of the 
network. Others are brought to 
us from the outside. The orig- 
ination of an idea is not impor- 
tant, but competent profession- 
als, whether independent or 
CBS personnel, are a more 
promising source. It is extreme- 
ly rare when an idea presented 
by a complete outsider is worth 
serious consideration. 

NBC: Anywhere. A hit is a hit and 
we can't afford to be concerned 
with parentage. Sometimes 
three words scrawled on the 
edge of a newspaper, are worth 
more to us than 50 pages of 
carefully worked out manu- 
script. Even a spoken sugges- 
tion can be the germ that re- 
sults in a $350,000 spectacular. 

SPONSOR: Are ad agencies 

important sources of network 

program ideas? 

ABC: When an ad agency develops 
a program, it is usually because 
they have a sponsor for it. In 
that case they will either pro- 
duce it (or have it produced) 
themselves and then simply 
come to us for time, or they'll 
buy the time and the network 
producing facilities. 

CBS: We certainly welcome anything 
that an agency may conceive 
and create for its clients. But 
ad agencies just don't have the 
program development turn-over 
to warrant the necessary facili- 
ties. It takes a great deal of 
manpower, not to speak of 
money, to create and produce a 
program. If the agency and 
client decide to drop such a 
show, the agency will have to 
let these people go until such 
time as another program might 
need development. We, on the 
other hand, can utilize the tal- 
ent left stranded by a dying 
show in other program produc- 
tion and thus maintain the kind 
of program operation that is 
necessary. 



NBC: With program development 
costs what they are today, and 
with most important programs 
being handled on a split spon- 
sorship basis, ad agencies have 
neither the financial resources, 
the manpower nor the incentive 
to actively enter into program 
creation. On the other hand 
there are cases of active NBC 
co-operation in the creation of 
an agency package. The former 
Colgate Variety Hour was basi- 
cally an agency package, but 
much NBC effort has gone into 
the development of many of its 
programs. 

SPONSOR: Will networks tailor 
new programs to fit sponsor needs? 
ABC: Sponsors rarely know what 
they want until they see it. Ob- 
viously with the success of a 
program like Rin Tin Tin, 
there are other sponsors who 
would be willing to get into the 
act. But how many dogs can 
you have on one network (not 
intended as a pun ! ) ? We nat- 
urally consider over-all sponsor 
and audience trends, but in our 



the 
summit 



Another 
top Radio in- 
dependent — KFMJ, 
in Tulsa, Oklahoma, 
takes top audience in 
the market's 7-day aver- 
age. See Nov. -Dec. Hooper. 
Call John E. Pearson Com- 
pany (JEPCO) in New York. 
Dial LU 5-5555 in Tulsa. 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



99 



case, where most shows are on 
film, and are therefore shot 
months in advance of release, it 
would be impractical to spend 
large sums in order to create a 
show based on a specific spon- 
sor's needs. These may have 
changed by the time the pro- 
gram is ready. 

CBS: On extremely rare occasions we 
may create and build a program 
to fit the needs of a specific ad- 
vertiser. But for the most part 
we concentrate on creating the 
best entertainment, public af- 
fairs, documentary or other 
shows, and we do this with the 
knowledge based on past ex- 
perience that when you have a 
good program to offer there 
will always be advertisers will- 
ing to pick up the tab. The me- 
dium of tv has in itself such 
tremendous power that with 
quality production there can be 
no lack of takers. 

NBC: It happens, and when it does it 
usually is a question of copying 
a successful precedent. Take 
the Big Surprise. The success 
of the $64,000 Question created 
a demand among sponsors and 
we filled this demand (with a 
Louis G. Cowan, Inc. package.) 
Whether or not this was a smart 
move, is too early to tell. In 
the same way some time ago a 
few highly successful situation 
comedies brought on a flood of 
imitations inspired by great 
sponsor interest. Now they are 
dying like flies. Our own Drag- 
net created the same kind of 
imitative wave. As a network, 




"Someday I'll be a personality on 
KRIZ Phoenix — meanwhile I just 
work here for prestige." 



we prefer to come up with new 
shows, tailored to a variety of 
potential needs, but we're in 
business for profit. If sponsors 
cry loud enough for a specific 
type of program, we'll try to 
find it for them. 

SPONSOR: Will networks pay to 

develop a new program idea? 

ABC: We'll make a deal to finance a 
pilot film, based on script ap- 
proval. In other words, up to 
a completed and acceptable 
script, it's the producer's re- 
sponsibility. Once we accept 
the script, we'll foot all the bills. 

CBS: Once a program idea has been 
accepted, we pay all the costs 
through to the TVR. But we 
go much further than that: 
We actually pay to create new 
ideas or to give opportunities 
to new personalities. We pro- 
vide the proper working cli- 
mate for people, who we feel 
have a potential. Take the case 
of Nat Hiken. When we hired 
him, he had no idea to sell. 
But while on our payroll, he 
created the format for the Phil 
Silvers Show. A similar situa- 
tion existed with Jess Oppen- 
heimer. He had never thought 
of anything resembling / Love 
Lucy when we decided that here 
was a talent worthy of CBS rec- 
ognition. We hired him and 
he came up with the Lucy show. 
CBS has two separate pro- 
gram budgets: One for the pro- 
grams which the public is actu- 
ally going to see and one for 
experimentation and the devel- 
opment of programs and ideas 
which we hope they will see at 
some future date. In keeping 
with this CBS concept of devel- 
oping new talent for future use, 
we are right now considering 
hiring three new men for whom 
we have no specific place, but 
who we think will come through 
for us in the future. 

NBC: We will make a preliminary 
deal on just an idea or concept 
or often even only an ingredi- 
ent (possibly a star), if it ap- 
pears worthwhile. We then al- 
locate funds and offer all pos- 
sible assistance to develop the 
idea into a potentially success- 
ful format and the best possible 
first script. * * * 



ROBERT HALL 

[Continued from page 41 1 

slots, we're in, good and solid. 

"4. To cap it all, our own store 
managers, who've always been dedi- 
cated to newspaper advertising, now 
write us asking for more radio and 
television. It's easy to understand 
why. Most of our new stores are in 
the outlying areas, away from the 
center of the retail trading zones. Best 
way to reach those areas quickly and 
economically is by air." 

But again, Bess stresses, each of the 
130 Robert Hall markets is ap- 
proached individually, its problems 
analyzed and, with luck, solved by 
finding the right formula for that par- 
ticular market. 

For example, last year a Robert 
Hall store in New York State was be- 
hind in its sales for the same period 
the year before. In retailing you live 
and die by that yardstick. Whether 
you use plain pipe racks or red velvet 
carpets, survival depends on beating 
or at least meeting last year's figures. 

At the time, the store was using 
some minute announcements on radio 
plus weekly insertions in the local 
paper. Not heavy in either. And, con- 
sequently, neither was delivering much 
in the way of results. 

"We took all the dollars they were 
spending in both media," says Bess, 
"and switched them to tv — minutes 
and five-minute sportscasts at night. 
In three months the store not only- 
caught up with last year's figures but 
went ahead, and stayed there." 

By the same logic, when a station 
or a format or any copy approach 
proves itself a steady producer, Rob- 
ert Hall sticks with it till it stops pay- 
ing off. Take WNEW, N. Y. The firm 
has been on the station with the same 
coverage — 24 10- to 15-minute music 
programs and 27 minute announce- 
ments a week — for the past eight 
years. WIND and WCFL, Chicago, 
similarly are typical of Hall's bevy of 
key, productive stations over the 
years. 

Cherchez la fcramc. In general, the 
clothing manufacturer wants minutes 
in good local shows. Power of the 
station or its affiliation is unimportant, 
since, as a retailer, it is interested only 
in the immediate retail trading zone. 
And, since the company's primary 
target is the woman of the house, it 
has a wide-open field, availability-wise: 



: 



100 



SPONSOR 



tv any time of the day it can get good 
slots; radio the same, except between 
8 and 11 p.m. in certain markets, 
which, says Bess, is conceded to tv. 
After 11 p.m. it picks up radio again, 
keeping mother company as she bustles 
around locking up, tucking the family 
in bed, washing the last few dishes. By 
midnight she's about done and so is 
Robert Hall. Total: 10 to 12 announce- 
ments a day in radio, three or four 
in tv. 

Why the woman of the house? Af- 
ter all, half of Hall's sales are to men. 
Or are they? 

"Let's say half our sales consist of 
mens clothing," says Bess. "When a 
man spends $42.95 for a suit, chances 
are it's an important purchase. More 
important than a $100 suit is to the 
man who can afford it. So he has to 
check with mama to be sure the fam- 
ily exchequer can bear the bruise. 

Still, come the weekend and the 
firm ups its schedule in deference to 
the man of the house. After all, some 
do have some say as to what brand 
of pants they wear. 

Robert Hall's postwar expansion has 
of course had a profound influence on 
the company's ad strategy and, with 
other retailers, it has tried to keep pace 
with, even anticipate, the trend toward 
suburban living by moving farther and 
farther into the woods. Naturally, in 
a chain the size of Robert Hall, con- 
stant reshuffling is required. 

Like the grocery supermarkets with 
whose merchandising techniques Hall 
has much in common, the company 
seeks spots in heavily residential 
sections. 

When a location is finally decided 
upon, the firm opens up with the big 
guns, promotionwise. In true super- 
market style, opening day means a 
series of extravaganzas — guest appear- 
ances by performing stars, lucky num- 
ber drawings every hour on the hour, 
tape-cutting by the mayor, circus 
stunts — whatever seems to fit the time 
and the place. 

Bess, in his 10 years with the agency, 
has personally visited every Robert 
Hall market at least once and some 
many times. In setting up the Los 
Angeles area last December he made a 
flying trip to the city, rented a car and 
took the big tour, stopping at each unit 
to study the growth of the surrounding 
suburban area, visiting the local radio 
and television stations to discuss their 
part in the campaign. The 12 new 
Los Angeles area outlets are situated 

6 FEBRUARY 1956 



along the periphery of Los Angeles 
County and Bess estimates he covered 
265 miles in making the circuit. 

"There's a case where radio and tv 
are ideal," says Bess. "A station lo- 
cated in the middle of the circle can 
give us umbrella coverage, and that's 
the way we use it. 

"If we depended on newspapers 
there, we'd have to cut up our budget 
into many small pieces because each 
section along the way follows its own 
neighborhood newspaper and we'd 
have to go into each one to get the 
same kind of coverage we get by air. 

"But whatever media we decide on, 
we still have to get close up before 
we can write any copy. That's why I 
say we have no slide rule." 

In January Bess made similar on- 
the-spot surveys in preparation for the 
new St. Louis, Fort Worth and San 
Antonio stores. 

Love that jingle. Try to think of 
Robert Hall without subconsciously 
humming a Robert Hall jingle. Can't 
be done. Probably because there 
hasn't been a radio or tv announce- 
ment for the chain in 15 years that 
hasn't started with some variation on 
its basic musical message. Consider- 
ing the saturation levels of the com- 
pany's campaigns during that time, it 
adds up to heaven only knows how 
many millions of impressions. 

Over 100 different jingles have been 
used to date, varying as to lyrics or 
tune or orchestration. All, however, 
hue close to the "low-overhead, plain- 
pipe-rack" theme and seem to retain 
some semblance to each other. A few 
are staples repeated every year in sup- 
port of special seasonal promotions. 

At the beginning of the school semes- 
ters it's the back-to-school verse: 

"School bells ring and children sing, 

It's back to Robert Hall again. 

Mother knows for better clothes 

It's back to Robert Hall again. 

You'll save more on clothes for 
school. 

Shop at Robert Hall." 

During the yuletide it's: 

"We're doing our Christmas shop- 
ping at Robert Hall this year, 

We're saving on clothes for Christ- 
mas at Robert Hall this year. 

Low overhead means low prices on 
clothes for one and all, 

There's a larger collection, a bigger 
selection where America goes for 
Christmas clothes. 

It's Robert Hall this year." 



Those two jingles remain unchanged 
from year to year, along with Robert 
Hall's most popular theme song, "When 
the values go up, up, up. . . ." which 
is used from January to December. 

A new lyric is written every spring 
for the annual Easter expansion sales. 
And when, as in the case of Los An- 
geles and St. Louis, a store or stores 
are opened for the first time in a mar- 
ket, there's a jingle to herald their 
coming in Robert Hall fashion. This 
one is called, "Coming to Town." 

Composer of all Robert Hall jingles 
is Jack Wilcher, former guitarist with 
Red Nichols' orchestra. With Sawdon 
since 1944, Wilcher is a kind of Madi- 
son Avenue Bob Burns. He confers 
with agency head Frank Sawdon and 
Jerry Bess on all new campaigns, 
writes the lyrics, music, hires talent, 
supervises production, and, now with 
tv, works with animators (Pelican 
Films ) , etc. 

Actually, Wilcher uses no musical 
instrument when he works — just a 
sheet of music paper and a pencil. 

Future Robert Hall plans? Says 
Bess: "There's a saying, 'Make a fool 
smart and you become the fool.' I'm 
beginning to feel I've told you 
enough." * * * 




lr*~4f POWER 
J ^LUMBER 
AGRICULTURE. 



ra Pi<tly 

ket 



no* 

"*9 /, 

$242, 

~ re 9o#,' 



Th 
rt »>k e( i 



9i-o ty 
at'. 



n t t 
"»9 



eiJGE N 



and 

"•Or. 



CO 



°nh 



Sth 
*est. 



m 



9/ 6 , 



in 






s ery e</ 

I9ss 



000. 
se C0 



e t 



o t 



the 
Boy. 



h 



nd 



KERG 



n >or. 



5.000 WArrS-l280KC 



EUGENE. OREGON 

WA/Vr MOfi)£ FACTS P 

-COA/rACr W£ED £ CO. 



101 



REED HADLEY 

starring in 





PUBLIC 

DEFENDER 



He'll go all-out 

to win a 
case! Millions of 
Americans know 
that and love him for it. 
But Public Defender doesn't only 

swing juries. Entire segments 
of the population are influenced 

in their choice of food labels and 
merchandise brands by what they 

see advertised on these 
bristling-with-action Public Defender 

shows. In your market too, 
whatever you have to 

sell, Public 
Defender will tip 
the balance of 
public opinion 

in your favor! 

69 HALF HOURS 

First run in many markets! 
Powerful re-run value in 
ALL markets! 








TELEVISION CORPORATION 
NEW YORK CHICAGO HOLLYWOOD 

445 Park Ave. 1250 S.Wabash 4376 Sunset Drive 
MUrray Hill 8-2545 WAbash 2-7937 NOrmandy 2-9181 




Stuart Sherman, though only 49, was called 
from retirement to fill his new post as Colgate- 
Palmolive's vice president in charge of advertising. 
Sherman had been with Colgate from 1948 to 1954 
as a director and executive committee member. 
He first joined the company in 1930 as an office 
boy after graduating from Williams College. In 
1934 he became a v.p. of Lord and Thomas and 
later founded and became president of Sherman and 
Marquette. During '56 Sherman will spend a 
large portion of his time introducing 10 new 
Colgate products to be marketed nationally. 



Michael J. Foster, formerly Manager of Press 
Relations for CBS, moved over to ABC as of last 
30 January. In his new berth as Vice President 
in charge of Press Information and Advertising, 
Foster will supervise the activities of ABC's pub- 
licity, advertising and promotion departments. 
Except for four years with the U. S. Army during 
World War II, Foster has been with CBS since 19313. 
Before that he was a sports writer and reporter for 
the New York Journal-American and the New 
York Times. Raised and educated in New York, 
Foster is a resident of Manhattan and a member 
of the New York bar. 



W. Howard Chase, Vice President of McCann- 
Erickson, Inc., New York, has been elected presi- 
dent of the agency s newly formed public relations 
affiliate, Communications Counselors, Inc. He 
joined the agency as Head of the Public Relations 
Department a year ago, from his former association 
as a partner in the pr firm of Selvage, Lee & 
Chase. He was previously associated with Generul 
Mills as Director of Public Services and with 
General Foods as Director of Public Relations. 
Last October, Mr. Chase was elected President of 
the Public Relations Society of America. 



William W. Larzelere joined Fact Finders 
Associates as executive vice president on 1 January. 
Previously he was associated with Publiker 
Industries as Market Research Director and will 
continue as consultant there to Jack Leban, vice 
president in charge of liquor sales. Prior to that 
he was Marketing Manager for Schenley Distillers 
and Marketing Research Director for United 
Distillers. In his new capacity, Mr. Larzelere will 
direct the first semi-annual consumer survey of soft 
drink and alcoholic beverage brand preferences. 
According to Mr. Larzelere, it will be the first 
survey of its kind ever done. 



SPONSOR 




OVER HALF OF THE FARM INCOME OF INDIANA 






comes into 

farms served 

by WFBM-TV 



W 



Farm income state-wide: $1,236,903,125 

Farm income WFBM-TV-wide : $791,618,000 




6 FEBRUARY 1956 



WFBM-TV INDIANAPOLIS 

Represented Nationally by the Katz Agency 

Affiliated with WFBM-Radio; WOOD AM & TV, 
Grand Rapids; WFDF. Flint; WTCN, WTCN-TV. 
Minneapolis, St. Paul 

103 



IN THE LAND OF 

MILK AND3*ONEY 




THE ONLY CBS PROGRAMMING AVAIL- 
ABLE TO A MILLION NICE PEOPLE! 

From 7 A.M. to 1 A.M. 
Yep! Bigger'n Baltimore! 




HAYDN R. EVANS. Gen Mgr 



WEED TV. Rep. 



the 
summit 



Another 
top Radio in- 
dependent — KFMJ, 
in Tulsa, Oklahoma, 
takes top audience in 
the market's 7-day aver- 
age. See Nov.-Dec. Hooper. 
Call John E. Pearson Com- 
pany (JEPCO) in New York. 
Dial LU 5-5555 in Tulsa. 



ADVERTISERS' INDEX 

ABC-TV Network 64 

Air Trails Group 98 

A.T.&T. 89 

Bergmann Enterprises 94 

Broadcast Music Inc. 104 

Col. Pacific Radio Net. 5 

Interstate TV 102 

Mid-Continent Group 18 

Nat'l. Telefilm Assoc. 106 

NBC Radio Network _ 8-9 

Pulse, Inc. 74 

RCA TV Equipment 60-61 

Timebuying Basics 105 

Sponsor 8-9 

U.S. Bonds . 57 

Ziv-TV 52-53 

Sponsor 60-61 

CKI/W, Detroit 47 

KBIG, Hollywood 6 

KB IS, Baker sfield _ 58 

KCEN-TV, Temple, Tex. 90 

KCMC-TV, Texarkana 11 

KCMO, Kansas City IBC 

KDUB-TV, Lubbock, Tex .... 42 

KERG, Eugene, Ore. 101 

KFMJ, Tulsa, Okla 95, 97, 99, 104 

KHOL-TV, Kearney, Nebr 73 

KING-TV, Seattle 14 

KLZ-TV, Denver 59 

KMBC, Kansas City BC 

KMJ-TV, Fresno _ 80 

KMPC, Los Angeles 66 

KNAK, Salt Lake City 63 

KOIL, Omaha FC 

KOLN-TV, Lincoln, Nebr... 81 

KPAR-TV, Sweetwater-Abilene 94 

KOOL-TV, Phoenix 69 

KPIX, San Francisco 77 

KPQ, Wenatchee, Wash. 10 

KPTV, Portland, Ore. 21 

KRCA, Los Angeles 79 

KRIZ, Phoenix _ 96, 100 

KROD-TV, El Paso 93 

KSAN, San Francisco 82 

KTLN, Denver 78 

KTSA, San Antonio 51 

KVOO-TV, Tulsa 92 

KVWO, Cheyenne 96 

WABT, Birmingham 88 

WAFB-TV, Baton Rouge 83 

WAVE-TV, Louisville 13 

WB AY-TV, Green Bay ... 104 

WBNS, Columbus, Ohio 15 

WBTV, Charlotte 24 

WCOP, Boston 22 

WDEF-TV, Chattanooga 73 

WEHT-TV, Henderson, Ky. 93 

WEMP, Milwaukee 12 

WFAA, Dallas 17 

WFBM-TV, Indianapolis 103 

WFMY-TV, Greensboro, N. C. 91 

WGR-TV, Buffalo 90 

WGTO, Haines City, Fla 67 

WIBW-TV, Topeka 84 

WILK-TV, Wilkes-Barre 92 

WJ AC-TV, Johnston, Pa 86 

WJBK-TV, Detroit 23 

WJHP-TV, Jacksonville ...... 54 

WJIM-TV, Lansing 7 

WKNB-TV, W. Hartford 85 

WKY-TV, Oklahoma City 50 

WMBR, Jacksonville 49 

WMT-TV, Cedar Rapids 55 



WPAL, Charleston, S. C. 
WPEN, Philadelphia 



63 

3 

WREC-TV, Memphis .. 43 

WSAZ-TV, Huntington 70 

WSJS-TV, Winston-Salem 6S 

WSOK, Nashville 98 

WSRS, Cleveland 49 

WSYR, Syracuse 44-45 

WTAR-TV, Norfolk 47 

WTHI-TV, Terre Haute 87 

WTOP-TV, Washington .....16, A&B 

WXEX-TV, Richmond IF^ 






%wm,. 



BMI 



'Milestones' 1 
March 



for 



BMl's series of program 
continuities, entitled "Mile- 
stones," focuses the spot- 
light on important events 
and problems which have 
shaped the American scene. 
March's release features 
four complete half-hour 
shows — ready for immedi- 
ate use — smooth, well 
written scripts for a variety 
of uses. 

"THE FATHER OF MODERN 

PLAYCROUNDS" 

Joseph Lee 

Born: March 8, 1862 

"THE YOUNG FARMER" 

4-H Week 

March 13-19, 1956 

"ST. PATRICK'S DAY" 

March 17, 1956 

"THE FABULOUS OSCAR" 

(Story Behind the Academy Awards) 

March 14-21, 1956 

"Milestones" is available for 

commercial sponsorship see your 

local stations for details. 



m». -'WMm,. ■ ''WW/*,,. • "H 
BROADCAST MUSIC, INC. 

NEW YORK • CHICAGO • HOLLYWOOD 
TORONTO • MONTREAL 



20 YEARS OF 
EXPERIENCE! 

If you need an A-l radio- 
television executive, here is 
your answer. A twenty year 
veteran in broadcasting 
who has spent the last fifteen 
years in executive station 
management. Knows sales, 
promotion, programming, \ 
production, station operation 
inside and out. Prefers \ 
northeast, but will go where \ 
real opportunity knocks. 

Write or wire 

Box 26 
SPONSOR 

40 E. 49th, N. Y. 17, N. Y. 



104 



SPONSO 




40 East 49th Street, New York 17, New York 

In the 144 pages of TIMEBUYING BASICS 
readers will find the only book of its 
kind — the most expert route to radio and 
television timebuying. For the first time 
a group of men and women who represent the 
most authoritative and advanced thinking 
in the field, talk with complete candor 
about radio and television and the oppor- 
tunities these media offer in terms of 
their own intimate experiences. 
It came about when the Radio and Tele- 
vision Executives Society of New York 
sponsored 13 seminars for the benefit of 
timebuyers. So impressed was SPONSOR with 
the subject matter discussed that it 
sought and obtained permission to print a 
condensed, carefully edited version of the 
seminars in its 1955 Fall Facts issue. 
Now we've gone further. . .publishing TIME- 
BUYING BASICS as a handy 144 page book 
you'll want to refer to time and time 
again. 

Norm 




TIMEBUYING BASICS 



o 



40,000 word digest ot 13 RTES 

seminars as published In . . . \^^ 



ponsor Services Inc., 40 E. 49 St. N. Y. 22, N. Y. 

"ease send .. copies of TIMEBUYING BASICS to my attention 

i indicated below: 

] Bill Company Later □ Payment Enclosed 

y Name 

gency 

»ty — 



Title 



Address 



Zone 



State 



ill — 



Special Quantity Rates 



'-9 -$2.00 each 
3-24— $1.75 each 



TIMEBUYING BASICS IS 
INVALUABLE TO ALL WHO MAKE 
THEIR LIVING BUYING 
OR SELLING RADIO /TV TIME 



CONTENTS 


SEMINAR 


1 


SEMINAR 


2 


SEMINAR 


3 


SEMINAR 


4 


SEMINAR 


5 


SEMINAR 


6 


SEMINAR 


7 


SEMINAR 


8 


SEMINAR 


9 


SEMINAR 10 


SEMINAR 11 


SEMINAR 12 


SEMINAR 13 



The basics of audience measurement 

Pitfalls-pratfalls in audience research 

Giudes to more effective timebuying 

How to engineer a good buy 

Know your markets 

Agency practices — saints and sinners 

What buyers, sellers expect of each other 

How networks work; how to buy them 

Can you do better with spot? 

What does coverage cover? 

Does merchandising sell merchandise? 

Discussion of the ARF Report 

There's a rainbow in your future 



m Send for your copy TODAY! 



25-49— $1.50 each 
50-99— $1.25 each 



100 or more: 
$1.00 each 




6~X/5> 






A 




OF 
QUALITY... 




j, 



Since You Went Away 

I'll Be Seeing You 

Notorious 

The Parodine Case 

Bill Of Divorcement 



Portrait of Jennie 

The Farmer's Daughter 

Intermezzo 

The Spiral Staircase 

Garden Of Allah 



n keeping with our policy of offt 
the finest in quality feature film e< 
tainment for television . ..we are p. 
to announce that through arranger 
with Mr. David O. Selznick, NTA os 
acquired a gallery of masterpiece ay 
some of the premier motion picre 
producers of our time . . . 

Mr. Alfred Hitchcock 
Mr. Dore Schary 

and 

Mr. David O. Selznick 

These incomparable films will be off so 
under the title of 

"Selznick Presents. .." 

truly a milestone in televior 
entertainment. 

In a tradition of quality ... another ■ 
by NTA in bringing the finest in rmor 
picture entertainment to the tele*' '' 
audiences of America. 




N 




r\ li aiti&na/ 1 e/e£i/m J\tecct€i/€&, 



Ely A. Landau. Pres. 
National Telefilm Associates, Inc. 



INC. 60 West 55th Street, New York, N. Y. • PI fl 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 6 February 1956 

(Continued from page 2) 



Allocations stew 
can't end quickly 



Data pinpointed 
for timebuyers 



Money cracks 
Hollywood whip 



NBC pushes spot 
radio as booster 



Tv familiarity 
'breeds nothing" 



Tv set count 
out in April 



What can an advertiser or agency make out of the confused picture in 
Washington as FCC and Senate Interstate Commerce Committee wrestle 
with television allocations. It comes down to this: (1) Present 
allocation system which depended on uhf stations to make tv com- 
pletely national and competitive service doesn't work. Few uhf sta- 
t ions can compete against vhf. (2) Many uhf operators want to get 
at heart of matter by deintermixture, making all stations in any one 
market all 'u' or all 'v'. Difficulties of striding into allocations 
situation with blanket changes deintermixture entailed at this date 
are enough to have everyone walking the walls. (3) However situation 
is resolved, it won't be soon, not this year anyway. That's sad 
concensus. 

-SR- 
Timebuyers will be first to benefit if experiment underway at Katz 
Agency works out. Katz has appointed one of its salesmen, Ralph 
Hunter, to new job of "station specialist." His function: to cull 
facts provided by Katz sales data department and shape them into 
pinpointed presentations for salesmen to use. It's one more step to 
free salesmen for selling and give timebuyer data most pertinent t o 
his nee ds. Hunter is part of sales department, reports to Scott 
Donahue, tv sales manager. He's just first of station specialists 
if system proves successful. 

-SR- 
Flood of features now on market may be only trickle if advertisers 
see fit to take case to Hollywood film vaults. Sponsor West Coast 
reporter says moviemen ready to talk turkey on additional sale of 
feature film backlogs if agencies-advertisers are armed with cash 
and know rules of feature buying game. Thinking in film capital has 
cha-ged radically. For more on filmland revolt see "You can crack 
Hollywood dam but you have to know how," page 26 this issue. 

-SR- 
Growing use of national spot radio as "booster medium" is promoted 
by NBC Spot Sales in new presentation aimed at advertisers presently 
using spot radio. Presentation points up flexibility of medium in 
conjunction with tv, newspapers, other media as part of basic impact 
source. Included in estimate local radio's total 1955 billing tops 
$390 million, up $50 million over 1954. 

-SR- 
Jess Oppenheimer, producer-headwriter of "I Love Lucy," who moves to 
NBC in executive creative post this summer, says too many tv com- 
mercials lose their value after a few airings. "The old George 
Washington Hill approach of 'hit-' em-again-and-again' won't work 
today. Familiarity breeds nothing on tv. " Basis of Oppenheimer 
findings is long study he made on tv pitches. 

-SR- 
Latest reports indicates ARF tv set count data won't be out until 
April. Further refinements have been worked into complicated 
formula ARF is working on to break down May, 1955, Census Bureau 
national study into county-by-county figures. Meanwhile, Census will 
make another national tv set count this month. Like May, 1955, study, 
new survey is financed by 3 tv webs, TvB, NARTB, through ARF. No 
decision whether new survey will be broken down into county figures. 



6 FEBRUARY 1956 



107 



SPONSOR 
SPEAKS^ 



What made newspapers great? 

We've always had the greatest re- 
spect for newspapers which over the 
years have achieved the status of the 
greatest medium in size of billings in 
the entire history of advertising. 

So you can't blame us for being 
puzzled when we note stories to the 
effect that the Bureau of Advertising 
of the ANPA will make an out-and- 
out attack on television during 1956. 

Is that the way the newspapers 
achieved greatness? 

We think newspapers achieved their 
stature because of the separate and 
distinct advertising values of news- 
papers as compared with billboards, 
direct mail, radio, television. 

This kind of thinking by the ANPA 
Bureau of Advertising can't help but 
weaken the newspapers. 

An indication of the way the ANPA 
approach is being met by television 
broadcasters, is the point of view of 
Oliver Treyz, president of the Tele- 
vision Bureau of Advertising: 

"If the newspaper bureau is con- 



verting itself into an Anti-Bureau, TvB 
will not become an Anti-newspaper 
Bureau. 

"Copy research, testing impact of 
advertisements, shows a campaign de- 
signed to launch a 'frontal assault' on 
a specific competitor does not work to 
the advantage of the advertiser and, 
usually, is a waste of money. If this 
be true of advertising — and we believe 
it is — it is also true of media promotion 
and selling. 

"On our part, we would prefer to 
emulate that portion of the standards 
of practice of the American Association 
of Advertising Agencies . . . which says 
"unfair competitive practices in the 
advertising agency business leads to 
financial waste, dilution of service, 
diversion of manpower and loss of 
prestige. Unfair practices tend to 
weaken public confidence in advertise- 



Applause 



Client-agency longevity 

There are always cases where the 
only right way to solve an agency- 
advertiser problem is by canning the 
agency. If the agency can't meet new 
challenges, what can an alert client do 
but seek new brains? 

But at a time when many advertis- 
ers who are heavily invested in tele- 
vision and radio are changing agen- 
cies, our thoughts turn to those clients 
who have maintained long-term rela- 
tionships with agencies and will con- 
tinue their relationships indefinitely. 



Ad Drive 
Against TV 

Stress To Be Put 
On Dollar Value 

CHICAGO, Jan. 24 «W.— News- 
papers are planning a "frontal 
assault" on te'-visi' *•» in the fear 



ments and in the institution of adver- 
tising.' 

"Taking our cue from the wisdom 
in AAAA's statement, we would like 
to suggest that if the newspapers, 
through the Bureau of Advertising, 
devote their manpower and budgets 



It can't always be achieved, but this 
is the ideal in advertising. For new, 
creative thinking achieved by an agency 
switch, you can find countless benefits 
attained through a consistent relation- 
ship with the right shop. 

Think of the hours of briefing of 
new people down the line from ac- 
count men, to copy writers, to time- 
buyers to research department people. 
They are non-productive hours length- 
ening into weeks, all dedicated to cor- 
recting mistakes of the past. How 
much better it is to work out means 



to building and promoting newspapers, 
as opposed to negative and unwar 
ranted attacks on competing media, all 
advertising would be better served." 

We think that the Bureau of Adver- 
tising will gain immeasureably if it 
heeds the counsel of TvB's Oliver 
Treyz. If it does not, we will be treat- 
ed to a spectacle during 1956 of 
charges and counter-charges in which 
the newspapers will find themselves 
hopelessly outgunned. Frank E. Pelle 
grin, a veteran sales executive and 
vice president of H-R Television, 
painted this picture for SPONSOR oi 
the hopeless tack on which newspapers 
have embarked. Again, we hope the 
newspapers will heed the warning: 

"How wildly inconsistent it seems 
to 'sell' a constructive force like ad- 
vertising with the basically destructive 
'approach' of the ANPA Bureau. 

"Can you imagine a newspaper 
salesman's approach to 'major spoil 
sors' based on showing them how 
stupid they were to put their 1955 
budgets into tv (and this in the face 
of unprecedented sales and profit 
peaks by U. S. business in 1955) ; on 
proving how the newspapers' 'major 
research projects' have shown how 
little impact tv has on viewers! 

"If this isn't a travesty on sales 
manship and a waste of good research 
money, heaven help us all! 

"We think American businessmen 
prefer in 1956, as always, to hear what 
is good about a medium; what it can 
do for its sponsors' product; how it 
can build the world's greatest econo 
my even greater. 

"Television has done exactly that. 
We see no need to change our ap- 
proach in 1956." 



of keeping the agency-advertiser rela- 
tionship on a self-correcting basis. 

In our opinion it's as much the re- 
sponsibility of client executives to 
work at preserving the agency-adver- 
tiser relationship as it is the responsi- 
bility of agency management. And to 
all those in agencies and advertising 
firms who have maintained long-term 
relationships, despite the tensions 
which are part of any fast-moving 
business, our applause for a job in 
human relations well done. 



108 



SPONSOR 




« . p r . . . n I . d by <»II AOlNCY INC. 



JOHN BLAIR i, CO. BIAIB TV, INC. 



MEREDITH Kadi* and leUrttio* STATIONS 

affiliated with llpllCI' llllllll'S Mill liill'lllllN aid Successful Farming magazines 



KMBC-KFRM " 



Service Programming 




the [Heart) of America! 






K 


A N 


S"-:'a' 






'""-/ 


mac 


MINiON* 








OOOCt CIT? 


AtI 




™T, 



The KMBC-KFRM half-millivolt con- 
tours cover some of the richest, most 
productive farm land in the United 
States! Much of the total money spent 
for goods and services in this area 
comes directly from farm families — 
and many millions more are spent by 
people whose incomes are derived indi- 
rectly from agriculture. 




KFI& 




PHIL EVANS 




JIM LEATHERS 



Because farming: is so important 
to so many in the Heart of Amer- 
ica, farm programming receives 
prime attention on KMBC-KFRM. 
Two full-time farm experts, Phil 
Evans and Jim Leathers, have 
built KMBC-KFRM rural listener- 
ship into one of the most respon- 
sive farm audience groups in the 
nation. Their 5:30 to 7:00 a.m. 
"RFD" Farm Service Program and 
their noontime market, livestock 
and farm news reports on "Dinner- 
bell Roundup" reach farmers dur- 
ing the top rural listening hours. 

Evidence of KMBC-KFRM pull- 
ing power was dramatically dem- 



onstrated last fall when a major 
fertilizer manufacturer reported 
the following cost - per - inquiry 
breakdown on a free booklet of- 
fered regionally 





Cost 


Medium 


Per Inquiry 


KMBC-KFRM 


S .90 


Radio Station A 


1.12 


Radio Station B 


1.46 


Radio Station C 


3.77 


Farm Paper A 


4.15 


Radio Station D 


4.17 


Farm Paper B 


5.11 


Farm Paper C 


5.41 


Farm Paper D 


7.13 


Farm Paper E 


8.82 


Farm Paper F 


12.16 



SURVEY-PROVED, FIRST IN FARM RADIO PREFERENCE! 

Further proof of KMBC-KFRM farm market domination came during the 
nationally famous American Royal Livestock & Horse Show in Kansas City 
last October. To evaluate farm radio preferences, a special college-trained 
marketing unit interviewed more than 800 Royal visitors from farms in 
Western Missouri and the State of Kansas. The results, tabulated below, show 
KMBC-KFRM leads all competition in preferred farm service programming. 



To what stations do you listen for Radio Farm 
Editors and Market Reporters? 



Z% 
1% 
3% 



On what station do you depend most for Farm 
Information Service? 




To what station do you listen most 
for news— General News? 

| KMBC-KFRM 

Station B 77///////\ ZO% 

Station C gXTfifc * 

AH others gXZXXXX3'^ 

To what station do you listen for Farm 
Information other than Market Reports? 

KMBC-KFRM 
Station A 
Station B ZZZZZZZ2'* 

Station C GX3 tf * 

A" o'"ers [XXXXX //^ 




PHIL EVANS, KMBC-KFRM Farm Service Direct, 
spects his flock of prize White Leghorns at one 
KMBC-KFRM Service Farms near Stanley, Kansas 
known as the Dean of Midwestern Farm Broadcc 
is a practical farmer as well as a shrewd agriaj 
analysist— a happy combination which makes f. | 
thoritative reporting to his thousands of rural list < 



JIM LEATHERS, Associ- 
ate Farm Service Direc- 
tor, tapes an on-the- 
scene interview for one 
of his popular daily 
broadcasts from the 
Kansas City Stockyards. 
Jim eats, sleeps and 
breathes farming. His 
keen insight into agri- 
cultural problems gives 
the Midwest farmer fac- 
tual information heard 
only on KMBC-KFRM. 




CONTRACT RENEWALS REFE 
SPONSOR SUCCESS 

Account longevity is still another examploi 
effectiveness of KMBC-KFRM farm pi?i 
ming. Staley Milling Company has spis 
twice-daily broadcasts for 16 years — 8,0) i 
secutive shows! Pioneer Hybrid Seed Cn 
been on the air with more than 9 years f 
tinuous broadcasts. Kansas City Livestock Ir 
ests have a five-year record of successfu id 
tising on KMBC-KFRM. Other long-tin : 
advertisers could be added to this list — eh 
a powerful testimonial for the results fill 
vertisers get on KMBC-KFRM! 

Remember, farm service is just one seg en 
the well-balanced, result-getting radio p gn 
ming on KMBC-KFRM. For up-to-the-mi t 
tails on the "New Sound" of KMBC-KF.Vl 
vour Free & Peters Colonel. 



I EM 



>w Soi 



KMBC ^ Kansas City 
[FRNlfin the State of Kansas 



find in ■• on, the Swing is to KMBC-TV, Kansas City's Most Powerful TV Station! 



M<j 



>''t» i 
JOHN SCHIUINC. 

OEOROE HIGGINS 

DICK SMITH. 

MORI ORIINER. 



S? D 12- 

M« EDWARD STCOUAH 
N C - ROOM 604 
30 ROCKEFELLER PlA2 
f von K 2 N V 



lagazine radio 1/ advertisers use 



20 FEBRUARY 1956 



50* per copy« $ 8 per year 




is the word for the COVERAGE WDGY's 
1000 watts give you in MINNEAPOLIS-ST. PAUL 




WDGY 

MINNEAPOLIS - St PAUL 
50,000 WATTS I 130 KC. 

METROPOLITAN POP. 1,200,000 
TOTAL POP (O.IMV/M) 2,653,897 

50 10 

scale of miles 



l(^ 



• . . . and WDCY has an almost perfect circle signal daytime. 
Watch what happens to radio listening when Mid-Continent 
programming, ideas, music and news fill the Twin Cities air. 
Call WDCY General Manager Stephen Labunski or Avery-Knodel. 



WDGY 



Minneapolis-St. Paul 50,000 watts 



CONTINENT BROADCASTING COMPANY 

President: Todd Srorz 



WDGY, Minneapolis-St. Paul 
Represented by 
Avery-Knodel 



WHB, Kansas City 
Represented by 
John Blair & Co. 



WTIX, New Orleans 
Represented by 
Adam J. Young, Jr. 



KOWH, Omaha 
Represented by 
H-R Reps, Inc. 



15% -IS IT ON 
THE WAY OUT? 

page 27 

Is it all play fo 
Hollywood admen 

page 30 



: 

w 

: 




WHY WE BOUGHT 
SPOT RADIO 

page 32 



II 



a get 
10 for RKO 



Air media 
$400,000 
Conqueror" campaign 

page 34 



is mc 



ebuttal to Mr. 
who said, "Marketing 
is malarkey" 

page 36 



I Air media bur 
works overtime (or 
Western Union 

page 38 



„ 



I 



set cr 
coming 



page 40 



The south's FIRST TV station 

WTVR 

RICHMOND 

Serving Virginia with 

MAXIMUM POWER - MAXIMUM HEIGHT 

CHANNEL 6 

No other station in this market 
has any Qreater Antenna Height 

1049 FEET 

And no other Station in this market 

has comparable TV Facilities to 1049 Feet 

On Channel 6 A service of Havens & Martin, Inc. 



Represented by BLAIR TV INC. 




MBS guarantees 
exposure 



ARB coverage 
study is out 



More closed 
circuit tv 



Official Films 
acquires 4-Star 



RAB surveys 
Pepsodent jingle 



New Mutual guaranteed cost-per-1,000 plan goes step beyond circulation 
guarantees offered by magazines. MBS figure is cost-per-1,000 people 
actually exposed to commercial as determined by A. C. Nielsen. Maga- 
zines don't guarantee ad readership, only copy circulation. Cost- 
per-1,000 guarantee will vary with number of stations ordered, type 
of audience sought, expenditure. For example, advertiser who wants 
specialized audience will pay higher cost-per M than client seeking 
broad audience. Make-goods will be given if guarantee isn't met 
"but you can be sure we'll seek to bolster programing to make this 
unnecessary," commented MBS' Harry Trenner. 

-SR- 
Latest ARB coverage study, out today (20 February), gives admen data 
on some 235 "problem" markets. These include fringe areas, areas not 
covered by rating services, areas where station changes make up-to- 
date coverage measurement important. This is ARB's second "Abilene to 
Zanesville" survey, includes 60 of the 163 markets covered in first 
survey year ago. Data includes (1) tv saturation in market, (2) 
stations received in market, (3) percent of homes able to receive sta- 
tions, (4) stations viewed most daytime, evening, including 1st, 
2nd preferences. Information is given in percentages but admen can 
convert to numbers when ARF county-by-county set data is out in April. 

-SR- 
BBDO joins others who are turning to closed-circuit tv for inter-city 
meetings without cost of traveling executives to central point. BBDO 
will turn cameras on its own affairs on Friday (24 February) and cover 
9 offices via closed circuit to tell "what's new at BBDO." 

-SR- 
In stock transfer deal involving 1 92 tv films , Official Films has 
acquired all assets of Four Star Productions and Four Star Television. 
Included are: 129 "Four Star Playhouse" programs, 39 "The Star and 
the Story" ("Henry Fonda Presents"), 24 "Stage 7," 25% profit share 
in "Sheena, Queen of the Jungle." Official also gets all national 
and syndication sales rights on future Four Star Playhouse films 
starring Dick Powell, David Niven, Charles Boyer, others, and syndi- 
cation rights on "du Pont ' s Cavalcade Theatre," plus tv rights to 
W. Somerset Maugham literary properties. 

-SR- 
With golden chance to prove radio's effectiveness in getting public 
to recall advertised brands, RAB has $8-10,000 study going on Lever 
Bros.' $2 million spot campaign for Pepsodent (see SPONSOR, 26 
December 1955). Survey, in 4 key markets, via Advertest Research 
probes consumer impact first and second months after start of radio 
drive. Miniature portable phonograph plays half of jingle ("You'll 
wonder where the yellow went") to test sponsor identification. Lever 
spokesman says results will influ e nce consideration of media use for 
other Pepsodent Division products. 



.1 



SPONSOR. Volume 10. No. 4. 
York 17. Printed at 3110 Elm 



20 February 1956. Published biweekly by SPONSOR Pub'ieations, Inc. Executive. Editorial. Advertising. Circulation Offices, 40 E. 49th St.. New 
Ave., Baltimore. Md. $8 a year in U.S. $9 elsewhere. Entered as second class matter 29 Jan. 1948 at Baltimore postoffice under Act of 3 Mar. 1879 



REPORT TO SPONSORS for 20 February 1956 



ARF set count 
due in April 



RAB starts 
sales clinic 



Radio drive 
in Texas 



Tv set 
sales drop 



'Window' concept 
successful 



U. S. tv is 
inspected 



West Coasters 
no playboys 



Tv set count progress is being made. ARF will release county-by- 
county tv set count in April ; NCS No. 2 will be out this fall with 
set count data based on 125,000-home sample. (For complete rundown 
on status of various set count efforts, see "What's with tv set count 
these days?" page 40, this issue.) 

-SR- 

Radio Advertising Bureau's 1956 sales clinic gets underway today (20 
February) in Roanoke, Va. New series of sales training and manage- 
ment sessions will be presented in 50 cities over next 12 weeks. 
Theme of clinics will be "Sound Selling in a TV Age." All-day 
sessions will concentrate on developing radio revenue from 6 sources: 
financial firms, men's apparel, drug stores, retail merchant groups, 
summer advertisers and competitive visual media. 

-SR- 

Seventy Texas radio have banded together to put together biggest 
radio promotion in state's history. Campaign theme is "Listen while 
you ..." drive, work or play. Force behind idea is Texas Associa- 
tion of Broadcasters. McCann-Erickson, Dallas, is agency. Prac- 
tically every promotional device is used: on-the-air plugs, 24-sheet 
boards, newspaper ads, bumper strips, counter cards, envelope en- 
closures. Stations using campaign expected to double by April. 

-SR- 

In a preliminary report issued by Television Digest in semi-annual 
Television Factbook it was revealed 2,437,000 tv sets were sold in 
last quarter of 1955, 240,000 fewer sales than same period in 1954. 

-SR- 

NBC TV is planning to expand "Window" programing now that Gimbel's 
and Bergdorf-Goodman have contracted for available segments in New 
York; both took 5 segments across board. "Window," NBC TV's effort 
to crack department store field, was unveiled at NRDGA meeting in 
city last month. Hecht Co. in Washington, D. C, picked up 5 "Window' 
segments from WRC TV, NBC o&o in capital city. Other o&o's expect 
to sign clients in near future. 

-SR- 

Tv operation, especially in East, is getting good looking over from 
foreigners who expect to go into commercial tv in near future. Most 
of visitors from Australia and Italy. Italians will have commercial 
tv at end of year or early '57. Australians hope to be on air com- 
mercially by fall. Visitors hope U. S. inspection will eliminate 
early mistakes in their effort, get effective tv results quicker. 

-SR- 

Who has it toughest among agency executives? West coast branch 
managers of New York agencies make out pretty good case for them- 
selves. Chi ef complaint is time differential which allows only brief 
period to call New York each day without running into lunch hour. 
Hollywood admen complain, too, they aren't kept in touch with account 
problems, are too often thought of as living the life of Riley. 
(See article page 30.) 

(Sponsor Reports continues page 111) 



SPONSOR 




the key to selling 



WGAL-TV 



LANCASTER, PENNA. 



NBC and CBS 






Here's truly one of America's KEY 
markets — prosperous, diversified, 
vast. Buying the WGAL-TV Chan- 
nel 8 Multi-City Market opens 
your way to 3 Vi million prospects 
who own 912,950 TV sets, who 
have $51/2 billion to spend. 




the magazine ra 



advertisers use 




ARTICLES 



20 February 1956 
Volume 10 Number 



! 



DEPARTMENTS 



15% — is it on the way out? 

The question is again the subject of soul-searching among advertisers, agencies 
and media in wake of consent decree entered by 4A's. However, decree will 
not effect future of 15% as much as other long-term forces at work in tv, 
radio industry is concensus 



Madison Ave. should have it so bad 

Hollywood branch managers live high in New York admen's impression, but 
those on the West Coast say it's no fun. They battle time and information 
problems as they seek to coordinate agency activities 



Here's why we bought spot radio 

Case histories of five national advertisers indicate spot radio has been back- 
bone medium to some, booster medium to others, as it returns to popularity 



RKO hails "Conqueror" 

Air media get 30% of Hughes' epic $1.2 million for saturation campaign de- 
veloped to tie in with global publicity drummed up through foreign premieres 



You're living in the past, Mr. "X" 

In reply to Mr. "X", the unidentified adman who authored "Marketing is 
Malarkey" article in last issue of SPONSOR, a defender of the agency market- 
ing trend says you can't halt progress. Agencies must grow to air their clients 



Tv, radio do good news job for Western Union 

Western Union's comparatively small air media budget is spent wisely to gain 
proper commercial atmosphere. Company battles wartime hangover by telling 
audiences of revamped services, stressing that good news travels fast 



II hat's with the tv set count? 

There ara many complications involved in trying to figure out the number of 
television sets in the U.S., but article tells how progress is being made 



27 



30 



32 



34 



36 



38 



40 



COM I N,C 



Summer Selling, 1956 

SPONSOR'S seventh annual Summer Selling Section will cover all aspects of 
hot-weather air selling, incuding special summer advertising techniques, both 
network and spot, out-of-home audiences, research highlights and success stories ** ™""' 

Sealy Mattress gets them just before bedtime 

Timing is important, company finds. Half hour film series (across the board) 
proves just right for catching adults when they're in the mood to consider 
laying out money for sleep equipment «* IfMar. 



AGENCY AD LIBS 

AGENCY PROFILE, Arthur C. Fc 

49TH & MADISON 

MR. SPONSOR, Olof V. Anderson 

NEW AND RENEW 

NEW TV STATIONS 

N EWSMAKERS 

P.S. 

ROUNDUP 

SPONSOR ASKS 

SPONSOR BACKSTAGE 

SPONSOR SPEAKS 

TV COMPARAGRAPH 

TV RESULTS 

TIMEBUYERS 

TOP 20 TV SHOWS 



Editor and President: Norman R. G n 

Secretary-Treasurer: Elaine Couper it 

Vice President-Genl. Manager: Bern< I 

Vice Pres.-Adv. Dir.: Charles W. God 

Executive Editor: Miles David 

Editorial Director: James E. Allen 

Senior Editors: Alfred J. Jaffe, Alvii-ti 
Evelyn Konrad 

Assistant Editor: Robert S. Solotaire 

Contributing Editors: Bob Foreman, J C 

Editorial Assistants: Morton C. Kahrj> 

Morse 

Art Director: Donald H. Duffy 
Photographer: Lester Cole 

Advertising Department: Arnold Al I 
sistant Advertising Manager; E 
Cooper, Western Manager; John A. w 
Production Manager; Charles I n 1 
George Becker, Jean Engel 

Circulation Department: Dorothy H 
Subscription Manager; Emily Cutillo 

Office Manager: Catherine Scott Re 

Accounting Department: Laura Ok« u 
Fazio 

Secretary to Publisher: Helen L. Hi>» 



Published biweekly by SPONSOR PUBLICATI 
combined with TV. Executive, Editorial Clra 
Advertising Offices: 40 E. 49th St. (49tb / 
New York 17. N. Y. Telephone: MTJrray I 
Chicago Office: 161 E. Grand Ave. Phone 
7-9863. Loa Angeles Office: 6087 Sunset 
Phone: Hollywood 4-8089. Dallas Office: 31 
St Phone STerling 3591. Printing Office: 
Ave.. Baltimore 11, Md. Subscriptions: Uc 
$8 a year. Canada and foreign $9. Single 
Printed In U.S.A. Address all correspond 
E. 49th St.. New York 17, N. Y. MTJrray I 
Copyright 1955. SPONSOR PUBLICATION 



S 1 
la. 
Ik 
M 
H* 

win 

mi 
m 

* I 

• i 
m 



KTHS 



(LITTLE ROCK) 






goes G/ttMGUm 

for Gunn Distributing Co! 




Mr. W. C. Coleman, founder 
of the Coleman Co., Wichita, 
Kansas, presents gold cup to 
Leland Gunn — nation's best 
1955 distributor for famous 
Coleman Blend-Air Heating. 



This letter indicates the kind of response advertisers 
can get when they use KTHS Little Rock, for most 
of Arkansas! To save your eye-sight, we quote! 

"Our sales during October-Novem- 
ber . . . average 70% more than 
last year. 

". . . we received a gold cup . . . the 
Nation's Best Coleman Distributor 
for 1955! ... in '54, we used KTHS 
as well as all types of advertising 
media . . . this year we used only 
KTHS and can truly say that radio 
has played the dominant role . . . 
most successful promotion ever 
scheduled by Gunn . . . 

"We will be happy to certify to the 
wide coverage and pulling power 
of KTHS. Our dealers all over the 
state are convinced ..." 

KTHS is the biggest, most effective, most powerfid 
radio station in Arkansas. IT GETS RESULTS. 
Ask your Branham man for availabilities! 



KTHS 



50,000 WATTS 
CBS RADIO 

BROADCASTING FROM 

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS 

20 FEBRUARY 1956 



Represented by The Branham Co. 

Under Same Management as KWKH, Shreveport 

Henry Clay, Executive Vice President 
B. G. Robertson, General Manager 



CASE HISTORY-AUTOMOTIVE 





Los Angeles Radio 

Saturation Builds World's 

Biggest Buick Agency 

In business three years — today the biggest 
Buick dealer in the world. 

First month in business, 57 new car sales — 
today, monthly average 10 times that. 

That's the short but stirring saga of Ed James 
and his I l-acre "Jamestown" in downtown 
Los Angeles. 

There's one constant element in James' suc- 
cess story: he saturates Los Angeles area car- 
buyers by saturating independent radio. 

Ed James' sparkling jingles are on KBIG every 
day . . . have been for the past three years, 
telling listeners why volume sales, volume 
savings make "Jamestown-Buicktown best 
place to buy your Buick." 

Huge, sprawling, rich Southern California 
can be reached best by radio . . . KBIG plus 
other stations if, like Ed James, you want 
1 00% dominance; KBIG alone, if you want 
the greatest coverage at lowest cost-per- 
thousand listeners. 

Any KBIG sales representative will be glad to 
give you the complete published story of Ed 
James' radio success. 




JOHN POOLE BROADCASTING CO. 

6540 Sunset Blvd., Hollywood 28, California 
Telephone: Hollywood 3-3205 





£3* *fc*. 




Alice J. Wolf, /. {Falter Thompson, New York, 
says that radio is being rediscovered by many 
clients who've ignored it in the recent past. "The 
important thing to remember is that radio today 
plays a very important role in the life of housewives, 
men going to and from work, families who're busy 
in parts of the house other than the living room. 
With the constant increase in set sales, it's obvious 
that listening must be rising too, even if it is not 
fully measured. Advertisers are finding it a valu- 
able, low-cost medium that offers broad coverage 
and has an advertising impact at times and in 
places where no other medium can reach the pub- 
lic as effectively. Each product and each problem 
dictates a different use of radio, but the medium 
can't be ignored." 



Jack Geller, Weiss & Geller, New York, has 
found short flurries of 10-week saturations separated 
by 10-week hiatuses a most effective way of using 
spot tv. "The impact of the medium is such," says 
he, "that we find the impression lingers that we're 
on tv continuously with a product even during the 
time when we're off. We've been using this approach 
for one client for three years now: in from April til 
June, out til September, then in again. We find 
that it's a far more effective approach than spread- 
ing the budget thin throughout the entire period. Our 
aim is to achieve 100 rating points a week per 
market. This means an average of 200 announce- 
ments a week in each market. We get the carry- 
over of strong network shows by buying adjacent 
to them, and then we sell." 



Ralph S. Reubin, Reed Advertising, New York, 
says that radio salesmen are missing a good bet. 
"With so many small and medium-sized accounts 
interested in the possibilities of spot radio today, 
stations could develop a great deal of new business 
by concentrating their thinking on this size adver- 
tiser. Every ad agency has at least one and usually 
several accounts on the verge of buying spot radio, 
but they need a little push over the brink — and 
planned thinking by station sales managers or 
station reps could easily bring a lot of new adver- 
tisers into the field. It takes more than fust a call 
telling of the advantages of one station over another. 
It takes specific suggestions for specific accounts. 
And most agencymen will be glad to steer such 
tailor-made thinking into the proper channels." 



SPONSOR 




KSTP Radio and 

Television offer 

FREE supermarket 

merchandising to 

food advertisers! 

• BARGAIN BARS 

• SPECIAL DISPLAYS 

• STORE CALLS 
► COMPLETE REPORTS 





1 



f HEADQUABTtRS (OR "^ 



KSTP 

FEATURE FOODS 



•mm 



It's NEW and EXCLUSIVE in the Northwest! 



KSTP Feature Foods Merchandising is now at 
work for food advertisers in the important Northwest 
market! 

In 200 high-volume supermarkets, the full-time 
KSTP